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THE RICHARDSON 

LIGHT GUARD 



■-is^JW 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 
Lucius Beebe IVIemorial Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofrichard01eato 




DR. SOLO>' 0,SMOM> ItiCUAKDSON 

July 19, 1809 — August 31, 1873 



mSTORlJ 



OF THE 



OF 

IPAKEFIELD, MASS. 



Couering the third quarter r-centunj period 
1901^1926 



Published under the Direction and Authority of the General 

Committee on the Occasion of the Seventy-fifth 

Anniversary of the Company 

October 12, 1926 



Item Press, Wakefield, Mass. 



G,(L. 
C3 




September 9, 1841 — Ottobei- 1, 1922 
SOLON OSMOND KICHAKDSON 
Son of Dr. S. O. KUhardson, Sr. 



\>/ Iho&^I 




SOIiON OSMOND KICHARDSON 

Toledo, Ohio 
Grandson of Dr. S. O. Richardson 



Military Designations Of The Richardson Light Guard 

Co. D, 7th Reg't Mass. Vol Militia, 1851— '55 

Co. E, 7th Reg't Mass. Vol. Militia, 1855— '61 

Co. B, 5th Reg't Mass. U. S. Vols., (3 mos.) 1861 

Co. E, 7th Reg't Mass. Vol. Militia, 1861 

Co. E, 50th Reg't Mass. U. S. Vol., (9 Mos.) 1862—63 

Co. E, 7th Reg't Mass. Vol. Militia, 1863 

Co. E, Sth Reg't Mass. U. S. Vols., (100 Days) 1863— '64 

Co. E., 8th Reg't Mass. Vol. Militia, 1864— '66 

Co. A, 6th Reg't Mass. Vol. Militia 1866— '98 

Co. A, 6th Reg't Mass. Inf. U. S. Vols., 1898— '99 

Co. A, 6th Reg't Mass. Vol. Militia, 1899—01 

Company A 6th Regt. Inf., M. V. M., to June, 1913. 
hJote: 

1913. The Dick Bill was passed by Congress and all State 
Militia became National Guard. 

In 1916 a new dual oath was taken at time of Mexican 
trouble. 
Company A 6th Regt. Inf., Mass. National Guard to Nov. 

1917 (World War). 
Company H 12th Regt. Mass. State Guard. During the 

World War. 
Company A 6th Regt. Provisional (Reorganized) Sept. 

1919. 
Company K 9th Regt. Inf. National Guard to Oct. 1920 
Company E 182nd Regt. Inf. National Guard, 1923 to 
Company E 182nd Regt. Inf. National Guara, 1923 to 

date 



INTRODUCTION 

Few towns or cities in the United States of America, especially 
in the New England States where old institutions abound, num- 
ber among such organizations a military unit possessing prestige 
equal to that of Wakefield's "ancient and honorable" Richardson 
Light Guard. None of these towns can produce a record of three- 
quarters of a century's continuous military activities more com- 
mendable than the conspicuous services rendered by this venerable 
•organization. 

The year 1926 marks the Diamond Jubilee of the brilliant, 
rare and invaluable career of the Richardson Light Guard, char- 
acteristic of the brilliancy, rarity and pricelessness of the precious 
gem that typifies the 75th milestone of Time. 

Attainments incident to the Golden Anniversary were notable 
and valorous in themselves, marking half a century of highly im- 
portant and thrilling events. Yet another quarter century's 
period has added new distinctions and additional encomiums in 
keeping with the inspiring example of patriotism, devotion, loyalty 
.and service exemplified by young men of former days who have 
•successively filled the ranks of the Richardson Light Guard for 
three generations. 

No one could foretell, on October 11, 1851, the destinies of the 
newly formed military company in South Reading. It was on 
that date that the company was chartered, after weeks of prelimi- 
nary discussion and efforts. 

Nor could anyone foretell, at the inception of this company, 
that the town of South Reading, then a small, quiet village, 
would change its name and develop into a thriving municipality 
■of 16,000 inhabitants in three-quarters of a century, possessing 
among other valued institutions a substantial State Armory 
erected by a grateful Commonwealth in recognition of the career 
of this infant organization of 1851. 

In the carefully prepared historic volume published in 1901, 
recording a half-century of the Richardson Light Guard, mention 
is made of the four responses of the organization to the defense 
of the Union, in the Civil War. The brilliant deeds and patri- 
otism of the young men of South Reading, from 1861 to 1865 are 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

familiar to all who have kept posted on local historic affairs. 

Again in 1898 the Richardson Light Guard demonstrated 
equal devotion and loyalty by participating in the Spanish-Amer- 
ican War, adding another chapter of honor and achievements. 

These important events being matters of public record ta 
the year 1901, it is not necessary in this volume to again review 
historic incidents already recorded. The purpose of this book, 
therefore, is to present in permanent form a review covering the 
third quarter-century, from 1901 to 1926. In this period oc- 
curred the great World War in which the typically characteristic 
repetition of devotion and valour displayed in former years main- 
tains an honored reputation. Thus a complete history of the 
Richardson Light Guard, under various military appellations, is 
recorded for posterity with the hope that future generations may 
be inspired by unselfish devotion of those who have served their 
country in the town's representative military unit. An earnest 
endeavor has been made to faithfully portray this historic review. 

Whether history repeats itself in respect to future conflicts of 
men and nations is not for us to comment on, at this time, ex- 
cept to express universal hope that Peace may prevail forever; 
but if necessity arises, it is certain that the valorous deeds of their 
fathers will likewise be repeated by worthy sons of Wakefield in 
upholding the glorious, out-standing record of the Richardson 
Light Guard. 

Today the Richardson Light Guard starts on its last quarter- 
century. ' It is assured that the "Spirit of 76" so amply revived 
and exemplified by Wakefield defenders in the Civil, Spanish and 
World Wars will be faithfully maintained by the Richardson 
Light Guard, whether in Peace or War. In upholding Patriotism, 
Freedom and Liberty we may rest secure, insofar as the company 
is concerned, for these noble principles of American citizenship are 
deeply rooted with unfailing breadth and firmness. Our country 
m.ay feel assured that the young men comprising institutions such 
as the Richardson Light Guard will continue to "carry on" and 
uphold the cherished precepts and sacrificial examples of those who- 
have gone on before, or who have already given military service 
for the welfare of our Country, State and Town. 

Reference to the Richardson Light Guard would be incom- 
plete without mentioning the loyalty of Wakefield people and 
friends to this institution, throughout more than seven decades. 
Conspicuous among these friends of the company is the Richard- 
son family. At the inception of the organization in 1851 Dr. 
Solon O. Richardson, the first of his name, contributed a gener- 
ous sum of money toward equipping the company. His son, bear- 

10 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ing the same name, continued to show substantial interest in the 
company throughout his long life, and now the third of that name, 
the grandson, likewise shows evidence of continuous interest. Al- 
though living at a distance, he maintains the reputation of his 
grandfather and father in generosity, influence and integrity. 
Thus the Richardson family has taken justifiable pride in the or- 
ganization, and it is a pleasing commentary on American life to- 
day to witness such ample evidences of loyalty where worthy sons 
maintain the ideals of honored ancestors. 

Friends and associates of the senior Dr. Richardson shared 
their interest in the company by donating medals, notably Cyrus 
Wakefield, Lucius Beebe and George O. Carpenter, all of whom 
were identified with Wakefield's v/elfare. Later on. Col. Edward 
J. Gihon and other friends ofi'ered prizes in various lines of com- 
petition. The Fine Members Association, comprising citizens in- 
terested in the Richardson Light Guard, and the Lady Associates 
or the active company have been ever loyal to the company's in- 
terests and furnish moral and financial support to a degree un- 
equalled in military organizations. 




R. L. G. War Captains 

Left to right: John W. Locke, Civil War; Edward J. Gihon, 

Spanish War; Edward J. Connelly, World War; 

Samuel F. Littlefield, Civil War 



CHAPTER ONE 

1901 

COMPANY A'S GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY 

On October 11, 1901, the Richardson Light Guard's Fiftieth 
Anniversary passed very successfully and was a notable event in 
local history. The weather was perfect, the program was well 
carried out, and everything went smoothly. 

Many distinguished m.ilitary guests graced the occasion by 
their presence and a large number of former citizens who had 
been members of the company, were here to renew old acquain- 
tances and participate in the day's festivities. The affair proved to 
be a grand reunion and will ever be remembered as an event of 
rare pleasure. 

The parade was an interesting feature of the celebration. 
There were hundreds of visitors in town and "all turned out" to 
see the R. L. G. and their distinguished guests. The procession 
was made up as follov^^s : 

Platoon of Police. 

Salem Cadet Band, Jean Missud, Leader. 

Invited Guests (in carriages). 

Fine Members — Spanish War Veterans, Past Members, Capt, 
George M. Tompson, Commanding. 

Company A, Sixth Infantry, M. V. M., Capt. Frank E. Gra.y. 
Commanding. 

1st Platoon, 1st Lt. E. E. Morrison. 

2nd Platoon, 2nd Lt. J. H. McMahon. 

Along the route of procession the decorations were profuse 
and in some respects unusuall}^ elaborate. The Armory was at- 
tractively decorated in red, white and blue. The principal fea- 
ture of the decorations was a large shield with colored electric in- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

candescent lights. On the shield the various designations of the 
company appeared as follows: 

1851 Co. D. 7th Regt. Inf. M. V. M. 

1861 Co. B 5th Regt. Inf. Mass. U. S. Vols. 

1862 Co. E. 50th Regt. Inf. Mass. U. S. Vols. 
1864 Co. E. 8th Regt. Inf. Mass. U. S. Vols. 
1866 Co. A. 6th Regt. Inf. Mass. V. M. 

1898 Co. A. 6th Regt. Inf. Mass. U. S. Vols. 

The electrical effect was very fine and was the work of Mr. 
Robert J. Lawder. The Town Hall had appropriate decorations, 
a large portrait of the late Dr. Solon O. Richardson, Sr., appeared 
over the main entrance, surmounted by a "Welcome" electric sign 
tastefully arranged. Other unusually attractive decorations along 
the route were the Henry F. Miller & Sons Piano Factory, Cutler 
Bros. Block, Trader's Block, Walton's Block, Connell's Block, 
Cate's Block, J. S. Bonney's Drug Store, the Old P. O. Building, 
Gould Building, Jordan Building, "The Elms" the residence of 
S. O. Richardson, G. A. R. Hall and many residences. 

The procession passed in review on Main Street near the 
common. In the reviewing stand were the following: 

Lt. Governor John L. Bates and staff. Adjutant General Sam- 
uel Dalton, Inspector General William H. Brigham, Col. James 
G. White, Lt. Col. Edward J. Gihon, Lt. Col. Arthur B. Denny, Lt. 
Col. William C. Capelle, Surgeon General Robert A. Blood, Ma- 
jor Charles S. Proctor, Major George E. Hagar, A. D. C, Lt. Col. 
George H. Benyon. 

Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Mathews, Lt. Col. Walter C. Hagar, 
Capt. William B. Emery and Capt. William O. Webber, 1st 
Brigade. 

Col. William H. Oakes, Capt. Charles T. Dukelon and Capt. 
Thomas McCarthy, 5th Inf. 

Capt. John Boardman, 26th U. S. Inf. 

Major John J. Sullivan and Capt. William J. Casey, 9th Inf. 

Dept. Commander S. A. Barton, Junior Vice Commander 
Judd, Asst. Adj. General Proble, Judge Advocate Keyes, Chaplain 
Charles H. Hickok. Staff of G. A. R. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Col. Charles K. Darling and Capt. Barrett, 6th Inf. 

Capt. P. Frank Packard, 8th Inf. 

Lieut. Fred B. Carpenter, 1st Corps Cadets. 

Solon O. Richardson. 

After passing in review the procession marched to the park^ 
b}' Lakeside, where the ceremony of evening parade was held, 
Capt. Frank E. Gray, Acting Major; Lieut. Louis G. Hunton, 
6th Regt. Staff, Battalion Adjutant; Battalion Staff, Sergeant Ma- 
jor, Edgar O. Dewey. 

The ceremony being ended the column was again formed and 
marched to the armory to partake of a sumptuous banquet served 
by Caterer Dill of Melrose. During the banquet music was fur- 
nished by the Salem Cadet Band. After all had satisfied the in- 
ner man cigars were lighted and Capt. Gray in a fitting introduc- 
tory speech introduced as toastmaster of the evening, Mr. Edson 
W. White, who fulfilled the duties admirably. Mr. White allud- 
ed to Capt. Sam Littlefield, Lt. B. F. Barnard, Ex-Capt. E. J. 
Gihon and the present incumbent, Capt. Frank E. Gray in his in- 
tioductory, bring forth enthusiastic applause. 

Capt. Henry D. Degen of Boston referred to the early history 
of the R. L. G. 

Chairman Richard S. Stout of the Board of Selectmen spoke 
for the town and expressed the sentiment of Wakefield citizens 
regarding their high esteem of Company A. 

Brig. General Thomas R. Mathews, 1st Brigade Mass. Vol. 
Militia said the trip about town was an ample object lesson of the 
interest of Wakefield citizens in the local company. 

Lt. Gov. John L. Bates made a characteristic speech, con- 
gratulating the company upon its excellent record and speaking 
interestingly upon the "citizen soldiers". 

Col. Charles K. Darling 6th Regt. Inf. M. V. M. spoke in a 
reminiscent vein, referring to the regiment's rifle work and stated 
that the victories were due largely to the work of Company A's 
marksmanship, and also noting the attendance at State Musters, 
m which respect Company A set the standard. 

Cong! E. W. Roberts spoke for the United States and was 
pleased to note local pride in the home Military Company. 

15 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

"The Fine Members" of Company A was responded to by 
Samuel K. Hamilton, Esq., who spoke brilliantly and interspersed 
his remarks by clever stories. In responding. Squire Hamilton 
resorted to the dictionary, but found no satisfactory definition of 
the word "fine" but was glad to speak a good word for the Rich- 
ardson Light Guard praising its past history and its present con- 
dition. 

Col. Nathan P. Colburn of Minnesota was the next speaker. 
He was one of the most notable guests present, as he presided at 
the meeting Oct. 1st, 1851 when the first steps were taken to or- 
ganize the R. L. G. being Colonel of the 7th Regt. at that time 
He was given a cordial greeting. 

Mr. White then read the names of the prize winners at the 
Target Shoot held in the morning and the prizes were awarded. 

The result of the match between the rifle team of Company A 
and the team of the past members who styled themselves the 
"Has Beens" was then read, resulting in a victory for the Active 
Team, by the record breaking score of 648. The conditions were 
15 men, 10 shots at 200 yds. The scores: 



Company A 




The "Has Beens" 




Pvt. Gibson 


Kl 


Lt. Williams 


46 


Pvt. Cronin 


46 


G. Duward 


. 45 


Pvt. J efts .... 


45 


C. E. Horton 


. 43 


Capt. Gray 


4=5 


J. Duward 


43 


Pvt. Reid .... 


44 


Capt Hamilton 


43 


Sgt. Keough 


44 


John Reid 


42 


Cpl. Dingle 


4-! 


Col. Gihon 


42 


Bug. Bourgeois 


44 


C. Pratt ... 


42 


Pvt. Chesley 


44 


C. J. Tabbutt 


42 


Pvt. Widen 


42 


C. W. Parker 


41 


Sgt. Sweetser 


41 


A. R. Sedgley 


40 


Cpl. W. G. Hunt 


4! 


W. B. Daniels 


4<) 


Pvt. R. A. Merrill 


4! 


Capt. Cheney 


39 


Lt. McMahon 


41 


John W. Babbitt 


41 


Lt. E. E. Morrison 


40 


Lt. Hunton 


41 



648 630 

After a few remarks by Capt. Frank E. Gray relative to the 
memorial volume the banquet was concluded. 

Guests and past members lingered for a while to talk over 
"Old Days" and then all adjourned to the brilliantly illuminated 
and richly decorated Town Hall, for the festivities of the evening. 

16 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The Concert and ball was a grand success. Chesley's Or- 
chestra of 12 pieces furnished delightful music. Many military 
officers were present, and their rich uniforms and the handsome 
gowns of the ladies present made a pleasing scene, long to be re- 
membered by all. 



CHAPTER TWO 

1902 

ANNUAL ELECTIONS 

Annual elections were held the first week in January of each 
year, when the Treasurer's report was read and the following- 
committees elected by the members: Executive Committee, Inves- 
tigating Committee and Treasurer. There were three members 
elected to each of the above committees by ballot. Considerable 
ihterest was shown at these elections and more or less rivalry. 




Capt. John H. McMahon 

Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., 

1902 - 1914 

Major, 1st Bii., 6th Mass. 

Inf., N. G. 1914 - 1915 

Major State Guard 

Lt.-Col. M. V. M. Eetired 

List 



The annual Regimental Inspection was held on January 6, 
1902 at which the company made a very good showing. The 
inspecting officer was Lt. Col. George H. Priest. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Feb. 14. Company assembled at the armory at 1.45 P. M. 
tCf attend the funeral services of one of the Company's best friends, 
Captain James H. Carter. Services were held in the Town Hall. 

Feb. 24. Election was held to fill vacancy caused by the res- 
ignation and discharge of Capt. Frank E. Gray. Meeting called 
to order at 8.20 P. M., Major Warren E. Sweetser, presiding. 
Lieut. John H. McMahon elected Captain unanimously and 
Pvt. Alton R. Sedgley was elected 2nd Lieutenant. 

April 7. Annual State Inspection, Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison 
Commanding Company. 

ANNUAL PRIZE DRILL 

April 16. Annual r-*rize Drill and distribution of Marks- 
xnan's Badges, the affair being complimentary to the Fine Mem- 
bers of the Company, a large number of whom were present with 
ladies. The Company had the highest total of points in the State 
for marksmanship. The marksman's badges and prizes were 
presented by Capt. George M. Tompson. The trophy won in 
the Regimental Shoot held at Lexington on Oct. 14, 1901 was also 
presented to the Company. The company was also awarded the 
trophy emblematic of the Championship of the Eastern Middlesex 
Military League, a statuette, "a La Chasse". In this competition the 
Company Rifle Team shot in ten matches and won by a clean 
score, having been victorious in every match of the series. The 
high standard of efficiency achieved by the Company for the past 
3ear was due to the commander Capt. John H. McMahon who 
had charge of the qualifications. 

May 19. A meeting was held for the purpose of electing a 
ist Lieut, in place of 1st Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison, resigned and 
discharged. Major Warren E. Sweetser presided. Meeting 
-called to order at 8.10 P. M. Pvt. Harvey G. Brockbank was 
■declared elected. 

May 30. Companv A performed the usual escort duty to 
Post 12 G. A. R. 

19 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
CAMP DUTY 

June 6. Company assembled for annual tour of Camp dut)^ 
at Framingham, Mass., leaving armory at 4.15 p. m. and taking 
the 4.36 train for Boston. Arrived at North Station at 5.14, and 
marched to the South Union Station. The Second Battalion, of 
which Company A was a part, under command of Major Warren 
E. Sweetser, left the camp grounds at 9.15 a. m. June 9th for 
instruction in extended order at Water Tower Hill, returning 
to camp at noon the next day. The balance of the tour was taken 
up by regular drills and brigade reviews. The company returned 
home Saturday, June 13, at 6.00 p. m. 

June 17. The Company assembled at 8.30 a. m. and partici- 
pated in the parade and exercises at the dedication of the Soldiers' 
Monument on the common. 

ANNUAL TARGET SHOOT AND BANQUET 

Oct. 17. Annual Target Shoot and Banquet was held on this 
date. The target shoot was held in Cox's Woods in the afternoon. 
Banquet at the Armory at 5.00 p. m. Mr. William L. Coon was 
toastmaster. The speakers were Capt. G. M. Tompson, Chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen: Col. James G. White of Gov. 
Crane's Staff; Gen. Thonias A. Matthews, 1st Brigade; Congress- 
man Roberts and Comrade Castle of the Ohio G. A. R. In the 
evening a concert and military ball took place in the town hall. 
Capt. John H. McMahon was floor director. During the concert 
there was an exhibition drill and guard mount by the company, 
and prizes won at the target shoot were presented by Col. Edward 
J Gihon. Dancing followed. 

190] 

March 23. The annual State Inspection by Lt. Col. Walter 
C. Hagar accompanied by Maj. William D. Emery 1st Brigade 
Staif and .Major Warren E. Sweetser of the 6th Regt. 

April 23. Annual Prize Drill and presentation of Marks- 
man's badges. A large number of Fine Members, ladies, and 

20 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

comrades from Post 12 G. A. R. attended. William L. Coon of 
Post 12 G. A. R. presented the prizes and badges. Every man in 
the company qualified as marksmen or better, making a total of 
314 against a total of 265 for 1901. 

May 30. Company acted as escort to Post 12 G. A. R. A 
substantial lunch was served at the armory at 12 noon. 

June 1. Company A appropriated the sum of |15.00 to 
affiliate with the National Rille Association. Each member was 
assessed 25 cents to help pay the expense of sending the National 
Rifle Team, of which Sgt. Keough v/as a member, to England. 

CAMP DUTY 

June 20. Company assembled for eight days' duty at camp 
in Framingham. Left Wakefield at 8.15 a. m., arrived at camp 




■i ,< L 



Co. A, 6th Inf., M. V. M., at Framingham, June, 1903 



at 10.50 a. m. Tuesday, June 23rd, Brigade was reviewed by 
Lt. General Nelson A. Miles commanding the army of the United 

21 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

States. Thursday, June 25, the brigade left camp about 8 a. m. 
for Boston to take part in the Hooker parade, and returned to 
camp about 4 p. m. Saturday, June 27, the Company returned 
to Wakefield, arriving at noon. During this tour Company A 
had the honor of being color company. 

RECEPTION TO SOT. KEOUGH 

August 7. Q. M. Sgt. James M. Keough was tendered a 
reception and banquet by the members of Company A at the 
armory. The affair was in honor of Sgt. Keough's distinguished 
record at Bisley, England, where the American Rifle Team won 
the Palma Trophy international competition on July 11 and 
Sgt. Keough, the only representative from New England, made the 
highest score. It was an informal affair but none the less sin- 
cere. Several prominent military guests and Wakefield citizens 
spoke in appreciation of Sgt. Keough's remarkable career as a 
marksman. After a brief reception the banquet followed in the 
reading room where Caterer Flockton served an appetizing spread. 
About the head table were festoons of bunting and attractive dec- 
orations, the score of Sgt. Keough being reproduced on a minia- 
ture target. Capt. McMahon called the gathering to order and 
introduced Col. Charles K. Darling commanding the regiment, 
who paid a high tribute to Sgt. Keough for his skill and success 
with the rifle. Sgt. Keough responded and expressed his appre- 
ciation for the kindness shown him and reviewed his trip and the 
work of the team. Col. Edward J. Gihon of Gov. Bates' Staff, 
and Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, also spoke in praise of 
Sgt. Keough's ability. Other speakers of the evening were Major 
Warren E. Sweetser, Lt. McMillan, I. R. P., Lt. Joseph Hart, Asst. 
Surgeon, and Harris M. Dolbeare. 

Oct. 2. The company left for Boston for escort duty to the 
Honorable Artillery Company of London, England. Detach- 
ments from the First Corps of Cadets, 1st, 5th, 6th and 9th Regts, 
about 2000 men, were in line. The march started about ten 
o'clock and covered a route of three miles, the assembly taking 
place in Charlestown. The parade was reviewed by Gov. John 

22 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

L. Bates and staff at the State House and by the Mayor of Boston, 
at City Hall. Company arrived back at the armory at 1.30 p. m. 
Oct. 21. Annual Fall Field Day and Ball of the Company 
took place on this date. Target shoot as usual at the range 
in Cox's woods. Banquet was served in the armory at 5.30 p. m. 
by Caterer Dill of Melrose. Samuel K. Hamilton, Esq., was 
toastmaster. The speakers were Judge Advocate General Henry 
S. Dewey, Congressman Ernest W. Roberts, Brig. Gen. G. A. 




1st Lt. H. G. Brockbank 

Co. A, 6th Mass. Eegt., 
M. V. M. 



' 'A 



2nd Lt. Alton R. Sedgley 

Co. A, 6th Mass. Eegt., M. V. M. 



Goodale, U. S. A. J. V. Dept. Commander James H. Wolfe, G. A. 
R., and Lt. Col. Edward J. Gihon. The toastmaster awarded 
the prizes after which the guests adjourned to the Town Hall 
where the Ball was held. It was largely attended and a grand 
success. 

Dec. 7. In place of regular drill the Company went to Wo- 
burn on invitation of Company G. 5th Regt. and took part in a 
street parade, the occasion being the opening night of a fair held 
by Company G. 



23 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

1904 

January 4. Annual Regimental Inspection at armory by 
Major Cyrus H. Cook, 6th Inf. M. V. M. 

Feb. 26. Exhibition drill and dance at the armory. 

Mar. 14. Annual State Inspection by Lt. Col. Charles F. 
Wonson of Gov. Bates' Staff and Capt. F. W. Phisterer of the 
Artillery Corps. U. S. A. Major Warren E. Sweetser of the 
■6th Regt. Inf., was also present. 

April 16. Funeral of the late Capt. Albert Mansfield was 
held at the residence, Mansfield Corner, So. Lynnfield. Com- 
pany was represented by Capt. McMahon and Lt. Brockbank, and 
a squad under command of Sgt. Walter G. Hunt fired three volleys 
■over the grave. 

April 25. Annual Prize Drill and Distribution of Marks- 
man's badges was held at the armory. A large number of friends 
•of the company, Fine Members and comrades from Post 12 G. A. 
R. were present. Supt. of Schools A. C. Thompson presented 
the prizes and badges. Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough and Corp. 
J. J. Cronin were presented with cups won at the State General 
Competition for being among the fifteen competitors making the 
highest scores. Corp. Cronin v/as also presented with the second 
ifidividual medal and the Distinguished Marksman's Medal won 
at the same competition. 

TRl-COLOR PRESENTATION 

May 2. Sixty men of Company A under 1st Sgt. Edward ]. 
Connelly proceeded to the South Armory, Irvington St., Boston, at 
5.30 p. m., reporting to Capt. McMahon where a provisional 
battalion of Companies E. L. A and H, under the command of 
Major Cyrus H. Cook 6th Regt. gave a battalion drill, guard 
mount and escort to the colors. This last ceremony concluded 
with the transfer of the Tri-color from the Second Infantry to the 
winners of 1903, the Sixth Infantry. Battalion parade followed 
■during which the members of the victorious Tri-color team were 
presented with pins representing State colors with Tri-color at- 
tached. Eight of the fifteen men were from Company A. 

24 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Previous to the drill the officers of the Regiment entertained the 
n-embers of the rifle team with a lunch at the Copley Square Hotel. 
Col. Charles K. Darling presented a statuette to Q. M. Sgt. James- 
H. Keough of Co. A in recognition of his skill in making the high- 
est score on the American Rifle Team in the International match 
at Bisley, England, July 11, 1903. 

May 21. Company A left on a special electric car at 1.00 
p. m. for Tyngsboro, Mass., arriving at 3.30 p. m. A battalion 
consisting of Cos. A. G. and H of the 6th Regt. and M of the 9th 
Regt. under Major Warren E. Sweetser made an assault on a hill 
held by Co. C of the 6th Regt. Blank ammunition was used, the 
action lasting about one hour. Supper was served at 6.00 p. m. 
and Company A left for home at 7.30 p. m. 

May 30. Company A performed the usual escort duty to 
Post 12, G. A. R. 

June 11. The company left at 7.30 a. m. for eight days' 
annual camp duty at So. Framingham, arriving at camp grounds 
at 10.15 a. m. On the afternoon of Tuesday, June 14, Flag Day 
was observed with a Brigade Review and escort to the colors. A 
salute of twenty-one guns was fired by the Artillery. The usual 
program of camp duty was carried out during this tour. Com- 
pany arrived home 12.45 p. m., Saturday, June 18th. 

August 6. Company A with Company E of the 5th Regt., 
Co. K, 8th Regt., and Company M, 8th Regt., under command of 
Major Edward H. Eldredge, 8th Regt., acted as funeral escort ta 
the remains of the late Major Oliver H. Story, Asst. Insp. of Rifle 
Practise, 2nd Brigade. 

Sept. 19. Annual Regimental Competition, Bay State Range. 

Oct. 1. State General Rifle Competition, Bay State Range. 

ANNUAL FIELD DAY 

Oct. 13. The annual Fall Field Day and Banquet was held 
on this date with a target shoot at the Bay State Range in the 
afternoon. An informal reception was held between five and 
six o'clock at the armory followed by a banquet prepared by 
Jesse A. Dill of Melrose. Mr. A. C. Thompson, Supt. of Schools- 

25 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

■was toastmaster. The speakers were General Henry S. Dewey o" 
the Governor's Staff, General Greenleaf A. Goodale, U. S. A., re- 
tired; William L. Coon of Post 12 G. A. R.; Nathaniel E. Cutler, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen; Lt. Col. Walter G. Sanborn, 
Asst. y\dj. Gen.; Capt. Morton Cobb, Aide 2nd Brig., and Lt. 
Fred H. Turnbull, Naval Brig. Chesley's orchestra furnished ex- 
cellent music. 

1905 

January 16. The committee in charge recommended that the 
Washington trip be made, subject to conditions v/hich were sub- 
mitted at the meeting. 

January 30. Company was inspected by Major Warren E. 
Sweetser, this inspection taking the place of the usual regimental 
inspection. 

March 13. On this evening the State Inspection took place. 
Lt. Col. Edward J. Gihon A. 1. G. was inspecting officer. Major 
Warren E. Sweetser, 5th Regt. and an officer from the 15th U. S. 
Cavalry were present. 

WASHINGTON TRIP 

March 1. Thirty-seven men of the company with Capt. 
McMahon and Lt. Sedgley, as part of the Provisional Regiment 
under .Major Perley A. Dyar of the 1st Artillery, left for Wash- 
ington, D. C, to take part in the inaugural exercises. The regi- 
jTient left Boston for Fall River at 6.45 p. m. and embarked on 
the steamer Pilgrim of the Fall River Line for New York. The 
steamer was somewhat delayed in the Sound by ice. On arrival 
-at New York the troops were transferred to Jersey City on a spe- 
cial steamer and entrained at 9.37 a. m., March 2, leaving by the 
Baltimore & Ohio railroad. Philadelphia was reached at 12.30 
p. m. and Baltimore at 3.45 p. m., where a short stop was made. 
The train reached Washington at 5.45 p. m. The Regiment 
imarched to the armory of the National Rifles located at D Street 
>J. W. between 9th and 10th Streets, where the company was 

26 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

quartered. March 3 was spent in sight seeing. On Saturday. 
March 4th, Inauguration Day, the company had its photograph 
taken at 11.30 a. m. At 12.00 noon the Provisional Regiment 
was marched to the assembly point and was formed sixteen fileix 
fiont, companies closed to eight paces. After passing in review 
before President Roosevelt, double time was taken for a short 
distance, when they were again reviewed by Lt. Gen. A. R. Chaf- 
fee, Chief of Staff, U. S. A. Company arrived back at their 
quarters at 5.30 p. m., having marched about ten miles. The 
Massachusetts troops were in heavy marching order, with blue 
overcoats and collar rolls, making a fine appearance. The align- 
ment was excellent. Sunday, March 5 was spent in visiting pub- 
lic buildings and other places of interest. Monday morning at 
4.30 a. m. preparations were made for departure. The train 
k:ft Washington at 7.00 a. mi., Philadelphia being reached at 
11.00 a. m., where the men were given two hours' liberty. At 
2.00 p. m. the train left for Jersey City which was reached at 
4.30 p. m. Crossing to New York, the Fall River Line Steamer 
Pilgrim was again boarded, and at 5.30 headed down the river. 
Capt. McMahon was Officer of the Day. The steamer arrived 
at Fall River, Tuesday, at 6.15 a. m. and the 7.00 a. m. train was 
taken for Boston. Company A arrived in Wakefield at 10.30 a. m. 

March 28. The company acted as escort to the remains of 
Capt. S. F. Littlefield, a former commander of Company A. His 
picture in the armory was draped for thirty days. 

April 26. Annual Prize Drill and Presentation of Marks- 
men's Badges, took place this evening before a large gallery of 
friends of the members, a large cfelegation from Post 12 G. A. R. 
und the High School Battalion. William L. Coon of Post 12 pre- 
sented the medals and badges. 

May 30. Company A acted as escort to Post 12 G. A. R. 

CAMP DUTY 

July 5 to 13. The annual tour of duty took place at Hamp- 
ton Plains, Westfield, Mass. Company A left Boston at 9.10^ 
a. m. arriving at Westfield at 12.20 p. m. A march of three miles. 

27 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

was taken to camp. All the troops with the exception of the 1st 
Regt. Heavy Art. and the Naval Brigade were organized into a 
division under command of Lt. Gen. Nelson A. Miles, U. S. A. 
Retired. Work was at once begun clearing the ground of brush 
and pitching wall tents. Service uniform with collar roll was 
v/orn. Little time was spent in Company instruction. Regi- 
mental and Brigade drills in extended order, advance guard and 
outpost work were taken up. Friday, July 7, the Division was re- 
viewed by Gov. William L. Douglass. Tuesday, July 11, the 
tour of duty came to a close with a spectacular night attack upon 
the camp. Company A arrived home Wednesday at 7.50 p. m 



FALL FIELD DAY 

Oct. 12. Annual Fall Field Day and Banquet was observed 
in the usual manner with a rifle competition at the Bay State 
Range and a banquet in the evening at the armory. Jesse A. Dili 
of Melrose was caterer. There were over two hundred present. 
Music was furnished by Chesley's Orchestra. Rev. William T. 
O'Connor of St. Joseph's Church invoked the divine blessing. The 
speakers were Col. F. J. Gihon of Gov. Douglas' Staff, Gen. G. A. 
Goodale, Col. George H. Priest 6th Regt., Lt. J. J. Dwyer, Adj. 
Gen. Spanish War Vet., Selectman Thomas G. O'Connell, Rev. 
Flugh A. Heath, Commander Charles A. Evans, G. A. R., Charles 
H. Howe, and H. M. Dolbeare. William L. Coon of Post 12 act- 
ed as toastmaster. 



1906 

Feb. 12. Regimental inspection by Maj. James C. Smith 6th 
Regt. Dress uniforms with canteen and haversack, and black 
shoes were worn. At a meeting after the inspection it was voted 
to assist the Spanish War Veterans at their coming fair and take 
charge of a table. 

April 11. The State Inspection was held, Inspecting Officer. 

28 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Col. Edward J. Gihon retired, accompanied by Capt. Field, 5th 
U. S. Infantr}'-. 

April 22. The Company performed escort duty at the 
funeral of Capt. James F. Emerson, a former commander of Com- 
pany A. 






'"""^^m^mM 



Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., M. V. M., at Framingham, 1906 



April 24. Company A with Company G of the 5th and 
Company H of the 6th Inf., was escort to Lt. Gen. Nelson A. 
Miles, U. S. A. Rtd., at the opening night of the L. S. W. V. Fair, 
Town Hall. 

May 11. Annual Prize Drill and Presentation of Marks- 
man's badges. The competitive drill in the manual of arms 
followed a brief exhibition drill under Capt. McMahon. Post- 
master Dearborn presented the prizes. 

May 30. Company A acted as escort to Post 12 G. A. R. 
29 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
CAMP DUTY 

June 16 to 23. Annual Camp Duty was held at South Fram- 
ingham. Particular attention was given to close and extended 
order work, also outpost duty by the battalion. On Friday, June 
22nd, Gov. Curtis Guild and Staff reviewed the Regiment and 
the Governor presented the Regiment with a new stand of colors. 
On Saturday, June 23rd, the company left by special electric car 
at 9.20 a. m. for the North Station where the 10.55 train was taken 
to Wakefield. 

FUNERAL OF GEN. RICE 

July 24. In accordance with special orders from the Govern- 
or, the 6th Regt. M. V. M. acted as escort to the remains of Gen. 
Edmund Rice, U. S. A. retired, who died at Wakefield, July 21. 
Funeral services were held at the General's home in Greenwood. 
The Grand Army ritual was used, after which Gov. Guild spoke 
eloquently of this worthy officer. Mus. James Findlay of Com- 
pany A sounded taps. The body was escorted to the State House 
by U. S. and State troops under command of Brig. Gen. Charles 
K. Darling M. V. M. Retired. The body lay in state for two 
hours in Memorial Hall. Soon after 6.00 p. m. the cortage 
m.oved from the State House to the South Station where the re- 
mains were taken on the Federal Express to Washington for inter- 
ment in the National Cemetery at Arlington. Company A was 
detailed to escort the body from the General's home in Greenwood 
to Boston, and six of its non-commissioned officers were detailed as 
body bearers. The Company also acted as guard of honor at the 
State House while the body lay in state. Company A furnished 
the flag which draped the casket and which was taken with it to 
Washington. 

ANNUAL BANQUET 

Oct. 11. As in past years the company received the usual 
donation of |50.00 from Solon O. Richardson. On this day was 
held the annual Fall Field Day and Banquet. The target shoot 

30 



History Of Richardson Light Guaru 

tc'tking place at Bay State Range in the afternoon and the ban 
quet at the armory in the evening. Jesse A. Dill of Melrose act- 
ed as caterer. Music was furnished by the Lynn Cadet Orches- 
tra. Rev. H. A. Heath invoked the blessing. William L. Coon 
of Post 12 acted as toastmaster, in his usual pleasing manner. The 
speakers were Hon. Ernest W. Roberts, M. C; Thomas G. O'Con- 
nell, Chairman of Selectmen; Capt. John H. McMahon; Charles 
A. Evans, Com. of Post 12 G. A. R.; Col. Edward J. Gihon, Re- 
tired; Col. George H. Priest, 6th Regt., and the Rev. William R. 
Polhamus. 

Nov. 5. It was voted to arrange a series of shooting contests 
on the armory range. 



31 



CHAPTER THREE 
1907 

Jan. 7. At a regular meeting the Executive Committee was 
instructed to purchase miscellaneous gymnasium apparatus. 

Jan. 22. Company A took part in the parade at Stoneham 
at the opening night of a fair held by Company H 6th Regt. 
M. V. M. 

Jan. 31. Marksman's badges for the year of 1906 were pre- 
sented on this evening. Capt. Stuart W. Wise ISAP 6th Regt. 
M. V. M. after words of congratulation, presented the badges. 
Dancing followed, the music being furnished by the Lynn Cadet 
Orchestra. The company in 1906 had 23 expert riflemen, 4 
sharpshooters and 30 marksmen. 

Feb. 11. Regimental inspection of the Company by Major 
Warren E. Sweetser, 6th Regt. 

Feb. 26. The U. S. Inspection took place on this evening 
by Lt. G. Van S. Quackenbush, 23rd U. S. Inf. Dress uniform 
with white gloves was worn. Canteen and haversack were 
carried. 

April 15. Company assembled for State Inspection by Lt. 
Col. Roger Wolcott, General Staff. Col. Priest, Lt. Col. Cook, 
Major Sweetser, Capt. Hunton, and Lt. Downes were present as 
observers. 

April 29. At the regular meeting it was voted to dispose of 
the two shares of stock in the Bay State Rifle Range, and a com- 
mittee appointed for this purpose. 

May 3. The annual prize drill was held on Friday evening 
at the Armory. Gen. Goodale presented the prizes, after which 
dancing was enjoyed until 12.00 o'clock. The Lynn Cadet Or- 
chestra furnished the music. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

May 27. The compan)^ was measured for the new full dress 
uniform. 

May 30. Comp .^y A escorted Post 12 G. A. R. at their 
exercises. 

June 10. A special meeting was called for the purpose of 
electing a second lieutenant in place of Lt. Alton R. Sedgley, re- 
signed and discharged. Major Warren E. Sweetser presided 
First Sergeant Edward J. Connelly Vv'as unanimously elected. 

CAMP DUTY 

July 27 to August 3. Company A left for South Framing- 
ham, Mass., July 27, for seven days' State Duty. A special electric 
car was taken at the North Station for the camp grounds. Most 
of the program for the week consisted of battalion drills, advance 
guard formations and extended order work. On Saturday, 
August 3, the Brigade entrained for Boston to take part in the 
Old Home Week celebration at which the entire Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia was assembled. The troops detrained at 
Huntington Avenue yard and paraded through the principal busi- 
ness streets of Boston, being reviewed by the Mayor of Boston, 
Lt. General Nelson A. Miles and Gov. Curtis Guild. The First 
Brigade was dismissed at 12.45 p. m.. Company A returning to 
Wakefield on the 1.25 train. The day was exceedingly hot. 

ANNIVERSARY BANQUET 

Oct. 9. The Fifty-sixth annual target shoot and banquet was 
held on Wednesday, the target shoot at the Bay State Range in 
the afternoon and the banquet in the evening. Jesse A. Dill was 
caterer. Mr. William L. Coon of Post 12 G. A. R. acted as 
toastmaster. The speakers were Hon. W. M. Olin, Secretary of 
State, Selectm.an A. L. Wiley, J. L. Parker, J. V. C. Mass. G. A. R. 
Chaplain W. F. Dusseault, C. A. Evans, Com. of Post 12; Jesse 
A. Haley, Com. U. S. W. V., John E. Oilman, Past Dept. Com.. 
G A. R., Col. E. J. Gihon, Stanley B. Dearborn, Post 12, Col. 
Priest, 6th Regt.; Gen. G. A. Goodale and Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, 

33 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

U. S. A., retired. A donation of $50.00 was received from 
Solon O. Richardson. 

Dec. 2. At the regular meeting Sgt. Edgar B. Hawkes, Team 
Captain, in behalf of the Rifle Team, presented the company the 
trophy won at the Regimental Shoot, Sept. 30, 1907, an engraving 
representing the recapture of Fort Sumpter by the United States^ 
Squadron in April, 1863. 

1908 . 

Jan. 14. Annual Federal inspection took place on Tuesday 
evening. Inspecting Officer 1st Lieut. C. J. Nelson, 24th Inf. 
U. S. A. Present 3 officers and 56 men. 

Feb. 20. A dancing party held by Company A at the armory 
was a grand success. The armory was beautifully decorated with, 
bunting and potted plants. Dancing was enjoyed by a large 
number of people. Excellent music was furnished by Lynn Ca- 
det Orchestra. 

Feb. 22. On Washington's Birthday Capt. McMahon, Lts. 
Brockbank and Connelly, in full dress uniform, attended a recep- 
tion given by Gov. Curtis Guild, Jr., at the State F^ouse, Boston, 
Mass. 

March 23. Lt. Col. Roger Wolcott of the General Staff, M. 
V M., inspected Company A on this evening. Present three 
officers and fifty-six enlisted men. 

MARKSMEN'S BADGES 

March 30. The presentation of Marksman's decorations 
and a military Gymkhana were held at the armory this evening 
ii; the presence of a large audience. Among the guests were Gen. 
Goodale retired, Col. Edward J. Gihon and representatives from 
Post 12 G. A. R., Camp 39, U. S. W. V., and the Wakefield High 
School Battalion. After a short company drill the marksman's, 
badges were presented to the company by Col. Edward J. Gihon. 
WHO in the course of his remarks stated that at the close of the 
target season in 1907 every man in the company was qualified in 
the Marksman's class or better and that at the Regimental Com- 

34 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



petition the Company had won the State Trophy with the record 
breaking score of 645 points. Then followed the athletic events 
which consisted of: Blank Cartridge Race, Equipment Race, Po- 
tato Race, Rescue Race, Three-legged Race, and Relay Race. 

April 27. Mr. Stillman J. Putney presented the Company 
with a ticket to a ball given by the Richardson Light Guard at 
South Reading in 1852, for which a vote of thanks was extended. 

May 11. On this evening the annual Prize Drill was held, 
attended by a large number of friends and delegations from Post 
12 G. A. R. and other patriotic organizations. Gen. Goodale pre- 
sented the prizes. 




Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., M. V. M. 

In Full Dress L-niform, May 30, 1908, in front of Old Armory 

DRILL AT TEWKSBURY 

May 23. The Company assembled on Saturday for a bat- 
t^lion drill at Tewksbury, Mass. Service uniform was 
worn, with canteen and haversack, and shelter tent halves in col- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

lar roll were carried. 1"he company was transported in electric 
cars and the program consisted of problems in attack and defense 
•of position, advance guard, outpost work and shelter tent drill. 

May 30. The company paraded in full dress uniform, white 
gloves, military collars and black shoes, at the G. A. R. exercises. 



CAMP DUTY IN N. Y. 

June 13 to 21. The company assembled to perform eight 
days of State Duty in camp at Pine Plains, Jefferson County, N. 
Y. It is interesting to note that the company was equipped for 
the first time with the U. S. Magazine Rifle, Model 1903, cham- 
bered for model 1906 ammunition. The 1903 model cartridge 
belts with suspenders were also worn for the first time. The 
musicians were armed with 38 Cal. Colt service revolvers. Com- 
panies A, B, D, H and Headquarters were assigned to special 
train G which left at 4.30 p. m. from the North Station. Each 
man was allowed one seat in the coach, with car in charge of a 
Seigeant, who was responsible for the conduct of the men and the 
condition of the car. The officers rode in a Pullman sleeper in 
the rear of the train. Route followed: Fitchburg Division to 
Rotterdam Junction, N. Y., West Shore Line to Utica then up the 
Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg line to Carthage. The af- 
ternoon v^'as beautiful and the scenery much enjoyed. A full 
moon added to the charm of a June evening and the ride along the 
Deerfield and Hoosac Rivers was one long to be remembered. 
Supper was served at about 7.30 p. m., after which the men set- 
tled down for the night. Utica was reached at daylight Sunday 
morning, v^'here a short stop was made. Carthage was reached 
at about 8.15 a. m. and the train proceeded slowly to a temporary 
siding at Pine Camp. After a long wait for the arrival of the 
rest of the Regiment, under the boiling sun beside the railroad 
tracks, the march to camp was begun through the deep sand 
Company A was located in Infantry Camp No. 2 about one and 
one-half miles from the railroad. On the way the companv 
passed Major General Frederick D. Grant, U. S. A., who was in 
■command of the camp. The mess shack had been built and the 

37 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

company streets mapped out by U. S. Engineers. Tent pitching 
was progressing nicely when a most severe electric and wind storm 
broke over the camp, rain coming down in torrents and in a few 
moments every tent was blown to the ground and the occupants 
drenched. The storm, lasted over an hour and did a great deal of 
damage. Work was once more begun on pitching camp which 
was finished by sunset and huge fires built in the streets around 
which the men tried to dry themselves. The Massachusetts Regi- 
ments were in a Provisional Infantry Brigade consisting of the 
Second, Sixth and Eighth Mass. Regts. and 23rd N. Y. Inf., un- 
der command of Brig. Gen. E. P. Clark, M. V. M. All drills were 
suspended Monday morning so that the troops could properly 
dry clothing and equipment. Drills started in the afternoon and 
continued until the problem of Thursday. Advance Guard, out- 
post and extended order, by company, battalion and regiment, 
formed the program. Sgt. E. B. Hawkes of Company A was 
detailed as Sgt. Major of the first battalion during these drills. 

The problem Thursday consisted of an attack on a bridge 
ever the Black River which was held by a retreating Blue Army. 
The Brown Army of which the 6th Regt. was a part, left camp and 
marched northwest for about six miles, where shelter tents were 
pitched for the night. Next morning after a hurried breakfast 
the regiment went into action. The firing lasted until ten o'clock 
when cease firing was sounded and the troops marched back to 
camp in time for dinner. Saturday preparations were made 
for breaking camp and returning home. Shortly after one o'clock 
the "General" sounded and every tent was lowered to the ground 
and quickly rolled up ready for loading on the waiting mule 
wagons, to be carried to the train. At 4.30 p. m. the regiment 
marched to train G, being the last to leave at 7.00 p. m. During 
the journey home the U. S. Army travel ration was used and founa 
satisfactory. During the time spent in camp the men were 
issued the field ration by U. S. Army officers which system did not 
prove as satisfactory as that in previous years by our own Volun- 
teer officers. Boston was reached shortly after 9.00 a. m. Sunday, 
June 21st, and Wakefield at 10.32 a. m. 

38 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
ANNIVERSARY BANQUET 

Oct. 7. l~he fifty-seventh anniversary of the Richardson 
Light Guard was observed on this date. Following the custom of 
former years a target shoot was held at the range in the afternoon 
and a banquet in the evening at the armory. Dill of Melrose 
was caterer. Rev. John F. Meheran asked the Divine blessing. 
The decorations were very attractive. The Lynn Cadet Orchestra 
furnished the music during the evening. Mr. William L. Coon 
officiated as toastmaster. Toasts were responded to by Cong. 
Ernest W. Roberts, Capt. John H. McMahon, Chaplain W. F. 
Dusseault, 6th Regt. Commander Hickok, Post 12 G. A. R., Rev. 
Austin Rice, Arthur L. Wiley, Selectman, and Col. E. LeRoy 
Sweetser, 8th Regt. 

Oct. 26. A committee was appointed to purchase a model 
of the various rifles which had been used by the company. 

Dec. 28. It was unanimously voted to allow Lt. Brockbank 
instructor, the use of the 22 cal. Winchester rifles for the Wakefield 
High School Battalion in the matches at the Sportsman's Show in 
Boston. A picture of the rifle team of 1880 was presented to the 
company by Mr. William F. Barrett and four pictures of old 
military uniforms were also received from Mr. Louis Blumenthal. 

1909 

January 4. Lt. Brockbank told of the splendid shooting by 
Wakefield High School Cadets in the matches at the Sportsman's 
Show, Mechanics Building, Boston and thanked the compan}^ 
for the use of the rifles. 

Jan. 19. At the Federal Inspection on Tuesday evening Ma- 
jor Faisone, 24th Inf. U. S. A., ofliciated. Present 3 officers and 
55 enlisted men. 

Jan. 25. The executive committee was instructed to pur- 
chase a typewriter for the use of the company. 

INAUGURAL PARADE 

March 1. The company left to take part in the Inaugural 
Exercises at Washington, by the Fall River Line to New York and 

39 




Rifles Used by Richardson Light Guard 
Co. A, 6th Regt., Mass. Inf., N. G. 

From left to right: Rifle used in Revolutionary War; Spring- 
field Rifle used in Civil War; Springfield Rifle used in Spanish. 
War, Ramrod Bavonet;U. S. Magazine, Model 1898 (Krag) ; 
U. S. Magazine Model 1903 (Springfield 30 Cal.) 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Penn. Railroad to Washington. A stopover for two hours at 
Philadelphia being enjoyed in sightseeing. The company was 
•quartered at the residence of Mrs. Caroline Rickhart, Indiana 
Ave, N. W., near the U. S. Patent Office. 

On March 3 a violent snow storm did considerable damage, 
leaving the streets in wretched condition for the Inaugural Parade 
which was to take place on March 4. The company marched to 
the assembly point of the parade through deep slush and passed 
a most uncomfortable two hours before the march was taken up. 
T he company made a very creditable showing in passing in review 
before President Taft. The rest of the stay was taken up in 
visiting government buildings and points of interest. The com- 
pany returned by the same route, Penn. Railroad and Fall River 
Line to Boston. 

March 29. Lt. Col. E. W. M. Bailey of the General Staff, 
M. V. M. inspected Company A at the armory. Only forty- 
eight hours' notice of this inspection was given and alarm lists 
were used to notify the members. Nowithstanding the short 
notice the company passed a fine inspection. 

April 23. On Friday evening a squad under the command 
of 1st Sgt. W. G. Hunt contested with Company H, 6th Regt. in 
a drill at Melrose and won a silver loving cup which was pre- 
sented to the Company. The following composed the squad: 
Sgt. F. H. Rogers, Sgt. E. B. Hawkes, Sgt. E. J. Stark, Corp. John 
Findlay, Jr., and Pvts. H. G. Godfrey, H. M. Spear, A. J. Sullivan 
and W. 1. Sweetser. 

PRIZE DRILL 

April 28. A very successful Prize Drill and Dance took place 
at the armory on Wednesday evening. The attendance was 
large. Dr. Curtis L. Sopher, a Fine Member of the company, 
presented the prizes. Music for the dancing was by the Lynn 
Cadet Band. Admission was by invitation ticket, subscription 
being ladies twenty-five cents, gentlemen thirty-five cents. 

May 21. On this evening the company was presented with 
the marksman's decorations for the year 1908. In that year there 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

v/ere twenty-two experts, one sharpshooter, thirty-six marksmen, 
seven revolver experts and four revolver sharpshooters. This 
year for the first time, Sergeants and Musicians were allowed to 
qualify with the service revolver. 

May 31. Company A assisted Post 12 G. A. R. in the parade 
and decoration of the graves. 

June 12. Company A left at 1.00 p. m. for battalion drill 
ai Wilmington, Mass., for a problem in outpost work. 

OVERNIGHT TRIP 

July 17. About thirty members of Company A assembled 
at the armory at 7.00 p. m. and marched to the estate of Mrs. 
Albert Mansfield, South Lynnfield, where camp was pitched. Men 
were in service uniform and carried the complete field equipment. 
The buzzacott oven was used for cooking. Sunday afternoon ex- 
tended order, advance guard and outpost work was conducted b} 
Lt. Connelly. At 4.30 p. m. the march home began, a stop being 
Piade at Mr. Sylvester Burditt's who treated the members to de- 
licious lemonade. The armory was reached at 5.30 p. m. 

BATTALION DRILL 

July 24. A battalion drill was held at Foster's pond, An- 
dover, Mass. Company left armory at 1.00 p. m. The prob- 
lem consisted of an attack by Companies C, G and H against 
Rattlesnake Hill, defended by Company A. The attacking party 
wore O. D. uniform and the defenders wore blue. The attacking 
party was finally forced to retire. Officers and non-commissioned 
officers remained over night in camp for instruction preparatory 
to the coming maneuvers, on the Cape. The other men returned 
to their respective armories. 

CAlMP DUTY— MANEUVERS 

Aug. 14. to Aug. 21. The annual tour of camp duty was 
held as part of the maneuvers Vi'hich took place in Bristol and 
Plymouth Counties. The problem consisted of an attack on 

42 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Boston by an enemy force which landed in the vicinity of New 
Bedford. This force was known as the Red Army, under com- 
mand of Maj. Gen. Tasker Bliss, U. S. A., composed of National 
Guard Organizations from New York, New Jersey, Dist. of Col. 
and Conn. 1 hey were distinguished by a red band on their 
campaign hat. The entire Massachusetts Militia under com- 
mand of Brig. Gen. William A. Pew, Jr., M. V. M., known as the 
Blue Army, defended Boston. This force wore a band of blue 
cloth two and one-half inches wide around their campaign hats. 

Company A left Wakefield, Saturday, August 14, at 7.23 a. 
m., for Boston where train was taken at North Station for South 
Sudbury. Here the cars were transferred to the N. Y., N. H. and 
H. System and proceeded to Bridgewater, arriving at 12.30 p. m. 
Baggage v/as unloaded and rhe Regiment marched east about 
four miles to Paper Mill Village, where camp was pitched on the 
side of a hill, shelter tents being used. 

Sunday, .Aug. 15, the Second Battalion Cos. A, C, H and G, 
under Major Warren E. Sweetser, marched from camp at 2.15 a. 
m. and with Company A as advance guard moved six miles south- 
v-est to Titicut, and pitched camp opposite the State Farm at day- 
break. Here outposts were formed. 

Monday, Aug. 16, Company broke camp at 5.00 a. m., theo- 
retically blew up the railroad bridge over the Taunton River, 
and formed outpost two miles south on the Middleboro road, con- 
necting with the right flank of the 9th Regt. Patrols were thrown 
out. At 2 p. m., double shelter tents were pitched at the cross- 
roads at Namasket. A slight drizzle started in the afternoon 
which turned to rain making it very uncomfortable. 

Tuesday, Aug. 17. Camp was broken at 4.30 a. m. and th(f 
company moved to its position of Monday, during a rain storm 
the men wearing rubber ponchos. At the railroad embankment 
a line of skirmishers was formed, the left connecting with the 
right of the 9th Regt. During this time the rain was coming 
clown in torrents. Heavy firing was heard at intervals on our 
left. The rules of the maneuvers called for all movements to 
cease at 1.00 p. m. and for the troops to return to camp. Ac- 

43 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

cordingly the troops marched south toward Middleboro and by 
good fortune were quartered in a large barn. Roaring fires were 
built and the men tried to dry their clothing although it was still 
raining. 

Wednesday, Aug. 18. Reveille was at 3 a. m. At 5 a. m. 
the company formed rear guard of the battalion, marching north- 
east toward Bridgewater, where the regiment was assembled, and 
continued as such during the remainder of the maneuvers. Pass- 
ing through Bridgewater the regiment moved toward South Han- 
son Station and Bryantville. A forced march was in progress 
and halts were few. The weather had cleared. At 12.30 firing 
could be heard in front as the troops passed division headquar- 
ters. Orders came to move with all possible speed to reinforce the 
firing line and finally double time was taken up for about eight 
hundred yards. The company did splendidly, went into action 
behind a stone wall and continued a fire on the enemy until cease 
firing was sounded at 1.00 p. m. A distance of twenty miles had 
been covered with full field equipment. The regiment then 
moved back and made camp at Bryantville. 

Thursday, Aug. 19. At 4.00 a. m. the regiment took up a 
strong position on the crest of a hill near Bryantville, opposite 
a line of woods about 600 yards away, occupied by the enemy. At 
5 a. m. the whole First Brigade opened fire on the enemy causing 
them to retire toward Hanover Four Corners. At 8 a. m. the 
1st Brigade left Bryantville and proceeded rapidly in the direction 
o" Hanover Four Corners. On the way several flank attacks were 
made and after a march of about ten miles the Brigade reached 
the firing line at 12.15 noon and were deployed between the 8th 
and 9th Regts of Infantry. At 1 p. m. on completion of the man- 
euvers the enemy was occupying Hanover Four Corners while the 
Blue Army was attacking and covering all roads leading to the 
southwest and northwest thus ending the War Game of 1909. 
The regiment marched three miles and went into camp at South 
Hanover where they remained until Saturday, August 21st. At 
7.30 a. m. the regiment marched to North Hanover where after a 
long delay troops were entrained, leaving at 11.15 a. m. The 

44 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

troops arrived at the North Station at 5.15 p. m. The company 
arrived at the armory at 6.00 p. m. 

Conditions on these maneuvers were as near as possible those 
of actual war, the men carrying the complete field kit. Each 
company had one army wagon for baggage. A large number of 
working details were required but the men performed their duties 
with a very loyal spirit. 

ANNIVERSARY BANQUET 

Oct. 13. The fifty-eighth anniversary on Wednesday, Oct. 
13, consisted of the usual target shoot at the range in the after- 
noon and banquet at the armory in the evening. Caterer Dill 
prepared one of his best spreads. Music was furnished by Lynn 
Cadet Orchestra. The drill shed was beautifully decorated with 
flags and bunting, and with the full dress military uniforms made 
a brilliant scene. About 275 were present. Rev. J. F. Meheran 
invoked the Divine blessing. The following were the speakers: 
Representative J. S. Bonney, Capt. J. H. McMahon, C. F. Hart- 
shorne. Commander G. A. R.; J. F. Parker, Selectman; Col. E. J. 
Gihon, Commander in Chief, U. S. W. V.; Rev. W. S. Perkins, 
Capt. Lyman, U. S. M. C; Col. John Caswell and Dr. C. L. 
Sopher. Mr. William L. Coon of Post 12 G. A. R. ably presided 
as toastmaster. 

Oct. 25. The company received the gift of a Massachusetts 
Militia order of 1809 from Mr. A. A. Hawkes, father of Sgt. E. 
B. Hawkes. 

Nov. 22. A meeting of the company was called at 8 p. m. to 
elect a first lieutenant and any other vacancies, Lt. H. G. Brock- 
bank having resigned. Major Warren E. Sweetser presided. 
Lt. E. J. Connelly was unanimously elected First Lieutenant, and 
Sgt. Fred H. Rogers elected Second Lieutenant. 

Dec. 20. The company voted to run a series of dances 
commencing January 5, 1910. 



45 



CHAPTER FOUR 
1910 

Jan. 27. Owing to the continued presence of small pox in 
Wakefield the U. S. Inspection was postponed and all drills and 
meetings of the company suspended until Feb. 14. 

Feb. 14. Executive committee was given power to purchase 
the piano which the company had been renting from H. F. Miller 
Company. 

Feb. 28. In accordance with order the members assembled 
on Monday evening for Federal Inspection by Major Elmore F. 
Taggart, 24th U. S. Infantry. There were present 3 officers and 
47 men. 

March 7. After regular meeting the members were shown 
stereopticon slides of scenes during annual encampments by Sgt. 
Edgar B. Hawkes. 

PRIZE DRILL 

March 30. At the armory on Wednesday evening the An- 
nual Prize Drill and Presentation of Marksman's decorations oc- 
curred. There was a large attendance, delegations being present 
Post 12 G. A. R., Camp 39, U. S. W. V. and Ladies' Auxiliary of 
Camp 39. Prizes were awarded by Col. Edward J. Gihon, Com- 
mander in Chief of the Spanish War Veterans, who also presented 
the marksman's decorations won in 1909. 

April 25. On Monday evening the company assembled for 
the Annual State Inspection by Major James H. Smyth of the 
Gen. Staff. Present 3 officers and 53 enlisted men. 

May 8. Sgt. Edgar B. Flawkes was appointed first sergeant. 

May 30. Company in full dress uniforms acted as escort to 
Post 12, G. A. R. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

June 13. On Monday Company A proceeded to Marlboro 
and took part with the 6th Regt. in the parade incident to the 
celebration of the 125th anniversary of that city. 

June 14. The company assembled on Tuesday evening and 
went to Melrose by special electrics and attended the Flag Day 
Exercises held by the Melrose B. P. O. Elks in the city auditorium. 




Maj. Fred H. Rogers 

1st Lt. Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., N. G. 

Promoted Capt. 101st Ammunition Train. 

Promoted Major 101st Ammunition 

Train, World War 



ENCAMPMENT 

July 23 to July 30. The State Encampment was held at 

South Fram.ingham. Company left Wakefield on the 7.23 a. m. 

train for Boston where a special electric car was taken to South 

Framingham. Here the regiment was assembled and marched 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

to the camp grounds at 1 1 a. m. On Wednesday, July 27th, th:* 
first battalion acting as a red army marched about two miles 
northwest and camped on the Perry Farm, where patrols were sent 
out to locate the position of the remainder of the regiment known 
as the blue army. The problem was for the first battalion to 
defend the camp grounds until the supplies which were stored 
there could be removed. At 8.30 a. m., Thursday, July 28, the 
blue army opened fire on our outpost and a spirited engagement 
took place until "cease firing" was sounded at 10.30 a. m. The 
first battalion had successfully held their own and thus enabled 
the supplies to be removed. The regiment was then marched 
back to camp in time for dinner. 

On Friday, July 29, companies were instructed in the con- 
struction of trenches in the morning and in the afternoon the regi- 
ment was reviewed by Lt. Gov. Frothingham. 

The other days at camp were taken up with close and extend- 
ed order drills and evening parades. 

Saturday, July 30, the company arrived in Wakefield at 1.00 
p m., after a very instructive tour of duty. 

Sept. 10. On Saturday afternoon the 1st BN. went to Salem 
on special electric cars and pitched camp at Forest River Park 
or, the shore near Marblehead. A short battalion drill took place. 
Sunday morning was devoted to tactical walks which were very 
interesting. At 3 p. m., camp was broken and after an address 
by the regimental chaplain the battalion left for home. Com- 
pany A arrived in Wakefield at 5.30 p. m. 

ANNIVERSARY BANQUET 

Oct. 18. Fifty-ninth Anniversary of the Richardson Light 
Guard was celebrated on Tuesday. The target shoot was held 
at the Bay State Range in the afternoon. The banquet was 
served by Caterer Dill at the armory in the evening. Over 200 
atttended. All the military officers and enlisted men wore the 
full dress uniform and with the delicate evening gowns of the 
ladies made a brilliant setting. Rev. William T. O'Connor asked 
the blessing. A4r. Harris M. Dolbeare performed the duties of 
toastmaster in a very efficient manner. The following speakers 

48 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

responded to toasts: — Cong. Ernest W. Roberts, Col. Joshua D, 
Upton, J. Fred Parker, Selectman; W. D. Deadman, Post 12 G. A. 
R., Commander S. E. Ryder, U. S. W. V., and Capt. James H. 
■Griggs, a past member of the Richardson Light Guard. 

Dec. 12. The company voted to purchase a trophy not to 
exceed |25.00 in cost to commemorate the bowling championship 
of the town of Wakefield for 1909-1910, won by Company A. 




Co. A Officers, 1911, in Full Dress Uniform 

Left to right: 1st Lt. Edward J. Connelly, Capt. John H. 
McMahon, 2nd Lt. Fred H. Eogers 



1911 

Jan. 10. Major Elmore F. Taggart, 24th U. S. Inf., inspected 
the company at the armory on Tuesday evening. Present 3 
■ofTicers and 53 enlisted men. Total strength 3 officers and 60 
enlisted men. This was the annual Federal inspection. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
EXHIBITION DRILL 

Feb. 27. A special exhibition drill and presentation of 
marksman's decorations took place on Monday evening at the 
armory. The drill consisted of close and extended order move- 
ments followed by a guard mount. After the drill Capt. Stuart 
W. Wise, Ordinance Dept. M. V. M., presented the members with 
rifle and revolver decorations won in 1910. Refreshments were 
served following which a basket ball game between a team com- 
posed of members of the company and the Reading Indepen- 
dents was played. The company won by a score of 19 to 17. 

March 6. At the meeting it was announced that Mr. Henry 
A. Feindel, a good friend of the company, had offered two aggre- 
gate prizes in each class in the indoor shooting for the month of 
March. 

March 27. The State Inspection by Major Harry L. Brown 
Insp. Gen. Dept., v/as held on Monday evening. Present 3 of- 
ficers and 56 enlisted men, out of a total strength of 3 officers and 
59 enlisted men. 

April 10. Col. Edward J. Gihon gave a very interesting and 
ir.structive talk on the Panama Canal and the raising of the 
Battleship Maine. 

REGIMENTAL PARADE 

April 19. The members of Company A went to Lowell and 
took part in the Regimental drill and parade, the occasion being 
the Fiftieth Anniversary of the march of the 6th Mass. Regt. 
through Baltimore, Maryland, in 1861. After the parade a regi- 
mental drill was held on the South Common. Capt. John H. 
McMahon commanded the 1st Btn. in the absence of Maj. War- 
icn E. Sweetser who was ill. Present 3 ofTicers and 51 enlisted 
men. 

April 28. A large gathering of Fine Members and friends of 
the company witnessed the annual prize drill on Friday evening. 
Mr. George E. Walker, Chairman of Selectmen, awarded the 
prizes after wiiich dancing was enjoyed. Music was by the Lynn 
■Cadet Orchestra. 

50 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

May 30. At the exercises of Post 12 G. A. R. the company 
made a fine appearance. 

ARMORY BURNED 

July 6. About 7.00 p. m. a terrible electric storm broke over 
the town and a few minutes later lightning struck the Cutler Block 
setting it on fire, and despite the great amount of rain, the build- 
ing was soon a roaring mass of flames. It was evident that the 
aimory would be destroyed and m.embers of the company who 




Ruins of Old Armory and Cutler Building Fire, July 6, 1911 

Looking toward location of present State Armory 

had quickly assembled, together with local Spanish War Veterans, 
immediately hastened to save government property and valuable 
trophies belonging to the company. The property was taken 
across the street to Mr. Hughes' concrete garage and stored there. 
By the time the flames spread to the armory nearly everything o^^ 
value had been removed, except property stored in the attic. 

The Cutler Block was entirely destroyed and the entire upper 
story of the armory and most of the drill shed was burned. Help 
was summoned from Melrose, Stoneham and Reading. The fire 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

was not under control until 11.00 p. m. On July 7 the property- 
was collected and transferred to two rooms in the Taylor Building, 
where company quarters were established. Articles which were- 
not used frequently were stored in the basement of the Town Hall. 
July 9. A tactical walk for officers and non-commissioned 
officers was conducted by Major Warren E. Sweetser at Wilming- 
ton. 

FIELD SERVICE 

July 23 to July 30. The company assembled at the quarters 
u! the Taylor Building on Sunday to perform eight days' field 
service in connection with the maneuvers in Middlesex and Essex 
Counties. The company left Wakefield on the 9.02 a. m. train 
for Boston and proceeded to Bennett Hall Station, Billerica. The 
problem was the defense of Boston from an attack on the North 
by the Red Army. The blue army, of which the 6th Regt. was 
a part, camped at Billerica Sunday where the guard duty was 
performed by Company A. 

Monday, July 24th, at 6 a. m., the blue army marched over 
the Billerica-Pattenville road to the Lowell-Reading turnpike,. 
then northerly to Livingstone Street, to the State Almshouse, 
where camp was pitched on the hill southeast of the state build- 
ings, during a heavy rainstorm. The weather cleared in the 
afternoon. 

Tuesday, July 25. The 1st Battalion of the 6th Regt. re- 
lieved companies of the 2nd Inf., on outpost duty two miles north- 
east of the State Farm. Company A furnished an advance post 
on the railroad track to the northeast and sent a patrol to Andover 
and return. 

Wednesday, July 26. The 1st Battalion became right flank 
guard marching parallel to the main blue army through Ballard- 
vale, past the Andover Seminary, and over Pine Hill to Lawrence- 
Middleton turnpike. Company A formed the advanced party. 
At the turnpike firing was heard to the south and the company 
after a wait was later marched north on the turnpike to the camp' 
of the blue army at Frye Village, North Andover. 

52 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Thursday, July 27. At 8.00 a. m. the blue army marched 
through North Andover center to north of Great Pond and north- 
east of Hovey's and Chadwick's Ponds to camp ground north of 
Dead Hill, arriving at 1.00 p. m. The red army were in camp 
east of Hovey's Pond and indications pointed to a battle the fol- 
lowing day. 

Friday, July 28. The blue army moved in two columns, 
northeast toward Newburyport with the 1st Battalion 6th Inf. 
forming rear guard for the southern column. Fighting a rear 
guard action against the red 8th Inf., the column fell back slowly. 
A heavy rainstorm started about 9 a. m. The action continued 
despite the downpour until 1 p. m., when shelter was sought. Af- 
ter a most discouraging experience the company was quartered in 
a barn in West Newbury. Everyone was exhausted and chilled 
from the cold driving rain. 

For the first time auto trucks were used as an experiment 
instead of the usual mAile drawn escort wagons. The 1st Bat- 
talion truck train carrying the blanket rolls, men's blouses, and 
cooking outfits, became lost on Thursday, causing a most uncom.- 
fortable night in camp, the men having only their shelter halves to- 
protect them, from the elements. That, together with Friday's 
experience, made a situation as bad as conditions in actual war- 
fare. 

In the barn the men took off their clothing and burroughed 
in the hay to keep warm until the clothing partly dried. 

Saturday, July 29. Owing to the w^eather conditions maneu- 
vers were not resumed until 11.00 a. m. The 1st Bn. marched 
northeast to the Newburyport Fair Grounds and rejoined the rest 
of the regiment in cam.p. At this time the truck reported with 
the blankets and blouses which had been needed so much. At 
noon the troops marched to their positions on roads south and 
southeast of the city for the final defense of Newburyport. Spir- 
ited action continued during the afternoon until the maneuvers 
were officially terminated about 5.15 p. m. the battalion at this 
time holding a line along the railroad, between the red army and 
the city. All the troops returned to the Fair Grounds and re- 
mained there that evening. 

53 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Sunday, July 30. At 8.15 the regiment marched four miles 
southwest and entrained at 11.20 a. m., returning to Wakefield 
over the Nevvburyport Branch at 12.15 p. m. This tour was the 
most severe and trying ever undertaken by the National Guard 
of Massachusetts. 

ANNIVERSARY BANQUET 

Oct. 25. The Sixtieth Anniversary of the Richardson Light 
Guard was observed with a target shoot in the afternoon and ban- 
quet in the evening at the Grand Army Hall. This was an infor- 
mal affair, owing to the armory having been destroyed by fire. 
Capt. George M. Tompson presented the prizes. An entertain- 
m.ent was provided from talent among the company members. 
Capt. Tompson and Postmaster Dearborn spoke informally for 
the Fine Members. A new gold medal for marksmen class was 
presented to the company by Gen. Greenleaf A. Goodale, of Wake- 
field. This medal to remain the property of the company, and a 
bronze retainer to be awarded to the winner each year. 

Drills during this period were held in the Town Hall. 

1912 

Jan. 5. "Rendezvous" Drills were inaugurated this month. 
The conditions — 45 men must be present at each drill in order 
to qualify for pay allowed which was ninety cents per drill for 
privates, a supervising officer, not of the company, to be present 
an each drill. 

LAWRENCE STRIKE 

Jan. 29 to Feb. 14. Serious civil disturbances occurred in 
connection with a strike of the workers in various textile mills 
in Lawrence which made it necessary to call upon the Militia to 
preserve law and order in this city. The first troops called on 
January 8th were placed under command of Col. E. Leroy Sweet- 
ser, 8th Inf. M. V. M. Fresh disturbances on January 29th, 
caused an order for twelve more companies to report. Capt. 
McMahon at 3.10 p. m. received a telephone order from the 

54 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Adjutant General's office to assemble Company A and await or- 
ders. Squad leaders notified their men using their alarm list 
and the men assembled at the Taylor Building. The men donned 
the service uniform and overcoats. Shelter tent, blanket and 
poncho were in collar roll. 

The company was marched to the Town Hall and the men 
instructed as to their duties and the seriousness of the situation. 




Co. A Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers at Lawrence, 
January, 1912 

Kneeling, left to right: 1st Sgt. Hawkes, Sgt. Stark, Cpl. Sweeu- 

ser, Sgt. rarnhani, Cpl. Murray, Sgt. Findlay, Cpl. Evans. 

Standing, left to right: Sgt. Baxter, Cpl. Creedon, 1st Lt. 

Connelly, 2nd Lt. Eogers, Capt. McMahon, Cpl. Hickey, 

Cpl. Qualters 



'1 weruy rounds of guard ammunition were issued to each man and 
the rifles loaded and locked. Three officers and forty-eight men 
entrained at 8.31 p. m. at the upper station. Lawrence was 
reached at 9.20 p. m. The battalion under Major W. E. Sweetser 
formed at the station and marched through the snow to Essex 
Street to the armory on Amesbur}' Street. Heavy snow was 
falling during this m.arch. 

55 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Companies A and H were assigned quarters in the armory 
^s a reserve battalion. 

There were now twenty-two companies of infantry and two 
troops of cavalry under command of Col. E. LeRoy Sweetser in 
the city. 

Companies A and H alternated on guard duty around the 
armory and the streets in the immediate vicinity. Bayonets were 
always fixed and greatest vigilance exacted. 

The weather conditions were severe, the temperature being 
below zero a number of days. When not on guard duty troops 
■drilled and attended school. One platoon was held always in 
readiness and in the event of any trouble rushed on auto trucks 
to points in the city. On January 30 the strength was 3 officers 
and 58 enlisted m.en which was our total enrollment throughout 
the tour of fifteen days' duty. Stocking caps, mittens and over- 
shoes were issued by the State, and cots furnished in the drill shed. 
Cooking was done on large gas ranges in the armory, the men 
using their mess kits at m.eals. 

On January 31 Lt. Rogers with sixteen men were sent on 
special guard at the jail where the strike leader Ettor was detained. 
On Feb. 1 the company patrolled the common and adjoining 
streets. Friday, Feb. 2 at 8.45 p. m. Lt. Connelly and ten men 
were rushed by truck to Lowell and Valley Streets where four mur- 
ders had been committed and crowds had congregated. The men 
were recalled at 10.00 p. m. and the entire company held under 
arms until I LOO p. m. 

Sunday, Feb. 4, church services were held in the armory by 
Rev. Father Regan and by Chaplain of the 6th Inf. 

Monday, Feb. 5. Company A furnished a guard at the Pub- 
lic Library and at the Electric Light Station during change of 
troops. The city was becoming quieter but guard duty was not 
relaxed. The regular Federal Inspection of Company A was 
held on Saturday, Feb. 10th, by 1st Lt. Butcher, U. S. Army. 
Due to the drills of the past week the company made an excellent 
showing. Church services were held on Sunday, Feb. 11th. On 
Monday, Feb. 12, the men received pay for fifteen days' service. 

56 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Companies A and H left at 3.00 p. m. by special electric cars for 
their home stations. This was the longest tour of duty the 
company had ever performed and was the first time the Richard- 
son Light Guard had been called to perform duty of this nature- 
Great credit is due for the intelligent and efficient manner in 
which Company A conducted itself. 

April 25. The regular State Inspection this year was held 
in the Town Hall. Inspecting officer, Lt. Col. John S. Barrows, 
M. V. M. There were 3 officers and 48 enlisted men present. 

May 24. The annual prize drill also took place in the town 
hall this year. After the drill dancing was enjoyed by the large 
gathering present until 12 o'clock. 

May 6. In accordance with the laws and regulations govern- 
ing the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia the Captains hereafter be- 
come treasurers of their respective company funds, and are held 
responsible for same. 

June 29. On this date the company left Wakefield at 4.30 
p. m. on electric car for an outing at Billerica on Concord River, 
arriving there about 7.00 p. m. Shelter tent camp was pitched. 
The next day was spent in general recreation, playing ball, swim- 
ming and athletic sports. The company left for home on June 
30th about 4.30 p. m., arriving at Wakefield 6.30 p. m. 

July 27. On Saturday, this date, the company assembled at 
1.00 p. m. at the Taylor Building to take cars for a battalion drill 
at Tewksbury. Uniform worn — Olive Drab with campaign hat, 
shelter tent, canteen and haversack were carried. The company 
left for home at 5.30 p. m. on special electrics. 

CAMP DUTY 

Aug. 1 1-Aug. 18. Three officers and fifty-one men left at 6.45 
a m. for the annual tour of duty which this year was held as part 
of the maneuvers in Connecticut. The train left South Station 
at 9.00 a. m. and arrived at Derby, Conn., at 5.15 p. m. Details 
at once commenced unloading baggage from cars, while a large 
gathering of spectators looked on. The unloading was quickl}^ 
done and the regiment marched to Orange, five miles southeast 

57 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ol Derby, arriving at 7.45 p. m. and pitciiing camp immediately. 
Major Warren E. Sweetser being ill, Capt. McMahon commanded 
the 1st Battalion. Lt. Edward J. Connelly commanded the com- 
pany during the maneuvers. The problem consisted of an at- 
tack by a blue army which had landed on the shores of Connecti- 
cut with the intention of cutting off the water supply of New York 
City on the north. 

Monday, Aug. 12. The 6th Regt. of the Red Army worM^v 
out a problem of their own which consisted of an attack by the 1st 
and 2nd battalions on a wagon train defended by the third bat 
talion. The weather was very hot. In an adjacent field a regi- 
ment of New York troops were camped, most of whom seemed to 
be men of middle age in contrast to the much younger appearance 
of our own men. 

Tuesday, Aug. 13. The regiment broke camp at 7.30 a. m. 
and marched through Derby on the Derby-Bridgeport road, to 
Shelton to Huntington a distance of eleven miles. Company A 
acted as advance guard to the column and at 2.00 p. m. the point 
met a small detachment of the enemy who fired about fifty shots 
and then fell back. Our brigade commander assumed we were 
close to the enemy and went into camp at Huntington. The first 
battalion which had furnished the advance guard now formed out- 
posts for the night. Company A covered their front with three 
cossack posts. 

Wednesday, Aug. 14. Camip was broken at 6.00 a. m.. Com- 
pany A remaining on outpost on main road until 1 1.00 a. m. when 
the battalion was rejoined. After Company D, which was five 
miles away, had joined the column march was continued for 
about nine miles most of which was uphill and as it was a very hot 
aay this made marching very fatiguing. Lower White Hills was 
reached at 5 p. m. Owing to the high elevation the wagon train 
had a very difficult time in making the steep grade and it became 
necessary for them to add an extra team of horses to each wagon 
in order to reach the top. From the camp the country could be 
viewed for many miles showing beautiful scenery. The water 
necessary for drinking and cooking had to be carried consider- 
able distance to camp. 

58 



History C)h Richardson Light Guard 

Thursday, Aug. 15. On account of the previous hard day's 
march the regiment remained in camp to allow the men to rest. 
At 5.15 p. m. the company formed for inspection by a regular 
army officer. So far the weather had been hot but pleasant. 

Friday, Aug. 16. At 6 a. m. the regiment started on the 
longest march of the maneuvers about fourteen miles and went 
into camp at a small town on the railroad by the name of Sandy 
Hook. As this march was mostly down hill the conditions were 
not so trying as on the previous march. Camp was pitched at 
1.30 p. m. and haversack lunch consumed, consisting of canned 
salmon and hard bread. A most interesting sight was the work 
of the artillery, there being about fifty guns and cassions. In the 
evening there were several band concerts. Here the red army 
mobilized for one final attack on the blue army the following day. 
The red army was about five miles away from the enemy's left 
flank. 

Saturday, Aug. 17. At 7.00 a. m. the red army moved to 
attack the enemy. In a short time the firing of artillery was 
heard and soon after the battalion formed for attack. After 
climbing two stone walls and two wooden fences, line of skirmish- 
ers was formed and firing commenced against the center of the 
blue army's line. Company A held their formations splendidly 
throughout the entire battle. After half an hour of steady firing 
the recall sounded and the battle of 1912 was over. The regiment 
then marched to Hawleyville where camp was pitched. Camp 
pay was received that evening putting men in the best of spirits. 
The company cooks on this tour performed their work wonderful- 
ly well. 

Sunday, Aug. 18. This day it rained hard. Camp was 
broken at 7.00 a. m. and the station at Hawleyville reached at 
7.45 a. m. Details loaded the wagons on flat cars and after the 
baggage was put on the train, start was made at 10.20 for Boston. 
South Station was reached at 6.30 p. m. and company marched to 
North Station for Wakefield train, arriving at armory about 8.00 
p. m. 

For the first time airships were used in Maneuvers and made 
a. most interesting spectacle. 

59 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Oct. 9. The annual fall field day this year consisted of a tar- 
:get shoot only, the banquet being omitted owing to the coming 
dedication exercises. The prizes were awarded at the next reg- 
ular meeting of the company. 




Front of New 
State Armory, 191 J 



IN NEW ARMORY 

Dec. 16. The first drill in the new armory was held on this 
evening, although the property was moved from Curley's Block 
which had been occupied from the first of August the company 
having been obliged to move from Taylor Building due to lease 
ot quarters. The upper floor of the Curley Block was used for 
the storage of property only, drills being suspended. 



60 



CHAPTER FIVE 

19 }y 

DEDICATION OF STATE ARMORY 

Jan. 15. The most brilliant event in the history of the Rich- 
ardson Light Guard was the dedication in the presence of over 
five hundred people of Company A's imposing new home. The 
State Armory built of brick, facing Main Street at the corner of 
Armory Street, and adjoining the old Cyrus Wakefield estate is 
unique in t\pe, the front being of colonial design, the only one in 
the State. In front of the building there was a driveway leading 
to the Wakefield Estate and several large elm trees. Later when 
the New High School was built the trees were removed and the 
driveway was lowered to the new street level to conform with the 
grading of the new school. The stone wall in front of the armory 
was also removed and in its place a privet hedge was substituted. 

The chief guest of honor was His Excellency, Eugene N. Foss, 
Gov. of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, accompanied by 
Adjutant General Gardner W. Pearson. Over one hundred of- 
ficers prominent in military life were present. 

A short reception to Gov. Foss was held in the Company 
Recreation Room which was tastefully decorated with palms, ferns 
and bunting. In the receiving line were Captain John H. Mc- 
Mahon, Miss Nellie McMahon, Lt. and Mrs. Edward J. Connelly, 
Lt. and Mrs. Fred H. Rogers, Col. J. Pa3/son Bradley, Past Dept. 
Commander Mass. G. A. R., and Solon O. Richardson, Wakefield. 
The reception lasted about thirty minutes after which the guests 
sat down to a fine banquet. Jesse A. Dill of Melrose was caterer. 
Rev. John F. Meheran of St. Joseph's Church asked the Divine 
blessing. After the banquet, Capt. John H. McMahon intro-- 
duced Col. Edward J. Gihon, a past commander of Company A, 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

who officiated as toastmaster in an admirable manner. Col.. 
Gihon, who commanded the company in the Spanish American 
War, spoke of the history of the company and of its wonderful 
record in rifle shooting. After the Lynn Cadet Band played the 
Star Spangled Banner the toastmaster presented Gov. Foss, who 
praised the Massachusetts Militia as being the most efficient in the 
country and complimenting the military officers for their co-oper- 
ation. Adj. Gen. Pearson followed and spoke in glowing terms oi' 
Company A's record of efficiency. 



Hall Clock presented to Co. A 
by George F. Lucas, 1913 



George E. Walker, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen re- 
sponded to the toast, "Town of Wakefield" and referred in his 
remarks to the wonderful military record of the town and the 
standard set by the present members of the Richardson Light 
Guard. Col. J. Payson Bradley, the next speaker, waxed elo- 
quent in the vivid description of the work done by the G. A. R. in 
the Civil War. 

Solon O. Richardson, Jr., came from Toledo, Ohio, to speak 
for the Richardson family regarding their great interest in the- 
town's military company. His closing pledge to keep up his in- 

63 



History Uf Richardson Light Guard 

terest in the organization though far distant, was received with ap- 
preciative applause. Rev. William F. Dusseault, Chaplain in 
Chief of the U. S. W. V., delivered a stirring address. William 
P. Shepard made the closing address speaking in behalf of the 
R. L. G. Fine Members Association in place of Hon. S. K. Hamil- 
ton who had been injured a few days previous. 

Seated at the principal head table on the platform were the 
following: Gov. Foss, Gen. and Mrs. Pearson, Col. E. J. Gihon 
and niece. Miss Mullaley of Stoneham, Gen. Pierce of Greenfield, 
Gen. and Mrs. Greenleaf A. Goodale, Chairman Walker of the 
Selectmen and Mrs. Walker, Col. Bradley, Chaplain Dusseault, 
Gen. William B. Emery of the Armory Commission, Gen. P. Frank 
Packard, M. V. M., and Mrs. Packard, Capt. John H. McMahon 
and Miss Nellie McMahon, Lt. and Mrs. Edward J. Connelly, Lt. 
and Mrs. Fred H. Rogers, Capt. George M. Tompson, Col. Ed- 
ward J. Logan of 9th Regt. and lady. Rev. John F. Meheran, Col. 
and Mrs. E. LeRoy Sweetser, Col. and Mrs. Frank F. Cutting. 
Solon O. Richardson and Mr. and Mrs. Solon O. Richardson, Jr., 
of Toledo, Ohio. Col. George H. Priest of the 6th Regt. was un- 
able to attend on account of illness. Especially interesting was 
the presence of George Cox, Henry L. Eaton, William S. Arring- 
ton, three of the four living charter members of the R. L. G. 

Jan. 20, 1913. A committee was appointed to make ar- 
rangements for a trip of Company members to Washington in 
March to attend the Inauguration. 

Feb. 15. The Washington Club of the Company held a sa- 
cred concert at the Princess Theatre, the proceeds being added to 
the expense fund of the Washington Trip. 

Feb. 17. The armory was opened to public inspection. The 
company in command of Capt. John H. McMahon gave a special 
drill after which about one thousand spectators were escorted 
through the armory by officers and company members. 

March 1. Eighteen members of Company A under the com- 
mand of Capt. John H. McMahon left for Washington to take 
part in the inaugural exercises of President Wilson. The trip 
was by the way of Fall River Line to New York and Penn. Rail- 
road to Washington. The members were quartered at Mrs. 
Johnson's residence, 320 Indiana Ave., N. W. On Tuesday thev 
took part in the inaugural parade, the Massachusetts representa- 
tives being the sixth State in column. The company remained 
until Thursday morning sight seeing when they left for home 
returning by the same route, arriving Friday morning about 10.30. 

March 10. Company A assembled at the Armory on this 
evening for the annual State Inspection. Lt. Col. Frank A 

64 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Graves, 8th Inf., M. V. M. Asst. Inspector General, was the in- 
specting officer. There were three officers and 48 enlisted men 
present. 

March 17. It was voted the clerk's salary be raised from 
$25.00 to 150.00 per year. 

March 21. On this evening the annual federal inspection was 
held by Lt. J. R. McGinness, U. S. A. Present three officers and 
53 enlisted men. 

May 12. The Richardson Light Guard held their annual 
prize drill on this date. Prizes were awarded by Lt. Col. Robin- 
son. After the drill dancing was enjoyed until 12 o'clock. 

May 19. A surprise state inspection of the Company was 
made by Col. John Barrows, Inspector, no notice having been 
given. 

May 25. The members of this command acted as escort to 
Camp 39, U. S. W. V., at their memorial exercises in Forest Glade 
Cemetery, in connection with the dedication of their monument, 
Chapman's Band of Reading furnishing the music. 

May 30. The Company in full dress uniform performed the 
usual escort duty to Post 12, G. A. R., in their Memorial Day 
exercises. 

June 14. Flag Day exercises were held by the Wakefield 
Lodge of Elks on this evening in the Town Hall, preceded by a 
short parade in which the Company took part, under Lt. E. J. 
Connelly. Capt. John J. McMahon was chief marshal of the 
parade. 

June 23. Lt. M. D. Bryant, Regimental Surgeon, gave anti- 
typhoid innoculation to thirty-eight members, and on July 5 gave 
the second innoculation. 

July 19. Thirty members of Company A journeyed to Bil- 
lerica on Cotter's Express truck for a one night's camp. The ob- 
ject of this short camp was the instruction of new men in pitching 
sheltered tents and camp routine. The camp was made on the 
banks of the Concord River. 

July 27. Three officers and 56 enlisted men of Company A 
left for annual tour of camp duty at Mattapoisett, Mass. A. 
special electric car was taken in front of the armory for South 
Station where train was taken at 9.15 a. m., arriving at Mattapoi- 
sett at 11.45. Regimental camp was pitched about 100 yards 
from the shore of Mattapoisett Harbor where excellent bathing 
was enjoyed by the men during their stay here. The regiment re- 
mained here five days engaged in close and extended order drills 
during the morning. The afternoon work consisted of officers, 
and non-coms, schools, guard mount and evening parade. On 

65 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Friday morning the regiment broke camp at 8.00 a. m. and was 
transported from iMattapoisett to Myricks, via trolley to New 
Bedford and train to Myricks. From here the regiment marched 
to Lakeville, south of Middleboro, where camp was pitched. Sat- 
urday at 6.00 a. m. the regiment marched toward Middleboro with 
Company A acting as advance guard to meet the enemy, consist- 
ing of the 5th, 8th and 9th regiments called the Blue Army. The 
Red Army consisted of the 2nd and 6th regiments and troops of 
calvary from Connecticut. As Company A entered the town of 
Middleboro, they were fired on by the enemy and a spirited bat- 
tle took place for about two hours in the vicinity of the railroad. 
The regiment then marched four miles to South Middleboro and 
made cam.p about 2.00 p. m. On Sunday morning, August 3rd, 
the regiment broke camp at 7.00 a. m. entrained for home, the 
Company arriving in Wakefield about 2.30 p. m. 

Oct. 9. The 62nd anniversary was celebrated on this date, 
with a target shoot at the Bay State Range at 2 p. m. and a ban- 
quet at the armory at 8 p. m. About three hundred were present 
including the ladies at the banquet, caterer Jesse A. Dill. Rev. 
John F. Meheran asked the divine blessing. After a brief wel- 
come by Capt. John H. McMahon, town treasurer George E. 
Walker was introduced as toastmaster. The speakers of the 
evening were Chairman Frank A. Long, Board of Selectmen, Rep. 
Charles A. Dean, Com. Dennis W. McCarthy, Post 12, G. A. R., 
Com. Thomas M. Croke, U. S. W. V., Adj. George H. S. Driver, 
Post 12, G. A. R., and Rev. James J. Cogan of the Episcopal 
Church. 

Nov. 27. A Thanksgiving Day hop at the armory proved a 
big success. The floor in the drill hall had been put in excellent 
condition by a sanding machine and thoroughly waxed. About 
150 couples were present in the afternoon, and 250 couples in the 
evening. Music was by Trentwell's Full Orchestra from Som- 
erville. Dancing v/as from 3 p. m. to 6 p .m. and from 7 p. m. 
to 11 p. m. 

Dec. 1. Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough was commissioned 
Captain in the Ordnance Dept. and assigned as Inspector of small 
arms practice of the 6th regiment Infantry. A story of Capt. 
Keough's activities in rifle work will be found in another chapter 
and will prove of much interest. 

1914 

Jan. 30. 1st Lt. John R. McGinness, U. S. Inf., conducted 
the federal inspection of the company at 8.15 p. m. Much at- 

66 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

tention was given to squad work. Present three officers and 49 
enlisted men. Field service uniform, O. D. shirts, and tan shoes 
were worn. 

Under instructions from the Adj. General's office, companies 
were allowed to hold ten "rendezvous drills". The conditions 
called for an attendance of 40 men at each drill. Pay of $.90 for 
each drill was allowed. As a new venture these drills were not 
successful but later proved to be. 

March 23. Lt. Col. James A. Cully, inspecting officer, con- 
ducted the annual state inspection of the Company at 8.00 p. m., 
present three officers, 44 men. Service uniform was worn. 

April 20. A patriotic assembly held at the armory was a 
social success, about 150 couples being present. Dancing was 
from 8.00 until 1 a. m., music by Treadwell's Orchestra of ten 
pieces. Company A was assisted by Post 12 G. A. R., Camp 39, 
U. S. W. v.. Sons of Veterans, Wakefield High School Cadets, and 
affiliated ladies' auxiliaries. 

May 24. As in the past two years. Company A performed 
escort duty to Camp 39, U. S. \V. V., at their memorial exercises 
in Forest Glade Cemetery. Assembly was at 2.30 p. m. at ar- 
rnory. The column marched up Main Street to Salem Street, 
Vernon and Lowell Streets to cemetery. On return to the armory 
a splendid collation was served. 

May 25. The annual prize drill took place at 8.30 p. m. 
After the drill, dancing was enjoyed until 11.30. Music was by 
the American Orchestra of Wakefield. 

May 30. The Company made a splendid showing with six 
full squads under Capt. John H. McMahon at the Memorial Day 
services of Post 12, G. A. R. As in previous years, the column 
m.arched up Main Street to the Soldiers' Monument on the Com- 
mon where the exercises took place and then to the old and new 
cemeteries where the graves were decorated. On return to G. A. 
R. hall, the customary collation was served. 

June 8. Lt. M. D. Bryant gave the first anti-typhoid innocu- 
1 at ion to the new men. 

June 13. In accordance with orders. Company A left Wake- 
field at 10.30 a. m. for Concord, Mass., to take part with the 
regiment in the burial services of the late commander of the 6th 
regiment. Col. Cyrus H. Cook. Capt. John H. McMahon was 

67 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

battalion commander and 1st Lt. E. J. Connelly commanded 
Compan}^ A. The regiment escorted the remains from the res- 
idence through the center of the town to the church where services 
"were held. The escort then proceeded to Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, 
■Concord, Mass., where the body was interred. The 2nd battalion 
fired the usual three volleys after which taps was blown. The 
'Company arrived back at Wakefield at 7.40 p. m. 

June 15. On account of vacancy of Major in the 1st bat- 
talion, Capt. John H. McMahon was detailed as acting major un- 
til election was held, and Lt. Edward J. Connelly placed in com- 
mand of Company A. 

June 15. Company A donated the sum of |10.00 toward a 
fund for a memorial tablet to the late Colonel Cyrus H. Cook. 

July 5. The Company left Wakefield at 7.30 a. m., Sunday, 
by trolley to South Station to take train to Middleboro for the 
annual tour of camp duty, July 5 to July 12, inclusive. The 
-camp was situated midway between Middleboro and Lakeville 
known as the Joe Hooker camp grounds used for mustering pur- 
poses in 1861. Camp was reached at 1.00 p. m. and the new- 
large army tents were immediately pitched. Lt. E. J. Connelly 
had command of Company A during the tour and Capt. John H. 
McMahon commanded the 1st battalion. The military instruc- 
tions at this camp were under the direction of regular army offi- 
cers and the camp was under the command of Col. Morton of the 
Tcgular army. The program included schools for officers and 
^Non-Coms in the morning, drills in close and extended order in the 
afternoon. Advance guard instruction was also taken up and 
sham battles helped to vary the wsual routine. On Friday a 
review was given to Governor David I. Walsh. The governor 
inspected the cook houses and paid a compliment to company A 
for having the best on the field. The other companies were in- 
structed to visit Company A's cook house and adopt the arrange- 
ments as a model. Saturday a new feature took place. The four 
companies in each battalion were combined into the company 
representing a war-strength unit. Lts. Edward J. Connelly and 
Fred FI. Rogers of Company A had the experience of drilling this 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

large company. After the regular evening parade, the company 
if: heavy marching order was inspected by regular army officers. 
During this tour Company A had the record of no one reporting 
tor illness. Sunday morning the Company broke camp at 6.00 
and trolley taken to Middleboro, where they entrained for Boston, 
arriving there at 8.45 a. m. and returning to Wakefield at 10.30 
by special electric car. 




Co. A on Maneuvers 

At Lakeville, near Middleboro, 1914, with 1st Battalion, 6tli 
Mass. Inf., Co. A, leading, in command of 1st Lt. Connelly 
Maj. McMahon on left in foreground with Bn. Adjt. Downes 



MAJOR McMAHON 

August 15. Capt. McMahon, who had been in command of 
the first battalion for some time, was elected Major unanimously 
by the officers of the Sixth Regiment. 

This officer who commanded Co. A for twelve years was one 
■of the best liked leaders the company ever had. Under his direc- 
tion the company maintained a consistent high standard in its 
■work. The Captain, himself an expert shot, gave much atten- 
.tion to keeping the company at the head of the regiment in rifle 

69 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

shooting and was a member of Co. A's team. He has won numer- 
ous medals. 

Major McMahon had seen continuous service with the com- 
pany since June 5, 1893 and served with it during the Spanish- 
American War taking part in the action at Quanica, Porto Rico. 
He became Second Lieutenant June 12, 1899, and Captain, Feb. 
24, 1902. 

The Major has served as military instructor in the High 
Schools of Wakefield, Stoneham and Woburn. He is a distin- 
guished marksman and an expert rifle and revolver marksman. 

September 21. 1st Lt. Edward J. Connelly was elected Cap- 
tain at a meeting presided over by Major John H. McMahon, 
assisted by Lt. Geo. M. Downes. 2nd Lt. Fred H. Rogers was- 
elected 1st Lt. and 1st Sgt. Edgar B. Hawkes elected 2nd Lt. At 
this meeting the company voted to purchase special Richardson 
Light Guard bronze medals for the company rifle team and a bar 
for each of the past four years. 

Oct. 7. The 63rd annual field day was celebrated with the. 
usual success. The target shoot took place at the Rifle Range in 
the afternoon. At the banquet in the evening 325 were pres- 
ent, including ladies. The hall was tastefully decorated. Rev. 
Francis D. Taylor of the Methodist Church asked the blessing. 
Capt. Edward J. Connelly welcomed the guests and introduced as 
toastmaster Town Treasurer George E. Walker, who presided in a 
charming manner. 7'he speakers of the evening were: Gen. E, 
Leroy Sweetser of Everett, Commander of the 2nd Brigade, Col.. 
Warren E. Sweetser, 6th Regiment, Capt. Frederic B. Bauer, 8th 
Regiment, Forest A. Seavey, Chairman of Selectmen, Rev. Flo- 
rence J. Halloran of St. Joseph's Church, and Col. Edward J. 
Gihon. The American Orchestra furnished the music and Jesse 
A.. Dill of Melrose was caterer. 

Nov. 23. After an exhibition drill by the Company, a. 
motion picture program of camp scenes, Salem fire, and work of 
the Mass. State militia was arranged for the entertainment of 25(.^' 
friends of the Company. Lt. Col. Fred R. Robinson gave a talk 
describing the difi'erent scenes and reviewed the work of the mili- 
tia for the past twenty-five years. The moving picture machine.- 

70 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

and the steel booth were owned by the State and were used to stim- 
ulate interest and recruiting in the volunteer militia. 

Dec. 7. Mr. William J. Pellisier of Greenwood, a former 
member of Company L of the 5th regiment of Maiden, gave a very 
interesting entertainment to the Company consisting of sleight-of- 
hand tricks and magic which was very much enjoyed. 

Dec. 21. Lt. Col. Damon accompanied by Major John H. 
McMahon inspected the company on this evening. There were 
three officers and 55 enlisted men present. 



71 



CHAPTER SIX 
1915 

At the beginning of this year, Capt. Connelly planned an ex- 
tensive program which continued until the war in 1917. Regular 
diills, schools for non-coms, rendezvous drills, indoor shooting, 
basket ball, athletic events, rifle qualification, and social affairs 
kept officers and men extremely busy but produced wonderful re- 
sults bringing the company to its highest standard and leading 
the regiment in all around efficiency. 

Jan. 7. A test was made on this date to determine the readi- 
ness of the company to respond to a hurry call. Major Mc- 
Mahon of the First Battalion issued an order for the captain to- 
assemble his company. This was received about 4 p. m. and the 
members were notified at their various places of employment by 
telephone. At 8 p. m. the company assembled for inspection with. 
46 men and 3 officers, several men reporting later — a very satis- 
factory showing. 

Jan. 11. The new Richardson Light Guard medals were pre- 
sented to the members of the rifle teams of 1911, 12, 13, 14 after 
the regular drill. It was considered a big honor to be eligible for 
these medals as a man had to show considerable skill in order to 
make the teams which in Company A were far above the average. 
Lieut.-Col. Fred R. Robinson after congratulatory remarks pre- 
sented the medals. Major McMahon, Capt. Keough, and Corp. 
Sweetser told of early experiences in rifle shooting of Comoany A. 

Jan. 22. Friday evening this date the company assembled 
for Federal and State inspection by First Lieutenant Benjamin E. 
Grey, U. S. Infantry. The olive drab service uniforms with cam- 
paign hat and russet shoes were worn. Complete field equipment 
was carried by the men (shelter tent roll, canteen, haversack, en- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

trenching tools, flag signal kits.) The company passed an unuau- 
all}^ fine inspection. 

Feb. 1. Rendezvous drills for this season started on this 
date. In order to qualify for pay it was necessary to have an at- 
tendance of 40 enlisted men present, each drill to last one and one- 
half hours actual time. The total strength allowed each company 
to this date had been three officers and sixty men. At the first 
drill three officers and fifty men were present showing the interest 
and co-operation of the company. 

Later this month new regulations increased the peace strength 
of a company to three officers and sixty-five enlisted men and re- 
quired an attendance of 43 enlisted men at each rendezvous drill. 
One more of these drills were held this month. 

Feb. 24. On the evenings of Feb. 24, 25, 26 the Quannapow- 
itt Poultry Association conducted their first poultry and pigeon 
show under the auspices of Com.pany A. The show held in the 
drill hall was largely attended, many people from other towns be- 
ing present. This proved to be a very interesting event. Mr. 
Arthur L. Evans of Wakefield had a wonderful exhibition of 
pigeons and won numerous prizes. 

March. Company A won the tournament with Company H 
of Stoneham, the account appears in chapter on athletics. Three 
rendezvous drills were held this month. 

March 23. Russet shoes were ordered to be worn with uni- 
form on all occasions by enlisted men. 

April. Two well attended rendezvous drills were held this 
month. 

May 3. The annual prize drill was largely attended by Fine 
Members and friends of the Company. Forty-six men competed. 
As in previous years several merchandise prizes were awarded in 
addition to the three drill medals. Lieut. -Col. Fred R. Robinson 
before awarding the prizes gave a short talk regarding the im- 
portance of military training and the necessity of a militia. 

May 24. On this evening Lieut. -Col. John S. Barrows in- 
spected the company (U. S. Inspection). Col. W. E. Sweetser, 
Sixth Regiment, Major John H. McMahon, first Bn.; Capt. 

73 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Charles M. Rotch and Capt. John F. Osborne of the First Corps 
Cadets were present as observers. Both Col. Sweetser and Col. 
Barrows complimented Capt. Connelly on the excellent inspection 
passed. Present three officers, fifty-four men. 

The company finished fifth in the bowling league, but won: 
high team total (prize |5) and $12, also prize money. Corp. J. 
E. Creedon won high individual prize (cup) and Private D. C. 
Creedon won high average prize of company a cup. Members 
of team — Corp. J. E. Creedon, captain; Corp. M. J. Burns, Pri- 
vates D. C. Creedon, Paul W. Mortimer, and Thomas W. Walsh. 

May 30. Three officers and forty-five men escorted Camp 39- 
L, S. W. Y. to Forest Glade Cemetery for Memorial exercises on 
Sunday at 2 p. m. 

May 31. In accordance with usual custom Company A acted 
as escort to Post 12, G. A. R. on this Memorial Day. 

The eighth and ninth rendezvous drills were held during this 
month. 

June 7. A most pleasant surprise was given Major John H. 
McMahon v/hen Capt. Connelly on behalf of the company pre- 
sented him with the sabre he had worn as company commander 
for twelve years. The Major who had been retired with rank of 
Lieut.-Col. responded feelingly, the men giving sincere cheers. 

DUTY AT LOWELL 

July 3, 4, 5. The Company left Wakefield Saturday, July 
3, at 4 p. m., by electrics for a special three-days' tour of 
duty at Tewkesbury and Lowell with the Sixth Regiment. Ar- 
riving at camp site opposite the Tewkesbury State Farm, tents 
were pitched at 6 p. m. The cooks had preceded the company 
and prepared a hot meal. Sunday morning a battalion drill was 
held. Company A furnished guard with Capt. Connelly as officer 
of the day and Lieut. Hawkes, officer of guard. At 8 a. m., 
July 5, the regiment took train to Lowell and marched to the Com- 
mon where a fine box lunch was furnished after which a regimental 
parade was given on the Common. 

The regiment, with the Eighth Regiment and numerous civic 

74 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

•organizations, paraded through the city during a heavy rainstorm 
which drenched everyone. 

Aug. 2. This evening the tenth and last rendezvous drill of 
the season took place. The average attendance for these drills was 
three officers and fifty-one enlisted men — a very fine showing as 
the required number to qualify was forty-three. This meant that 
a sum of ^500 would be distributed to the men from Federal 
Funds. 



ANNUAL CAMP 

August. A regimental camp this year formed the program 
of annual state duty, August 8 to August 15, at Peter's Pond. 
Sandwich, Mass. The company entrained at South Station, Sun- 
day at 8.30, having journeyed from Wakefield by trolley. The 
battalion under command of Capt. Duncan M. Stewart of Stone- 
ham marched five miles over a good road to the camp site. Com- 
pany A reported fifty-.seven men out of a total enrollment of fifty- 
nine, and three officers. 

The routine of the work consisted of close and extended or- 
der in the morning and schools for the officers and non-coms in 
the afternoon v/hile the enlisted men were allowed liberty. Capt. 
McCoy, U. S. A., had supervision of the instruction work. 

The camp was beautifully situated near a large pond where 
good bathing was enjoyed. 

Aug. 8-15. As the camp was far from any villages. Col. 
Sweetser had a moving picture machine installed at the foot of a 
steep hill. Here good shows were given each evening, the men 
grouped on slopes of the hill. Boxing, wrestling, and other enter- 
tainment was furnished from talent in the regiment, a large tent 
being used for the purpose. 

A recruit company composed of all the new men of the regi- 
ment received special instruction from Lieut. Rogers of Company 
A, detailed for that purpose and assisted by four regular army 
non-coms. 

On Friday, the 13th, an outpost and attack problem was 
worked out, the battalion making camp over night about five miles 

75 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

from main camp. The next day after a sham battle the regiment 
had instruction in individual cooking, using the mess kit. Two 
boiled potatoes, bacon, an onion and coffee formed the meal which 
the men prepared over small fires on grounds connected with Al- 
pha Farms. The regiment then marched back to main camp. 

Camp was broken Aug. 15 at 8 a. m. and the regiment en- 
trained at Sandwich at 1 1 a. m., Wakefield was reached at 5 p. 
irj., after a most interesting and enjoyable tour of duty. 

MOBILIZATION OF MILITIA 
Aug. 26. The mobilization of the entire state militia took 
place in Boston. Company A joined the regiment at 10.30. Ra- 
tions were served at 11.45 a. m. The head of the parade started 
at 12.30, the Sixth regiment moving about 1.15 p. m. After a 
march through the business district including Beacon, Washing- 
ton, State, Broad, Fligh and Summer streets, the parade termi- 
nated at Tremont st. Three officers and forty-eight men under 
Capt. Connelly participated. First Lieutenant Rogers was in 
command of first platoon and Second Lieutenant Hawkes in charge 
of second platoon. The company arrived home at 5.30 p. m. 

Oct. 4. Sgt. Baxter with Pvt. Harlow as assistant v/as ap- 
pointed to look after the interest of Basket Ball. 

FIELD DAY 

Oct. 20. The Richardson Light Guard observed its annual 
Fall Field Day with the customary target shoot in the afternoon: 
at Bay State Range followed in the evening with a Banquet. This 
64th anniversary with the exception of the Dedication was the 
largest aflFair ever held of this nature by the company. About 
400 were present. The Drill Flail was prettily decorated with 
American Flags and yellow and white bunting. The American Or- 
chestra of Wakefield pla3'ed enjoyable music during the banquet. 
Dill was caterer. 

In the afternoon owing to the rain and fog the company 
matches were not completed. On Oct. 23rd the matches were 
finished. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

At the banquet Lt. Charles E. Walton president of the Fine 
Members Association presented Capt. Connelly on behalf of the 
Association a beautiful set of Silk Colors. Capt. Connelly for 
the Company accepted the gift in a few well chosen words express- 
ing the appreciation of the Company. 

After a brief resume of the Company's work Capt. Connelly 
introduced Harris M. Dolbeare as toastmaster. 

The speakers were Congressman F. W. Dallinger, Representa- 
tive E. K. Bowser, Lt. Col. B. B. Buck, 9th U. S. Inf., Lt. Col. 
Stover 5th Mass. Inf., Chaplain Dusseault 6th Mass. Inf., Chair- 
man John J. Round of the Selectmen and Lt. Col. F. R. Robinson. 

November 8. Rendezvous drills for season 1915-16 were 
started on this evening with three officers and fifty-one men pres- 
ent. The remarkable steady attendance was continued. 

November 29. Three officers and sixty-one enlisted men re- 
ported for the regimental inspection by Lieut. Col. Damon, the 
company making an unusually fine appearance. 

A rendezvous drill was also held on this evening, the atten- 
dance being a record for a drill of this kind. 

December 1. Sergt. Augustus D. Baxter was appointed first 
sergeant. 

December 1 3. Capt. Connelly announced at the meeting 
that Major Azel Ames, a firm friend of the company had made a 
gift of a beautiful mahogany cabinet book case. This is used 
as a trophy cabinet in the large meeting room and has been much 
appreciated by the company. 

December 20. Rendezvous pay was distributed. 

December 27. A series of public entertainments was start- 
ed by Capt. Connelly to show the work of a military company. 
The first on this evening was similar to a "Day in Camp" given 
April 26. A company street was pitched on the drill floor and 
night life simulated, followed by reveille and usual drill routine. 
Cook tents and kitchens were set up and an imaginary meal served 
to the company. An exhibition of wireless work was staged by 
Private John Beebe, Jr., who furnished his ov/n equipment. Af- 
ter a drill and bayonet work was gone through, guard duty was 
exemplified. A basket ball game and military games followed. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The various patriotic organizations were guests at this public 
performance. 

There were two officers and fifty-one enlisted men present at 
this last drill of the year, closing a season of unprecedented at- 
tendance in the history of the Company. The rifle and pistol 
qualifications were also high during this year. 

1916 

Renewed interest in the military work of Co. A was manifest 
throughout the year and the Company had a record of attendance 
never before attained both in the regular drills and the Rendez- 
vous Drills. The officers and non-coms worked hard and faith- 
fully and had the satisfaction of seeing their efforts crowned with 
success. 

January 10. A remarkable attendance of 63 men and 3 of- 
ficers at the fourth Rendezvous Drill out of a total enrollment of 
64 enlisted, augured well for the future. 

January 17. The second entertainment of the series of "A 
Day in Camp" to interest the public in the company, was given on 
this evening. All the Catholic societies were invited and attend- 
ed well, showing much interest in the activities of the Company. 

As in the previous programs the Company went through the 
routine of camp pitching tents and turning in for a night's sleep. 
Then followed reveille and the day's work. After an exhibition 
drill athletic events were held, relay races, 40 yard dash and cart- 
ridge race. The spectators were well pleased with the evening's 
performance and the appearance and proficiency of the soldiers. 

The attendance at the regular drills this month showed a high 
average of 3 officers and 50 men. 

FEDERAL INSPECTION 

February 21. In accordance with orders the Company as- 
sembled for the Federal Inspection at 8 P. M. Lt. John R. Mc- 
Ginnes, U. S. A., was the inspecting officer. He was accompanied 
by Col. W. E. Sweetser and Capt. D. M. Stewart, 6th Mass. Inf. 
Other regimental officers were present as observers. 

78 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

This was without doubt the best inspection ever passed b]/' 
Co. A. Every officer and enlisted man was present out of a total 
enrollment of 3 officers and 65 men. Company movements pre 
gressed smoothly showing careful training. Much attention wa^: 
paid to individuals and squad work, which showed great proficier 
cy. 

The uniform worn was the olive drab service- 
campaign hat, canvas leggings and russet shoes. Haversack, can- 
teen and entrenching tools were hung from field belt. Shelter t^n^ 
roll contained blanket, poncho, poles and pins. 

March 20. Capt. Connelly outlined a trip to Washington 
for the inauguration in 1917 and emphasized the need of starting 
early to raise necessary expense funds. Later at meeting, Apri^ 
3, the captain suggested putting on a play for the purpose. Thf: 
Catholic Club who had some time previously held the play very 
successfully offered to help the Company by furnishing the entirr 
cast. The Company voted to accept the kind offer and agreed for 
each man to sell six twenty-five cent tickets and four thirty-five 
cent tickets. 

April 17. All societies which had not previously been invited 
to the Company's public exhibitions gathered at the armory on 
this evening. Those present included Elks, Eagles, Moose, Odd 
Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Clan McPhail and other citizens. A 
similar program to the other entertainments of "A Day in Camp" 
was gone through. Camp was pitched and Call to Quarters 
sounded. Then followed Reveille and the day's routine of drill. 
Pvt. Bert North gave an exhibition of club swinging (illuminated 
clubs). Camp songs were enjoyed, Pvt. L. Luken gave several 
cornet solos, and Cook Hubbard entertained with two Canadian 
dialect readings which were exceptionally well received. 

After the floor had been cleared athletic events followed — 40- 
yard dash, relay race, cartridge race. The Montcrief Twins fur- 
nished a skit, "The Gold Dust Twins", which pleased the audience. 

Those who attended were surprised at the fine exhibition of 
military work and the versatile ability of the volunteer soldiers. 

Fifty-four men and 3 officers reported for duty on this eve- 
ning. 

79 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

April 24. In the Town Bowling League the Company team 
finished in the fourth place winning a prize of $11.00. Pvt. D. 
C. Creedon won high total three strings, prize |5.00 and also high 
individual average or team. Sgt. J. E. Creedon, Cpl. M. J. Burns, 
Pvt. W. F. Burns and Wm. D. Seabury were the other members. 

May 8. A well contested Prize Drill was held on this eve- 
ning before a large audience. Dancing was enjoyed after the drill 
until 12 P. M., music by American Orchestra. 

May 19. On this evening, at the Princess Theatre, the Com- 
pany staged the play entitled, "The Hoodoo," cast by the Catholic 
Club. A tidy sum was realized which was put in the Washington 
Fund. The play was exceptionally well carried through, the cast 
being well selected from talented amateurs. This friendly co- 
operation of the Catholic Club was much appreciated by the Com- 
pany members who were putting much effort toward raising funds 
for the Washington Trip. 

May 28. Co. A took part in the exercises of Camp 39 
U. S. W. V. at Forest Glade Cemetery, 3 officers and 53 men re- 
porting. On return to the armory a luncheon was served by 
Camp 39. 

May 30. In the morning the Company participated in the 
parade and Flag Raising exercises at the Greenwood Hose House. 

Three officers and 62 enlisted men of the Company assisted 
Post 12 G. A. R. at the Memorial Day services in the afternoon. 

June 5. Capt. James H. Keough, I. S. A. P., officiated at the 
presentation of Marksman's Decorations to the Company mem- 
bers. 

June 14. At the Town Hall on this evening the Wakefield 
Lodge of Elks celebrated Flag Day. A short parade, in which 
Co. A. participated, from Elks Home to Town Hall preceded the 
program. 

MEXICAN BORDER CAMPAIGN 

About the middle of the month several of the regiments were 
nwbilized at Framingham for duty at the Mexican Border. War 

80 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

-with Mexico was threatened and rumors of German propaganda to 
involve the United States with Mexico were current. 

June 25. At midnight Capt. Connelly received orders from 
Regimental Headquarters to report for duty the next morning at 
Framingham Camp Grounds with two officers, eleven non-com- 
jniiissioned officers, cooks and kitchen field equipment. The cap- 
tain notified the members by telephone and reported as ordered 
at camp at 10.30 A. M., Monday, June 26. 

The 2nd, 5th, 8th and 9th called on June 19th were getting 
ready to entrain for the border that day and it became necessary 
for the 6th Regt. Details to take charge of all the recruits of these 
regiments to avoid delay. As the regiments which left took tents 
and equipment the Sixth Regt. details had considerable work laid 
•out in securing tentage and erecting it. setting up kitchens, procur- 
ing rations and cooking, and getting necessary blankets and cloth- 
ing to make the recruits comfortable. Working far into the night 
this was finally accomplished. 

The Co. A detail combined 90 recruits of Co. A and B of the 
2nd Inf. into one company and commenced a program of training 
for these men and equipping them for service. On July 10 the re- 
cruit companies left for the Mexican border showing good results 
from their instruction under trained men of the 6th. 

Lt. Fred H. Rogers was mustered into Federal Service with 
•other officers to take these men to the border, and experienced some 
service there. 

Co. A as usual scored a success in being first to completely 
■equip the Provisional Company, the officers and non-coms co-op- 
erating in a fine manner to perform the exacting work. 

June 30. The last Rendezvous drill of the season was ordered 
for this date and as the officers and non-coms were at Framingham 
Sgt. Edward E. Hickey was sent to Wakefield to take charge of the 
di-ill and prepare the payrolls. Later Lt. Hawkes reported. 



THE NEW NATIONAL GUARD 

June 30. An act of Congress passed June 3 made necessar}' 
Ihe taking of a new oath of enlistment and made the militia :i 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

new National Guard which under Federal control could be sent out 
of the State or country without consent of State authorities. 

At an ordered meeting on this date, Capt. Connelly who had 
come from Framingham, read the oath and explanations. It is 
significant of the calibre of the men who composed Co. A, that ev- 
ery man present agreed to take the new oath, although each had" 
the opportunity to gracefully withdraw from service if he so de- 
sired and avoid the possibility of being called later. There were 
but 3 of the entire enrollment of Co. A who did not take the new 
oath these being advised otherwise by the captain, for family 
reasons. 

During June the last rendezvous drill of the 1915-16 
season was held, after a remarkable average attendance for the 
ten drills of 59 enlisted men and 3 officers, a record truly gratify- 
ing to everyone. 

July 24. A special drill to prepare for annual camp duty 
was held, 2 officers and 55 men being present. 

The Annual Tour of Camp Duty 

Held at Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Mass. 

August 6th to August 20th, 1916. 

On August 6 the company assembled at the Armory and 
boarded electric cars, arriving at the South Station at 8.30 A. M., 
taking a special train the New Bedford, arriving at 11.30 A. M. 
The regiment was assembled and boarded a steamer which sailed 
out of New Bedford at 12.30 arriving at Edgartown 3.30 P. M. 
March was then taken up and the regiment went into camp about 
three miles below Edgartown. The camp site was very pictur- 
esque bordering on the ocean where excellent bathing was enjoyed. 
L'pon arriving, the regiment immediately pitched tents and soon 
the men were enjoying the scenery and the wonderful air for which 
the Vineyard is noted. The camp was named "Crocker Camp" 
in honor of Mr. George H. Crocker of Fitchburg for many years 
interested in the Regiment. 

Capt. E. J. Connelly was the only officer with the company, 
Lt. Rogers being on the Mexican border and Lt. E. B. Hawkes was 
detailed as adjutant of the battalion. 

82 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

It is very important to note that this tour of duty was the 
first that was ordered for two weeks, all of the previous camp tours 
being of eight days' duration. 

During the first week battalion drills, together with close and 
extended order work, engaged the entire program. 

Sunday, August 13, was given over to sports. The Edgar- 
town Carrol Club offered trophies for the winners in each event. 
Pvt. Brown won third place in the 200-yard dash and Pvts. Har- 
low and Beebe were first and second in the running hop, step and 
jump. 

The regiment left camp to attend the sports which were held 
in a field adjacent to Edgartown. Undoubtedly the inhabitants 
ol the little town witnessed one of the largest and best demonstra- 
tions of military functions when evening parade was given by the 
entire regiment after which a march through the principal streets 
of the town was made. The regiment arrived back in camp about 
7.30 p. m., tired and hungry but very happy. 

On Monday the regiment broke camp for the maneuvers 
^vhich took them practically over the northern portion of the Vine- 
yard. Short marches were made every day and difficult prob- 
lems were worked out very successfully. Company A under 
Capt. Connelly won much praise for the manner in which they 
entered into these exercises. The longest march was made the 
final day of the maneuvers when the regiment returned from the 
vicinity of Gay Head, the northern part of the island, to the 
camp situated on the extreme southern part of the Vineyard. 

On Sunday, August 20, the regiment broke camp and board- 
ed the steamer at Edgartown and returned to New Bedford. 
There the company was entrained and arrived in Wakefield at 
5.30 p. m. This tour of duty was no doubt the most enjoyable 
one the company ever participated in, the men being in wonderful 
condition and having benefited from the instructive military tac- 
tics learned. 



83 



11 isTORY Of Richardson Light Guard 
CELEBRATION AT FITCHBURG 

Sept. 16. in accordance with G. O. No. 7 Hq. 6th Inf. 
Mass. N. G. the company assembled Saturday at 11.30 a. m. to- 
take part in the celebration of the 100th anniversary of Co. B 
(Fitchburg Fusiliers) at Fitchburg, Mass. Leaving Wakefield 
Centre at 12.06 the company took the 1 p. m. train at North Sta- 
tion for Fitchburg arriving there at 2.30 p. m. 

The 6th Regt. paraded through the principal streets of the 
city after which electric cars were taken to grounds adjoining a 
large park outside the city where shelter tent camp was pitched. 
The next morning (Sunday) the regiment drilled two hours end- 
ing with an evening parade. 

At 2.30 p. m. the company entrained at Fitchburg and ar- 
rived at the armory about 5 p. m., Sunday, Sept. 17. 

FALL FIELD DAY AND SHOOT, 1916 

The annual Fall Feld Day Shoot was held on October 12, 
Columbus Day, at the Bay State Range, Wakefield. Many of 
the Fine Members together with the company, attended the shoot 
and the competition was very good. 

The Banquet was held in the armory on the evening of Oct. 
18. Capt. E. J. Connelly, after the banquet, made a brief speech, 
ol welcome and introduced the principal speaker of the evening, 
Adjutant General Gardner W. Pearson. The Adjutant General 
spoke at length on the subject of compulsory service, stating that 
all young men from the ages of 18 to 21 should have some military 
training. He also outlined the benefits derived from the service 
in the v/ay of discipline, efficiency and general good health due to 
physical exercises. 

The next speaker was the commander of the regiment. Col. 
Warren E. Sweetser, who commented on the wonderful record the 
company had in shooting, stating that it was regrettable that the 
Regimental match was omitted this year, because it meant the loss 
of another trophy. He further added that in looking around the 
walls of the armory he felt the company surely had their share of 
trophies. 

84 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Mr. Charles E. Walton spoke in behalf of the Fine Members 
of the company, again pledging unfailing support in all affairs 
held by the company and expressing well wishes for the future. 

Rev. W. H. Flynn of St. Joseph's Church gave the divine 
blessing. 

Jesse A. Dill of Melrose served a very appetizing banquet and 
the armory was tastefully decorated by the Farley Decorating 
Compan}' of Lawrence, Mass. 




Military Ball 

following the Anniversary Banquet Oct. 6, 1916 
Flashlight taken from balcony 



The committee on arrangements decided to try an innovation 
this year by omitting most of the speaking and having a grand 
ball directly after the banquet. The Woburn National Band 
was engaged for the music. Capt. and Mrs. Connelly led the 
military section of the grand march and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Wal- 
ton led the Fine Members. Practically every one in the armory 
participated in the grand march and the uniforms of the military 

85 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

officers together with the evening gowns of the ladies made a most 
impressive sight. A flash light photograph was taken by Mr. 
Leo E. Bourdon. 

Col. John H. McMahon presented the prizes won at the 
shoot on October 12. 

For all those who did not wish to dance, whist and other 
games were enjoyed in the small rooms of the armory. 

Oct. 3. G. O. No. 8 Hqrs. 6th Inf. Mass. N. G., announced 
six dates for non-commissioned officers' schools during drill sea- 
-son 1916-17, to be convened at South Armory, Boston, on follow- 
ing dates: Nov. 4, Dec. 16, Jan. 27, 1917, March 10, April 21, June 
2. These schools to be on Saturdays, opening at 8 P. M. and 
closing on next day (Sunday) at 3 P. M. Cots and blankets fur- 
nished in quarters at the Armory. Mileage at four cents to be 
allowed. 

Five regular drills were held in October, all being well at- 
tended. 

November. New regulations in June for the National Guard, 
allowed U. S. pay for 24 drills in each half-year beginning July 1, 
J916; first period ending Dec. 1, 1916. To qualify for this pay 
a company must have had present at each drill 60 percent of its 
.authorized enrollment otherwise none could receive pay. In Gr- 
ader to be on the safe side Capt. Connelly ordered five extra drills 
in November in addition to the four regular drills, all of which 
^•ere successful, the average of all drills being 3 officers and 56 
enlisted men; a very satisfactory showing. 

These drills required actual time spent of one and one-half 
hours on drill floor, school work not counting. 

December. Four regular drills were held this month. On 
Dec. 18 the public was invited to witness a drill, the company be- 
ing in full dress uniform and making a fine impression. 

During this year the public drills and entertainments did 
jnuch to educate the people regarding military training and gave 
Ihem a better idea of what their local company was accomplishing. 

86 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
1917 

Although President Wilson had been elected on a platform 
"He kept us out of War", the year 1917 was fraught with grave 
possibilities. 

A tenseness v/as felt in military quarters which was justified 
in the light of future events. This year the Richardson Light 
Guard was to be called on to make history filled with many sacri- 
fices, in order that "The world be made safe for Democracy". 

Jan. 2. Commencing with the first drill on this date the at- 
tendance for January was very good, three officers and fifty-four 
enlisted men being present. 

Jan. 8. On this evening the company assembled for Regi- 
rpental Inspection by Lt. Col. H. W. Damon, 6th. Mass. Inf. N. G. 
Three officers and fifty-nine enlisted men reported, five other men 
being unable to be present on account of employment at a dis- 
tance. 

During this month five regular drills were held with average 
attendance of three officers and fifty enlisted men. This was a 
busy month for the company with drawing contests and entertain- 
ments to raise money for the contemplated trip to Washington. 

Feb. 20. Capt. George W. Stuart, Inf U. S. A., inspected Co. 
A on Tuesday at 8.15 P. M., three officers and sixty-six enlisted 
men being present, only one man being absent through unavoid- 
able cause. An unusually fine inspection was passed. O. D. 
service uniform was worn and full field equipment carried (shelter 
tent roll, haversack, canteen, entrenching tool). 

Five regular drills were held this month with an average at- 
tendance of three oflicers and fifty-four men, a number unable ta 
attend being at work some distance away. 

Mar. 3. During the past year the company had been raising 
a fund to pay the expenses of a trip to Washington for the in- 
augural ceremony. Various drawing contests, entertainments^ 
basket ball games, etc., helped to bring considerable money, the 
balance necessary being contributed by those members intending 
to go. The total expense per man was about $30. 

About thirty-six members under command of Capt. Connelly 

87 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

snd Lt. Hawkes left Boston on the 6 P. M. train for Fall River 
where the boat was taken for New York. At Jersey City the 
Pennsylvania Road was followed to Washington where the Com- 
pany arrived late Sunday afternoon. During their stay here the 
Company was quartered at Mrs. Reinhart's and Mrs. Johnson's, 
Indiana Ave., where the Company had been on previous trip. 
In order that no man would be entirely without money, the Cap- 
tain each morning at roll call gave every man one dollar for 
lunches. 

Monday the Company took part in the Inaugural Parade with 
■other Massachusetts troops, making an excellent appearance. 

After two days of sight seeing the Company left on Wednes- 
day for home, returning over the Pennsylvania road to New York 
and Fall River line to Boston, arriving in Wakefield, Thursday 
morning, after a trip filled with interesting incidents. 

Drills were held on March 12, 19, 26, with the usual big 
attendance. 

While at Washington Lt. Hawkes left the Company for the 
Mexican Border being detailed for duty with the 16th U. S. Inf. 
remaining there until late in June when he returned to the Com- 
pany then at Camp Darling, Framingham. 



-.. - CHAPTER SEVEN 

CAPY. JAMES H. KEOUGH 

Excerpts From Wakefield Daily Item, Jan. 16, 1913 

Remembering all that marksmen past and present of Co. A- 
have done to mould its fame, we must pause to proclaim Qm. 
Sergt. James H. Keough (still an active member) as the greatest. 
He has been beaten, scores larger than his have been made, but 
for steadiness, consistency and qualities of leadership he stands 
supreme today, and has for a score of years. Colonel Gihon,. 
himself one of the company's best shots before the Spanish-Amer- 
ican War, said at the R. L. G. Reunion of 1909: 

"I have a personal acquaintance with all of Co. A's shots for 
the past 27 years and would like to speak of many of them, but 
time does not permit. There is one soldier in this company who 
deserves special mention, I refer to Sergeant James H. Keough, I 
think to him, miore than to any other, is due the splendid success 
of this company in rifle work. When I was in command of this 
company, Keough was my mainstay. Several times I had the- 
honor to command the regimental teams, but in every case Keough 
did the work and I got the credit." 

From Report of Colonel Smith W. Brookhart, Iowa N. G . 
Captain of the U. S. Palma Team, winners of the Long Range 
Championship of the World, with a record score, at Ottawa, Can., 
September 14, 1912. To Lieut. Gen. John G. Bates, U. S. A., 
President of the National Rifle Association of America. 

About 100 men altogether entered the tryout for the U. S. 
Palma Team, at Sea Girt, N. J., August 27, 1912. The scores 
made by the competitors in the Remington Expert Match, the Sea 
Girt Championship A4atch, the Wimbledon Cup Match, Leach 
Cup Match and Marine Corps Match were counted for the Palma 

tryout On Monday, Sept. 9, I directed that the 24 high 

men in the competition fire 15 shots at 1,000 yards before noon 
and the same number after noon, all firing at the same time. At 
the conclusion of this competition I selected 1 1 high men and for 
the twelfth man selected Sergeant James H. Keough, of Wake- 
field, Mass. Sergt. Keough was not present in the Remington 
Match (15 shots at 1,000 yards) * but, his record in all the other 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

matches, as well as the long range matches not counted in the 

tryout, was equal to the best man in the tryout The 

Palma Match at Ottawa was so arranged that two pairs would 




Capt. James H. Keough 



fire at the same time There was one defect in our organization 

and that was in coaches. Those best adapted for coaching had 
all been selected as firing members on the team. It was there- 

90 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

fore a happy event when Captain Stuart W. Wise, of Massachu- 
setts, appeared on the range and I immediately installed him as 
official coach giving him charge of the pairs on the right. It was 
then arranged that the pairs on the left should alternate coaching, 
each other and also alternate with Sergeant Keough as general 
coach between the pairs. While this system of coaching is effici- 
ent in the highest degree, still it is defective when necessary to be 
done by firing members of the team. The strain is too great on 
the eye for a man who must fire his score immediately afterwards. 
* Note: Sergt. Keough was prevented from accompanying the 
Massachusetts team to Sea Girt on account of death in the family 
but rejoined them later but, too late to participate in the Reming- 
ton Match and according to the rules of the tryout could not of- 
ficially be selected. But, as stated above in Colonel Brookhart's 
report, his shooting in all of the other matches was equalled the 
best man of the tryout and he was carried along for the purpose of 
being the official coach of the team, and due to circumstances 
which sometimes happen in all teams, he was ordered to shoot by 
the Team Captain and paired up with Sergt. Frank Kean of Wo- 
burn, Mass. The appearance of Captain Stuart W. Wise, an- 
other of Keough's shooting partners, was the happy event referred' 
to in Col. Brookhart's report as it took a burden off Keough's 
shoulders and enabled him to put up the largest individual score 
of the U. S. team and this in his 48th year. Bugler George W. 
Chesley, of New Haven, Conn., a Wakefield boy and former mem- 
ber of Co. A and a Spanish War Veteran, was also a firing member 
of this team. 



MILITARY RECORD OF MAJOR JAMES H. KEOUGH 

Enlisted on the thirtieth day of May, 1888, and mustered-in 
to the service of the State same date for three years, as a private in 
Company A, Sixth Regiment Infantry, Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. Continuous service in same company and regiment,, 
having served as private, bugler and Q. M. Sergt., until honorably 
discharged by reason of promotion; appointed Captain Ordnance 
Dept. on the 1st day of December, 1913. Re-Organization, ap- 
pointed Captain and Asst. Inspector of Small Arms Practice, July 
1, 1915; Captain National Guard Reserve, April 24, 1917; Placed 
on Mass. National Guard Retired List, with rank of Major, Jan- 
uary 17, 1919, at own request. 

U. S. Service: Enlisted in Co. A, Sixth Mass. Infantry, U. S. 
Volunteers, May 6, 1898, served as Quartermaster Sergeant during. 

91 



His'ioRY Of Richardson Light Guard 

the Spanish-American War, served in Porto Flican Campaign. 
Mustered out at Boston, Mass., January 21, 1899. 

WORLD WAR: Called into Federal Service, April 30, 1918. 
a^' Captain National Guard and assigned to Small Arms Firing 
School, Camp Perry, Ohio, as Instructor; Ordered to Camp Sevier, 
Greenville, S. Carolina, Oct. 10, 1918, to help in the final training 
of the 20th Division, then under secret orders to leave for France 
early in November, and under command of Brig.-General E. Leroy 
Sweetser, formerly Brigadier General Massachusetts N. G. Was 
at this station but a short time when he was ordered by the War 
Dept. to proceed to Commanding Officer, Infantry School of Arms, 
Columbus, Georgia, arriving November 5, 1918, was assigned 
tc the Department of Rifle and Pistol and remained at the school 
until July 23, 1919 when he was ordered to Caldwell, New Jersey, 
to the National Matches, for duties of Instructor and Range 
•Officer. 

At the completion of this duty he was ordered to Camp Dix, 
New Jersey, for discharge, services no longer required, where he 
got the usual 16 days leave, requesting that at the end of the 
furlough he be discharged from Camp Devens, Mass., as the 
nearest station to his home. On reporting to Camp Devens an 
order from the War Department, Washington, was handed him 
with instructions to report back to the Infantry School, Camp Ben- 
ning, Columbus, Georgia, for duty, Vi'here he was again assigned to 
the Department of Rifle and Pistol remaining at the School 'til 
February 19, 1920, v^'hen he was ordered by the War Dept. to 
proceed to Camp Eagle Pass, Texas, reporting on arrival to the 
Commanding Officer, 3rd U. S. Infantry, for duty. Captain 
Keough arrived at this station March 4, 1920, but instead of being 
set at his usual line of duty his duties were various and of a far 
different character. 

When he reported to the C. O., Colonel Paul Giddings, he was 
informed that while the regiment needed instruction in rifle and 
pistol practice there were hardly enough men in the companies to 
carry on the usual routine duty and furnish the necessary details 
and that there was such a dearth of officers that some of the officers 
had two or three companies and that he would be obliged to turn 
one of them over to him, and he was assigned to Co. I, 3rd U. S. 
Infantry. 

In a few days a Special Order No. 37, Camp Eagle Pass was 
issued which Capt. Keough states was the longest and most com- 
plex order he ever received and designated him as the responsible 
party to the following projects: Construction Quartermaster — 
Camp Utilities Officer — Salvage Officer and Camp Laundry Of- 

92 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ficer. To state that these different duties called for tact and expe- 
rience and led to a strenuous life is putting it mildly and owing to 
the scarcity of officers he also had to take his turn at Guard Duty 
which during his last month at this camp meant nearly every other 
day. Captain Keough was Officer of the Day the night that 
Obregon and his followers marched into Pedras Negres, situated 
directly across the Rio Grande from Camp Eagle Pass. On this 
particular night, owing to the lack of subsistence across the river 
the guard was doubled, every sentinel had a bandolier of ammuni- 
tion in addition to his belt full and was also armed with a "Gat" 
(45 Colt Automatic Pistol) and a plentiful supply of ammunition 
for the same. The supposed raid did not develop and from the 
receptions held the next day in which the officers from Camp 
Eagle Pass were invited to attend it was more of an entertainment 
than a bombardment. 

The construction work coming under Capt. Keough's 
supervision called for the finishing of a cement bridge 
over the Arroya which Vv'as started by Major George C. Burnett, 
his predecessor, and was completed before Capt. Keough left this 
station. Another project was the building of a spur track from 
the warehouses to the Southern Pacific R. R. and the finishing of 
a swimming pool and a Camp Bakery which called for the instal- 
lation of a 60 ton Middleby Oven. He was agent for a revolv- 
ing pay roll which amounted to 1 10,000 and on account of the 
scarcity of help and large wages exacted by U. S. laborers was 
forced to employ Mexican laborers who were granted passports 
allowing them to enter and leave the camp between certain hours. 
His utilities job included care and repair of all Government build- 
ings and he had hundreds of thousands dollars worth of every 
conceivable article necessary to build and equip the most exacting 
architectural structure, including bathroom fixtures, steam boilers 
and radiators, nails, lumber, cement, doors, sash, windows, etc., 
a Utilities company. with plumbers, carpenters, electricians, and 
painters. The Salvage Dept. consisted of a cobbling shop, a tail- 
or shop, and a junk shop, the latter being cleared out at intervals 
by sales to the highest bidder. That Captain Keough did make 
good in the execution of these different projects, was in a great part 
due to his experience in the handling of property and his line of 
duty in civil life, and it was further demonstrated when on re- 
ceiving orders from the War Department to proceed to Camp Per- 
ry, Ohio, to construct the Small Bore Range for the International 
shoot held in 1920, to get his clearance papers in five days from 
receipt of order. 

93 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Before leaving Eagle Pass he was handed a letter by the Com- 
manding Officer, which he stated he received some time ago and as 
it was very complimentary he thought Capt. Keough might like to 
keep the original and he would keep a copy for his files. 

Letter from Lt. Col. Morton C. Mumma, U. S. Cavalry. 
To Col. Paul Giddings, Commanding 3rd U. S. Infantry, Eagle 
Pass, Tex. 

I have just learned that Captain James H. Keough has been 
assigned to duty with your regiment. (The information did not 
come from Captain Keough) ! desire to take this opportunity of 
stating to you that 1 have known Captain Keough for 17 years 
during which time I have been closely associated with him in 
matters pertaining to the development of rifle training. When se- 
lecting my instructors for the Small Arms Firing School which I 
established and commanded during the war, Captain Keough was 
one of the first men placed on my list. He has for more than 20 
years been one of the foremost riflemen of this country and has 
done as much as perhaps any other man for its development. He 
was one of my most valuable instructors, and later a member of 
the corps of instructors at the Infantry School, Camp Benning, 
Columbus, Georgia, from which 1 understand he has just gone to 
join your regiment. 1 presume the purpose of his detail to your 
regiment is to assist in the development of rifle efficiency, and 
I assure you that the training of the officers and non-commissioned 
officers could not be placed in better hands. His knowledge of 
proper methods of individual training in marksmanship is not 
exceeded by that of any other man of my acquaintance and I 
know, that if given sufficient time and opportunity, he will fully 
justify the purpose for which he is sent to you. 

Morton C. Mumma, 
Major of Cav. D. O. L. 

Captain Keough arrived at Camp Perry, Ohio, June 5, 1920, 
and was assigned as assistant to the Quartermaster, Colonel Ward 
Dabney, U. S. A. He remained at this station until October 13, 
1920, when he received orders to proceed to First Corps Area, 
Boston, Mass., for discharge, services no longer required. He 
was dischargecl from the service of the United States, October 15. 
1920. While on duty at Camp Perry, July 19, he was ordered to 
report for examination permanent appointment Ordnance, but 
after due deliberation decided to pass it up and return to his for- 
mer civil employment as State Armorer, Wakefield, which position 
he still holds. On February 25, 1921, he was commissioned as 
Captain Ordnance, Officers Reserve Corps, U. S. A., for 5 years 

94 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

and was placed on active duty each year for the duration of the 
National Matches, Camp Perry, Ohio, as Instructor in small arms 
at the Citizens' Training Camp preceding the matches. He was 
reappointed in 1926 in the grade and section then held but de- 
clined to serve longer having seen nearly 38 years of continuous 
military service. Major Keough has received many decorations 
for excellence in rifle and pistol work and for excellence in the 
manual of arms but none are cherished more dearly than the let- 
ter sent him by the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. Army, which is ap- 
pended : 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ORDNANCE 

Washington 

March 4, 1926. 
A'lajor James H. Keough, 
52 Crescent Street, 
Wakefield, Mass. 
My dear Major Keough: 

1 have noted with regret that you have decided not to accept 
reappointment in the Ordnance Officers' Reserve Corps by reason 
of your having reached the age when you believe you should re- 
tire. 

I desire to express to you at this time the appreciation of the 
Ordnance Department for your work and your services in the past 
and particularly during the World War when your labors in con- 
nection with small arms maintenance were of very great assistance. 

Your work for the past thirty years in the instruction of small 
arms practice and in the encouragement of rifle shooting, not only 
in your own State but throughout the whole of the United States, 
is well known to this Department and in this also you have been 
of inestimable value to your country. 

May I wish you much comfort, happiness and well deserved 
-ease in your retirement. 

Cordially yours, 

C. C. Williams. 
Major General, Chief of Ordnance, 
U. S. Army. 

95 



CHAPTER EIGHT 
COMPANY H— 12th REGIMENT— M. S. G. 

With the departure of the various units of Massachusetts 
National Guard to the various camps in connection with the entry 
of the United States into the World War, the different committees 
throughout the state where National Guard Units had been quar- 
tered, took steps to organize companies for home guard duty to 
take the place of the departing units. 

On Friday evening, March 30, 1917 at the State Armory, a 
company of Home Guards was formed, about seventy-five men 
signing up on the first papers and several drills were held during 
the following month. 

In the meantime, the state authorities were taking steps to or- 
ganize a State Guard and on A4ay 7, the members of the 
Wakefield Home Guard, held a meeting in the State Armory, to 
consider the State Guard proposition, in its bearing on the liabil- 
ity to act on guard duty outside of the town, or, in other words, 
in any part of the state. Many showed a disinclination to con- 
tinue in the company on this basis, but a petition was drawn up, 
asking for the formation in this town, of a State Guard Company; 
and a number of signatures were received and the petition for- 
warded to the governor. May 22, 1917, with request of inspection 
of recruits on May 28. Drills of the Home Guard Company, in 
the meantime, had been going on under the direction of Col. John 
H. McMahon, M. N. G., retired. 

MUSTERED INTO SERVICE 

On June 20 the signers of the petition went through the neces- 
sary medical examination and 60 men were mustered into the 
service of the Commonwealth, as the 62nd Company M. S. G., by 
Col. H. P. Ballard, M. V. M., retired. Lt. Col. McMahon then 
announced the appointment by the governor of the following of- 
ficers: 

CAPT. Lt. Col. John H. McMahon, M. N. G., retired. 
Former commander of Company "A" of the 6th 
regiment and for many years a member of that 
company, also a Spanish War Veteran. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

1st Lt. Sgt. John L. Downing — for 12 years member of 

Company "H", 5th Regiment, M. N. G. 
2nd Lt. William B. Feindel — a former member, for about 
nine years, of Company "A" of the 6th Regiment, 
also a Spanish War Veteran. 
From this date, regular weekly drills were held and addi- 
tional drills quite frequently, as the members showed considerable 
interest in the work. 




Capt. John L. Downing 

Co. H, State Guard 



About the first of August, regiments were formed of the State 
Guard and the 62nd company was assigned to the 12th Regiment 
M. S. G. as Company "H". 

On August 7, Capt. John H. McMahon was commissioned as 
Major in the 12th Regiment. 

On August 26th, 1st Lt. John L. Downing was commissioned 
as Captain of the company. 

2nd Lt. William B. Feindel was commissioned 1st Lt. and 
1st Sgt. Francis H. Marion was commissioned 2nd Lt. 



97 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On August 26, 1917, most of the members of the old company 
"A", 6th regiment, M. N. G., who had been home on a farewell 
visit, assembled at the armory and marched out at 10.00 a. m. for 
a short parade through the town to the railroad station where they 
entrained for Ayer, their last appearance in Wakefield as an or- 
ganization. Company "H", 12th Regiment, M. S. G., acted as 
their escort on this occasion, the tlrst appearance of the company 
outside of the armory. 




Co. H, State Guard at Gowing's Farm, 1917 



FIELD DAY 

Regular weekly drills were held in the armory mostly con- 
sisting of close order work, although during the early part of Sep- 
tember, the company had some practice in extended order; ar- 
rangements were made about the middle of September to hold a 
Field Day during that month. In compliance with Company 
Order No. 1, the company assembled in the armory on Saturday, 



History Of Richardson Ligwt Guard 

September 22, 1917, at 1.30 p. m., and in light marching order, 
proceeded to hike seven miles to a camp site previously selected 
by the officers in North Wilmington, the old Gowing Farm. 
Transportation was furnished by Sgts. Feindel and Knox for the 
camp equipage. The weather was pleasant and the company 
made good showing in making their first camp. The night 
turned out rather cold, ice forming on the water in the cook house 
and making it necessary to keep a camp fire going most of the 
night; the company had no regular camp equipment, the tents be- 
ing borrowed and the members bringing such bedding material as 
they deemed necessary, in man}' cases being inadequate for the oc- 
casion. 

Several skirmish drills were held on the 23rd and short move- 
ments, under the instructions of Maj. McMahon. This trip proved 
very instructive to the men as most of them had never participated 
in any military work prior to their enlistment in the company; 
it might be well to remark that most of the company were men 
who were exempt from regular service in the war on account of 
age or physical disability. 

On October 7, 1917, the company proceeded to Winchester 
to take part in its first battalion drill, under command of Maj. 
McMahon who was the Battalion Commander. 

Three more battalion drills were held during the month of 
October. On October 22, in compliance with G. O. No. 13, a com- 
mittee was appointed from the members of the company, to as- 
sist in putting across the sale of bonds for the second Liberty Loan. 
On November 26, the company received its first official visit from 
the Regimental Commander, Col. H. P. Ballard. The company 
turned out for drill with full ranks and was complimented by 
the Colonel, not only for attendance and appearance, but also for 
its drill work. 

About the first of January, 1918, arrangements were made by 
the Wakefield Club to put on a show to raise funds for the com- 
pany, which up to this time had no way of obtaining funds, ex- 
cept by personal subscriptions of the members. This show took 
place Thursday evening, Jan. 24, 1918, at the "Princess Theatre" 
and a goodly amount was realized for the company's fund. 

On January 24 the company furnished its first firing squad 
in connection with funeral services of Herbert Edgar Biggs of 
the 35th Squadron of the Aviation Corps from the residence of 
his family at Greenwood. 

The regular drills and numerous additional drills were held 
during the winter months. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On April 6 the company, as part of the regiment, participated 
in a parade in Boston, practically all officers and men of the com- 
pany being present. 

On May 26 the company assembled at the armory at 2.00 p. 
m. and acted as escort to Corporal Chas. F. Parker Camp, U. S. 
W. v., in connection with their memorial services at Montrose. 
Again on Memorial Day, May 30, the company acted as escort to 
H. M. Warren Post No. 12 G. A. R., in their annual observance. 

CAMP DUTY 

It was not decided until the first of July that there would be 
a regular tour of camp duty for the State Guard. In accordance 
with instructions, Company "H" assembled in the armory, July 
25, and proceeded by trolley to Framingham, arriving at the 
camp grounds 9.30 p. m., the m.ess sergeant and cook having gone 
forward the day before. This was the first experience in regular 
tour of camp duty by most of the members of the company. 
However, considerable attention had been given by officers and 
non-comm.issioned officers of the company in instructions as to de- 
tails of camp duty before starting for camp, and as a result, the 
company made a very creditable showing during the tour. Al- 
though the camp lasted four days and there were thirteen com- 
panies in the regiment, including supply company. Company "H" 
was honored on July 28 by the selection of Capt. Downing as 
Officer of the Day. On July 29, the tour being completed, the 
company returned to its home armory, much benefitted by the 
experience and orders were issued that drills would be suspended 
until the middle of September. 

MANY COMPLIMENTS 

It is worthy of mention that during the tour of duty, July 27, 
was set aside as Governor's Day and the camp visited by the 
Lieut. Governor, Adjutant General and staff. During his visit 
to the camp, Lieut. Governor Coolidge, afterwards Governor and 
later President of the United States, accompanied by the Adjutant 
General and several officers of his staff and officers of the company, 
made a personal inspection of every tent on "H" Company 
Street. He expressed himself as gratified with the appearance 
of the tents and equipment, also the appearance of the company 
members then in the company streets and stated that this was 
what he expected from the Wakefield Company, which had al- 
ways occupied a prominent place in the militia of the Common- 
wealth. 

100 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

WEEK-END CAMP 

Regular drills were resumed on September 16 and at that 
drill it was decided to hold a week-end camp on Kelley's Farm in 
North Wilmington. Accordingly, on Saturday afternoon, 
September 21, the company assembled at the armory and at 3.00 
p. m. started over the road for North Reading in light marching 
■order. This was a very enjoyable and instructive occasion. 
Inhabitants of North Wilmington, especially those in the vicinity 
of the camp, went to considerable trouble to help the compan>' 
in many ways, such as sending gifts of vegetables and fruits to 
the company's cook besides a quantity of home cooked food for 
the Sunday dinner. 

Beginning with the drill of September 23 the officers and non- 
commissioned officers of the company, took up the instruction of 
drafted men who had not yet been called. This was in accord- 
ance with directions issued by the Adjutant General's Office. The 
members of the company showed a lively interest in this matter 
and arrangements were made so that drafted men could drill any 
night that they desired. 

On November 1 1 word was received of the signing of the 
A.rmistice of the World War and arrangements were made for 
the citizens of Wakefield to celebrate this event. A parade was 
held under the Command of Maj. McMahon, as Chief Marshal 
and consisted of Company "H", G. A. R., Spanish War Veterans, 
Red Cross and all fraternal and civic societies of the town. 

IN BOSTON PARADE 

On November 12, in accordance with telephone instructions 
from Col. Ballard, Regimental Commander, this company went 
to Cambridge by motor truck and joined the 12th Regiment there 
assembled at 12.00 noon. At 1.00, the Regiment proceeded to 
Boston to take part in the Military parade in that city in com- 
memoration of the signing of the Armistice. Nearly the entire 
personnel of the company turned out to this parade. 

On December 9, the company received an unexpected visit 
from Col. Ballard, Regimental Commander. A lively drill was 
held in both close and extended order. Various movements were 
■called for by the regimental commander and at the close of the 
drill, the Colonel complimented both officers and men of the com- 
pany on their excellent showing. He also stated that in all of his 
Military experience, he had not seen some of the movements called 
for, executed so well in such short time, as by "H" company that 
night. 

lOI 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On Feb. 27, 1919, 1st Sergt. Henry A. Feindel was commis- 
sioned 2nd Lieut, in place of Francis H. Marion, resigned on ac- 
count of ill health. 

Regular weekly drills were held through the winter. A 
Regimental indoor shoot was ordered and all but three of the 
companies participated, each company shooting in its own armory 
under supervision of officers assigned by the Colonel. Although 
"H" Company upheld the past traditions of Wakefield by finish- 
ing with the highest score among the companies taking part, no 
trophy was ever awarded. 




2nd Lt. Henry A. Feindel, 

Co. H, State Guard 



On March 20, the company was inspected by Maj. Benjamin 
R. Vaughn and made a good showing both in drill and attendance^ 
only four members being absent from inspection, two of these with 
leave. 

YANKEE DIVISION PARADE 

On Friday, April 25, 1919, in accordance with R. G. O. No. 
6 and Company Orders No. 3, the members of this company 

102 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

left for Cambridge where they joined the balance of the regiment 
and marched to Boston where, with the whole State Guard, they 
participated in the Parade of the Yankee Division. On May 19 
at the regular drill, Maj. Connelly, 104th Regiment U. S A., a 
former commander of "A" company, who had distinguished him- 
self during his service in the World War, delivered a talk to the 
company on the events in France during the World War and on 
the methods of warfare used. 

Once more it became the privilege of the company to partici- 
pate in Memorial Exercises and on May 25 acted as escort to 




Athletic Prizes Won by State Guard Co. 

Left to right: Athletic Meet, July 25, 1919; Baseball Champion, 
12th Regt., July 25, 1919; Elks' Parade, 1920 

•Corp. Chas. Parker Camp U. S. W. V. in their Exercises at Mont- 
rose. Included were a number of veterans returned from the 
World War. On May 30, the company acted as escort to H. M. 
Warren Post No. 12 G. A. R., in their Memorial Day Services. 

FULL RANKS IN CAMP 
Regular company drills were held until July 15. On July 
19, in accordance with G. O. No. 18— A. G. O. C. S. and R. O. No. 



103 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

10 — C. S., the company assembled at the armory at 2.00 p. m. 
and proceeded by auto bus to Camp Robert Bancroft, Boxford, 
Mass., for the annual tour of camp duty from July 19 to 26, in- 
clusive. One week before starting for camp, all the previous two 
year term enlistments having run out June 20, the company was 
reduced in strength to thirty-three men, a condition existing in 
practically every company in the state guard. However, it is 
worthy of mention that "H" company went into camp with its 
full enlistment of three officers and sixty-one men. The first 
day in camp, one man was discharged at his own request for busi- 
ness reasons to make room for an extra recruit who was waiting to 
be mustered in. This was the only company in the regiment that 
reported full strength, the nearest company having about fifty 
men and some less than forty. Despite new recruits the company 
made an excellent showing and at the officers' meeting on July 
23, the Colonel, in presence of all the officers of the regiment, 
complimented the captain of "H" company on the remarkable 
showing of his company. During the tour of duty, base ball 
and athletic contests were held and Company "H" won the Regi- 
mental Base Ball Championship, also the Regimental Athletic 
Championship and two of the three prizes in the individual drill. 
After returning from camp, there was a short term of rest 
from drills which were resumed in September. 

BOSTON POLICE STRIKE 

On September 10. in accordance with telephone instructions 
from Regimental Commander, the company assembled in the 
armory at 1.30 p. m. and proceeded to Cambridge where they 
joined the Regiment for Guard duty in connection with the strike 
of the Boston Police Force. 

On arrival at Cambridge, one lieutenant and thirty-nine men 
from "A" Company, were attached to Company "H", bringing 
the total strength to four officers and ninety-three men. The 
company were sent at once by fast motor truck to Brighton and es- 
tablished themselves at Police Station No. 14. After a short con- 
sultation between company commander and police captain of 
station No. 14, one platoon in charge of 1st Sergt. Bonney and the 
balance of the com.pany under Capt. Downing, with 1st Lieut. 
W. B. Feindel leading 1st Platoon and second Lieut. H. A. Fein- 
del, leading second platoon, moved into Market Square. Flere 
an immense mob had gathered, blocking up the square and ad- 
jacent streets where a serious disturbance was underway. After 
quiet had been restored and the mob dispersed, seven Cossack 

104 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Posts were thrown out covering the District from Market Square 
to Oak Square and to the Charles River. The more quiet resi- 
dential sections adjoining Brookline, were covered by patrols. 

On September 13, orders were received from A. G. O., in- 
creasing complement of companies to 100 men. 2nd Lieut. 
Feindel, with one sergeant and clerk was detailed to Wakefield on 
recruiting duty, where eight recruits were enlisted the first day. 

On September 14, the company v/as transferred to the Cam- 
bridge Armory and from that point, covered station No. 10 Rox- 
bury Crossing District until Sept. 22nd, travelling back and forth 
by motor trucks. 

On September 22, the company was moved to the Municipal 
Building, Dudley Street Station No. 9 District, Roxbury, with 
company "C" and "E" and Machine Gun company 12th regiment. 
The company remained at this point until October 15, when they 
returned to Cambridge for several days and were then detailed 
to Ronan Park, Dorchester Station No. 1 1 District, remaining 
there two days and then back to the Cambridge Armory. 

On October 25 the forces in Boston were reduced by one-half 
and provisional regiments were formed. Capt. Downing was 
assigned commander of new 5th company, 1st Provisional Regi- 
ment, consisting of 110 men in which were included from "H" 
company, one supply sergeant, one mess sergeant, one sergeant, 
two corporals, two cooks, one musician and thirty-four privates. 
The entire second battalion, of which the fifth company was 
part, proceeded to the old Seigel Bldg., Washington and Essex 
streets, Boston, and established quarters at that point under com- 
mand of Maj. Benjamin R. Vaughn, who was later relieved at his 
own request. Capt. Downing acted as Battalion Commander 
until November, 1919, when further reductions in force were made. 

Capt. Downing was assigned to 9th company, third pro- 
visional Regiment also consisting of 110 men and including from 
"H" company, one supply sergeant, two sergeants, one musician, 
one cook and twenty-two privates. The balance of the members 
of "H" company who had been in fifth company, 1st Provisional 
Regiment, were returned to their home armory. 

On November 26, at his own request for business reasons, 
Capt. Downing was relieved. The balance of members of "H" 
company who were serving in the ninth company, third Provision- 
al Regiment, were not relieved until Dec. 18, 1919, at which time 
5ll of the Military Forces were relieved from duty in Boston. 

Drills continued through the winter of 1919-1920, but in- 
terest commenced to fall off owing to the fact the members realized 
the days of the State Guard were numbered and it was only a 

105 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

matter of time when they would make place for the new National 
Guard company then being recruited. 

On May 30, the company again took part in the memorial ser- 
vices of the departed veterans of the Civil, Spanish and World 
Wars and acted as escort to Spanish War and World War Veterans 
in their exercises at Montrose. 

Nothing further of interest took place until the company was 
mustered out on November 1, 1920, the new National Guard 
Company having been formed under command of Capt. Thomas 
J. Quinn. 



106 



CHAPTER NINE 

COMPANY A IN THE WORLD WAR. 

RUMORS OF WAR. 

Mar. 22, 1917. Various rumors about this time seemed to 
indicate that a crisis was impending in the United States and that 
it was inevitable we would be drawn into the conflict that already 
had involved the European countries. This meant that the Na- 
tional Guard would at once be called to service, as the strength 
of the regular Army was only about 100,000 men scattered through 
the United States, Philippines, Hawaii, Porto Rico, and Canal 
Zone. The National Guard numbered about 120,000. 



30 TODNG 
HEN 

WAHIED 
NOW 

TO SHOW REAL PATRIOTISM 

J0ilCaA,6TH 



STATE ARHORY. WAKEFIELD 

nr to Capt U.Cennelly. 456 Main Street 

TFTT 

War Recruiting Poster 

Mar. 30, 1917 



MEN WANTED 

FOR MMEDIATE SERVICE 

-JOIN- 
CO. A 
GthREGT. 





STATE ARHORY, WAKEFIELD 

OFEN 9.O0 A. BL TO 10.00 F. K. 



Recruiting Poster 

March, 1917 



Anticipating an early call. Col. Sweetser advised company 
commanders to get a waiting list of recruits at once. Capt. Con- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

nelly issued a call for about 30 men which would bring the enroll- 
ment up to 100, the expected number which would be required. 
Ten men had applied by March 26. Letters were sent to pa- 
triotic societies in Wakefield, Reading, and Lynnfield urging young 
men to join Company A, but no enthusiasm was noticeable: in 
fact, there seemed to be a general apathy regarding enlisting 
which was very surprising, considering the fact that Company A 
had a fine record, and Wakefield apparently such a good military 
town. 

Personal efforts of the officers and men were used to the ut- 
most to stimulate recruiting. The Wakefield Daily Item gen- 
erously supplied full-page ads with large cut of soldier in the in- 
terest of recruiting and gave much publicity in news and editorial 
columns to help the cause. 



ROSTER OF CO. A, 6th Mass. Inf., N. C, March 26, 1917 



Capt. Edward J. Connelly 
1st. Lt. Fred H. Rogers 
2nd Lt. Edsar B. Hawkes 
1st Sgt., Baxter, Augustus D. 
Mesfs Sgt., Findlay, John, Jr. 
Sup. Sgt., Evans, Frederick G. 

Serjeants 
Murray, John T. 
Hickey, Edward E. 
Creedon. Jeremiah E. 
Davis, Harold F. 
Burns, Mathew J. 
Stone, George W. 

Corporals 
Quinn, Thomas J. 
Thompson, Clarence A. 
Eastman, Ernest R. 
Better, Edward F., Jr. 
Brown, James G. 
Burrag-e, George A. 

Cooks 
Hubbard, Alfred J. 
Buckley, Joseph J. 

Bug-lers 
Findlay, James W. 
Cheever, Carl I. 

Mechanic 
Holden, Herbert W. 



Cayting, Aubrey B. 
Corcoran, Thomas F. 
Dillaway, George L. 
Edgar, Brent M. 
Goodridg-e, Carl W. 
Harlow, Melburn N. 
Holoway, Percie U. 
Jeffrey, Charles F. 
Lee, John J. 
Little, Cyrus A. 
Luken, Roy E. 



McCuUough, John W. 
Nelson, Harry E. 
Sargent, George D. 
Stone, Otis L. 
Walsh, Arthur T. 
Walsh, Thomas F. 
Brockbank, John C. 
Fish, Crowell G. 
Seabury, William D. 

Privates 
Barry, Augustine C. 
Beane, Raymond J. 
Beeler, Cornelius H. 
Behrle. Joseph F. 
Brockbank, Gray B. 
Butler, John M. 
Comey, Francis W. 
Creedon, Charles B. 
Crowley, John J. 
Cummings, Timothy B 
Derby, John W. 
Dillaway, Manson M. 
Dingle, Arthur L. 
Doucette, Charles H. 
Fay, Edward M. 
Foster, Harold H. 
Gersinovitch, Saul C. 
Griffith, Howard W. 
Harper, Robert E. 
Heningar, John N, 
Huestis, George B. 
Luken, Lawrence A. 
Marchetti, Frank F. 
McCarthy, Frank E. 
McLaughlin, Andrew P. 
Meuse, Thomas P. 
.Nutile, Charles C. 
Singer, Robert L. 
Toth, Stephen F. 
Williams, Alexander 
Wright, Roy H. 



G. 



108 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
FINE MEMBERS' ASSOCIATION MEETS 

The Richardson Light Guard Fine Members' Association 
held a large and enthusiastic meeting at the Armory and offered 
every assistance possible in case the Company should be called 
out. This Association was the nucleus of the Citizens' War Re- 
lief Committee formed later. 

Mar. 26. At a town meeting, March 26, Moderator Eaton 
appointed a War Relief Committee consisting of E. K. Bowser, 
John J. Round, J. Warren Poland, S. B. Dearborn, S. K. Hamil- 
ton, C. N. Winship, F. H. Marion, W. J. Barrett, T. E. Dwyer, 
George E. Walker, Michael Low, E. C. Miller, Col. John" H. 
McMahon, R. H. Pierce, H. A. Feindel, A. H. Thayer, S. O. Rich- 
ardson, C. E. Walton, Dr. J. W. O'Connell and H. M. Dolbeare. 

March 27. Company A turned out and paraded through the 
center of town sounding bugle calls to attract attention to their 
recruiting campaign. At this date the strength of company, 
counting men not examined, was 86 men and 2 officers, Lieut. 
Hawkes being on detached duties at Mexican border with 16th In- 
fantry since March 4. 

WAR RELIEF COMMITTEE MEETS 

March 27. The Citizens' War Relief Committee at a meet- 
ing in the Armory voted to raise |5,000 for use in aid of dependent 
families if Company A was called out, and to purchase a small 
motor truck for the Company. The following committee was 
appointed — Col. John H. McMahon, C. N. Winship, George E. 
Walker, Capt. C. A. Cheney, Paul W. Mortimer, Albert J. Walton, 
W. F. Barrett. The meeting also voted to organize a Home 
Guard Company among the married or single men of 35 years or 
older, to replace Company A; 1 1052 was pledged, C. N. Winship 
starting the fund with a donation of |500. It was voted to pur- 
chase the truck at a cost of about |850 or $900, and to present to 
Co. A $1,000. Committee on purchase of truck: Dr. C. L. 
Sopher, G. E. Campbell, Henrv A. Feindel, Wm. E. Knox, Ernest 
G. Willard. 

March 29. Heywood-Wakefield Company subscribed $800 
to the Relief Fund, representing one dollar for each employee. 

COMPANY A CALLED TO SERVICE 

Friday, March 30. Sensing that something was in the air, 
Capt. Connelly went home to an early supper. Shortly after five 
o'clock the telephone rang and on answering, a voice said to the 

109 




Maj. Edward J. Connellj' 

Capt. Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., N. G. Sept. 1914 to Sept. 1917 
Captain Co. G, 104th Inf. (World War) 

Adjutant 104th Inf. (World War). 
Promoted Major 104th Inf. (World War) 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

captain, "This is Col. Sweetser talking. The Sixth Regiment has 
been called out. You will assemble your company at the Armory 
and await further orders". Taking a small book containing an. 
alarm list from his pocket, Capt. Connelly immediately got in 
touch by telephone with his squad leaders and ordered them to get 
in touch with the men on their lists and report at the Armory. 
Motorcycles owned by Cheever and Holden were used to assist in 
rounding up the men and by seven o'clock nearly the entire com- 
pany had assembled. Privates Fay, Hnestis and McLaughlin in 
Springfield, Williams in Fall River, Sergt. Murray and Cook Hub- 
bard in Lowell were reached by telegraph and reported later. 
The news had traveled quickly through the town, causing consid- 
erable excitement and large crowds lined the sidewalks as Com- 
pany A marched up and down Main st. Only seven recruits 
applied, however. 

An inspection of equipment was made to determine the nee<!s 
of the Company for field duty. Orders were received to recruit 
the Company to 100 men. The Company was quartered at the 
Armory, although men who resided in Wakefield were given per- 
mission to go home but required to report at roll call in the morn- 
ing. Drills and instruction periods were at once put in force and 
attention given to securing the required clothing and equipment 
for fitting out the recruits. Here Capt. Keough, the armorer, 
gave valuable assistance and was of great help in other ways. It 
became necessary, owing to nev/ orders, to make and fill out many 
sets of new papers and service records, for every individual. This 
was a long and tedious job, causing the clerks many hours of work 
day and night to complete the data, which was all typewritten. 
Mr. John D. Beyer of Greenwood volunteered his services and ren- 
dered great assistance to the company clerks in the typing. 

April 1. Company A marched through town with Harper's 
band and the Fife and Drum Corps. Company H of Stoneham 
participated to help recruiting. 

April 2. Company A had been contesting with Company H 
of Stoneham in the inter-town tournament and on this evening 
played and won the third and deciding basketball game and 
prize. 

The new Stuart Motor Truck had been presented to the Com- 
pany after having been inspected by the committee and put in run- 
ning order by Joseph J. Hughes, proprietor of Hughes' Garage. It 
was immediately used in making trips to Framingham Arsenal 
for supplies and enabled the company to secure the necessary 
equipment much quicker. It proved to be a very valuable asset 

111 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

to the company throughout their service until returned to the Pub- 
lic Safety Committee in October, 1917, and was a source of envy 
to the other companies in the regiment. 

Recruits were put through a rigorous course of instructions. 
Here again the truck became useful, transporting men to the Ba>- 
State Rifle Range in groups, greatly facilitating the rifle work, 
particularly of the new men. 




Co. A in April, 1917, Just After the Call to Service 



On April 3 the strength of the Company was 95 enlisted men 
and 3 officers. The men were allowed to get their meals at home if 
they so wished, but ration money was allowed by government for 
men provided for at Mortimer's Restaurant. This method elim- 
inated considerable work of handling rations in usual way and 
made cooking unnecessary at the Armory. 

Recruits, despite the active campaign, came slowly, although 
only six were needed, disproving the famous words of that noted 
statesman, Mr. Bryan, that if a call came "A million men would 
spring to arms over night". 



112 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

TWENTY-EIGHT RECRUITS WHO ENLISTED TO 
MAKE UP 100 QUOTA 



Bannau, John T. 
Blancliard, Leon A. 
Byrnes, Fred H. 
DeRoche, George B. 
Doucette, Jeremiah W., 
Baton, Nathan W., Jr. 
Fairbanks, Ernest B. 
Ferrick, Josepli M. 
Forrest, William M. 
Fraughton, George P. 
•Galvin, Daniel H. 
Glynn, Charles M. 
Hale, Albert F. 
Hutchinson, Earl R. 



Lawler, Frank B. 
Lucey, Joseph A. 
aicNally, James P. 
Melanson, Edward J. 
Mortimer, Harold E. 
Perkins, Geor.ae S. 
Rebenacker, Edward K. 
Stanley, Calvin R. 
Sullivan, William H. 
Walsh. Patrick 
Wenzell, William L. 
White, George A. 
Widen, John M. 
Williams, George B. 



CONGRESS DECLARED WAR AGAINST GERMANY 

April 6. Congress declared war against Germany on this 
•date. Realizing the slowness of recruiting throughout the coun- 
try and the enormity of the task, measures were formulated by 
Congress to put in force draft laws necessary to raise millions for 
■duty. 

At last Company A received the required number of recruits 
to make the 100 enrollment and at noon was formally mustered 
into United States Service by Capt. Golderman, C. A. C, after 
army medical officers had that day physically examined anrl 
passed the company. 

CO. A ORDERED TO FORT REVERE 

The Coast Defense authorities of Boston Harbor had asked 
for a company of Infantry to reinforce the artillery unit at Fort 
Revere, Hull, Mass. It is a compliment to Company A and its 
friends, that Col. Sweetser decided that Company A was to be re- 
lied on, and best fitted to perform the service, and ordered the 
•Company to proceed to Fort Revere the next morning. This 
•order came about 9.30 in the evening while a meeting of the Public 
Safety Committee was in session. 

All through the night the ofikers and men worked feverishly 
to complete records, equipping of the Company and preparing 
baggage for transportation. Here again our Fine Members' 
Association, or Public Safety Committee, as it was then termed 
(having merged with the town committee) proved to be valuable 
friends. The Transportation Committee secured large trucks of 
Henry A. Feindel, H. F. Miller Company, G. E. Moncrief, Mor- 
rison-Skinner Company, and William E. Knox to carry the men 



113 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

and baggage to Fort Revere. William E. Arnold used his tour- 
ing car to carry the officers. 

April 7. Company A assembled about 8.15 for roll call, af- 
ter which they were allowed to meet their relatives and friends 
before final assembly. Long before 8 a. m. the Armory was 
crowded with fathers and mothers, sisters, wives and sweethearts 
of the Company A soldiers. While it was felt that the regiment 
would not be sent far away for some time, still there was the un- 
certainty of what might happen and in many cases leave-takings 
were pathetic and sad, as well they might have been considering 
the casualties which took place in later months. The boys, how- 
ever, kept a smiling front and sang and cheered before they left. 
I lundreds of flags were waved by the crowd in the street which, con- 
sidering the short warning, was very large. The trucks formed a 
column on Main st in front of the Armory and were quickly load- 
ed. About 9 a. m. the column moved away followed by the 
cheers of the townspeople who had come to see the company de- 
part. From that day to April 29, 1919, when most of the boys 
received their discharges — over two years — the Richardson Light 
Guard was destined to plav an important part in the history of 
the World War. 

As was the case of Company A in the Spanish War, so it was 
in the World War, every Company A man, a Volunteer, offering 
his services to his government, regardless of what the future was 
to bring forth, and it can be said with pride that the boys lived up 
to tradition of the old Richardson Light Guard and in their ser- 
vice reflected credit to their town, state and country. 

The drill regulations state that "Success in battle is the ulti- 
mate object of all military training; success may be looked for 
•only when the training is intelligent and thorough. The excel- 
lence of an organization is judged by its field efficiency." 

From the time of call to service to the time when the men first 
went into the lines, officers and men did their best to have Com- 
pany A carry out the aims expressed so concisely in the foregoing 
paragraph. 

April 7. The day was rainy and cold as the trucks passed 
through Quincy, Nantasket, and Hull to Fort Revere which was 
reached about 1.30 p. m. Capt. Connelly reported to Capt. Long 
in command of the fort who assigned quarters for the men in a 
■storehouse and a building used as a gymnasium. Securing a 
range the cooks proceeded to prepare a meal while the men cleaned 
out the buildings. Cots were later obtained and connections 
made with the steam plant at the fort so that the buildings were 

115 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

made comfortable. Electric lights were installed. The weather 
was quite cold and stormy for some days, followed by a big snov/ 
storm making it necessary to do considerable shovelling and' 
cleaning around the fort. Capt. Long proved to be a fine gentle- 
man who did everything possible to make things run smoothly and 
to help the officers adjust things to the new conditions. In turn, 
the Company showed their appreciation by their fine conduct at 
the fort. 



A PROGRAM OF TRAINING 

A program of training for the company was immediately put 
in operation and guard duty performed jointly with the men 
stationed at the fort. An important part of the Company's duty 
was the furnishing of guard detachments at the Hingham Water 
Works, Accord Pond Pumping Station, and at the Cable Station 
near the water at Hull. This cable station controlled the wires 
leading to the fire control stations at the various forts.' Any in- 
jury to these cables would put the fire control apparatus out of 
working order and cause a serious situation. Likewise, cutting 
off the water supply would cause serious trouble in handling the 
big gun batteries, and general discomfort. As the distance to 
the outer posts was from 12 to 16 miles, the groups remained ort 
duty a certain number of days on each relief, being visited and 
inspected by the officers in motorcycle side car. 

Calisthenics, close order drill, sighting and aiming exercises^ 
22-calibre rifle practise, bayonet exercises, extended order drills^ 
range practise, advance guard work, schools and inspections, to- 
gether with the regular guard duty made a busy routine for the- 
Company. Consistent with safety, leaves for a period or hours 
were granted to the men, and entertainments and sports arranged 
for their enjoyment. Later, on orders, trenches were dug at strate- 
gic points to guard against landing parties, and tests made without 
any previous warning, by a call to arms on the bugle, to see if 
the company was efficient. Needless to say the harbor officers- 
were astonished at the speed, precision, and intelligence displaved 
by the Company at these tests. 

Frequent visits to the fort by relatives and friends helped to 
break the monotony of drill. The arrival of the case filled with 
gifts of useful articles, fruit, candy, etc., sent by the Lady Asso- 
ciates of Company A at regular intervals was always a source for 
great rejoicing. 

116 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

CO. A LADY ASSOCIATES FORM 

April II. This organization was formed on this date at the 
Armory and was composed of mothers, wives, sisters, sweethearts, 
lady relatives, and friends of the boys. Its main object to have 
an organization through which families and friends could send 
gifts and comfort to the Company. The officers were Mrs. Kath- 
ryn I. Connelly, president; Mrs. Fred H. Rogers, treasurer; Miss 
Marjorie D. Hawkes, secretary. The organization functioned^ 
separately from the Public Safety Committee and continued until 
the Company A boys returned home. It was a wonderful or- 
ganization and it will always be remembered by the boys. 

Several of the fraternal organizations and Spanish War Vet- 
erans at various times sent comfort boxes to the members of their 
lodges. The Wakefield Aerie of Eagles presented the Company 
with a chest of first aid materials, splints, bandages, and medicines 
in convenient tablet form with directions for use. This chest was- 
prepared by Dr. Woodbury and was very complete. It proved 
its worth in several em.ergencies when the Regimental Hospital 
was short of medical supplies and was used by the Regimental 
Surgeons. Capt. Connelly on leaving the company at Westfield 
left directions for it to be returned as an order had been issued 
prohibiting any medicines to be distributed except by the Regi- 
mental Surgeons. 

LOSSES BY DISCHARGE 

During the month the Company lost several of its members. 
Sgts. Murray and Evans were discharged April 23 by order of 
government to resume their respective occupations — ammunition 
plant at Lowell and plant making submarine valves respectively — 
and the following men were discharged because of dependents at 
home: Privates Charles Doucette, A. B. Cayting, Howard W. 
Griffith, also Private John White, transferred to Company H. 
These places were filled later by new recruits from Wakefield. 
Losses during May by discharge for dependents. Private 1st Class 
Foster, May 16. 

May. On recommendation of Capt. Connelly, Sgt. J. E. 
Creedon and Sgt. E. E. Hickey were sent to Officers' Training 
School at Plattsburg, N. Y., on May 12 and May 14, respectively. 
Both of these efllcient "non-coms" successfully passed the examina- 
tions and later were commissioned second Lieutenants. Corp. G. 
L. Dillaway passed the examinations for West Point and left the 
company. Capt. Long, who had been in command at the fort, 
was transferred and promoted, his place being taken by a former 

117 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

National Guard officer, Capt. Walker, who at one time was lieu- 
tenant in Company H of Stoneham and known to the Wakefield 
officers. Though a strict disciplinarian he was very helpful to 
the officers and men of Company A who had been rivals in earlier 
days. He praised the company highly for their fine conduct and 
the general neatness at inspections. 

While at the fort the company had several medical inspections 
and were vaccinated for small pox and also inocculated again 
against typhoid and para-typhoid, making them, as it proved, im- 
mune to those diseases. So much confidence was placed in Com- 
pany A and its officers that the Regimental Officers visited the 
company but rarely, each time highly complimenting the men on 
their appearance and cleanliness of quarters and on the nice re- 
ports of the Fort's officers. 

ORDERS TO RECRUIT TO 150 MEN 

Saturday, May 19. Capt. Connelly received orders from 6th 
Regiment Headquarters to recruit company from 100 to 150 en- 
listed men and on Sunday, May 20, sent Lieut. Rogers with Corp. 
Edward F. Better and Priv. Gray B. Brockbank as assistants to 
take charge of the recruiting at the Armory. Recruiting age was 
from 18 to 35. 

Owing to their new duties both Col. Sweetser and Capt. Con- 
nelly who were members of the State Examining Board for officers 
^ere relieved from this service. Having obtained permission 
from Col. Sweetser and the commander at the fort, Capt. Connelly 
brought a detachment of six squads to act as escort in the usual 
Memorial Day exercises of Post 12, G. A. R., Wednesday, May 30, 
returning to the fort directly after the exercises, being accompa- 
nied to the station bv the band — a suggestion of Selectman John 
A. Meloney. 

RECRUITS LEAVE FOR CAMP DARLING 

June. Fifty-four recruits were passed and left Sunday, June 
3, under Lieut. Rogers for Camp Darling, South Framingham, 
where they arrived and made camp in a rainstorm. Later Capt. 
Connelly detailed Cook Hubbard, Supply Sgt. Davis, Sgts. Stone, 
Eastman, Corporals Fish, Burrage, Heustis and Edgar to assist 
Lieut. Rogers with the recruit company. On June 29 Lieut. 
Hawkes, who had been on duty with the 16th U. S. Infantry at 
the Mexican Border, returned to Camp Darling and joined with 
Lieut. Rogers in instructing the recruits. Since Lieut. Rogers left 
the fort in May, Capt. Connelly was the only officer with the com- 
pany there. 

118 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Losses this month — Corp. James W. Findlay, June 24, 1917,. 
for dependents. 

NEW MEN TO MAKE 150, CO. A 



Bishop, Harry W. 
Burns. John F. 
Caytlng, Heywood C. 
Collins, James 
Coombs, Carl L. 
Crocker. Donald G. 
Devlin, Charles M. 
Devoe, William 
Donegan, John P. 
Doucette, John M. 
Dubois, Victor A. 
Duggan, John P. 
Dulong. Frank K. 
Edwards. Fayette R. 
Fan, Winiam L. 
Ferrick, James F. 
Gammons, Frank W. 
Gerard, Stanley R. 
Gibbons, John C. 
Goodwin, Albert C. 
Greenleaf, Harold H. 
Hanright, Thomas E. 
Hatfield, George E. 
Hobbv, Harry R. 
Holt, Arthur R. 
Hurton, .Tames F. 
Lane, Thomas .T. 
Latham, Edward C. 
Lenners, Eugene J. 
Malonson, Frank J. 



Burns, William F. 



Philbrick, William A. 
McGrath, John C. 
McKenney, Frank L. 
McKenna, Robert 
;McMahon, .John B. 
McMaster. Henry 
McWhinnie, Ernest .J. 
^McWhinnie, Percy 
Neiss, Archie J. 
Oldfield, John W. 
O'Neill, James D. 
Palumbo, John 
Preston, .Tames A. 
Reissle. Frederick L. 
Rhodes, Winiam L. 
Robertson, Herbert L. 
Seabury, Frank .T. 
Seabury. James S. 
Seaman, Frank T. 
Singer, Norman C. 
Stone, Roy P. 
Vallard, Wilfred A. 
Weaver, Percy R. 
Wheeler. Sylvanus K. 
Young, Percy 

Enlisted But Discharged 

Martin, J. Edward 
Morse, Frederick A. 



Reservists who reported July 36 

Doucette, John A. 



During the tour of duty at the fort only one serious accident 
occurred. Private Nutile accidently shot himself in the foot 
while at Accord Pond. A number of promotions were made 
which appear in roster. Orders were received for regiment to mo- 
bilize at Camp Darling on June 30, but the harbor authorities de- 
sired the company left on duty at Fort Revere so the orders were 
rescinded. New orders came July 5 to report at Camp Darling 
and the company at once made preparations — cleaning up quar- 
ters, packing, and weighing baggage and loading same on car. 

July 6. Company A left Fort Revere after final inspection 
and marched to railroad station at Hull at 12 o'clock and en- 
trained for South Framingham via New York and New Haven, 
R. R. Before leaving, Capt. Walker complimented the company 
very highly on their work, conduct, and discipline and the excel- 
lent care of quarters and equipment, and told Capt. Connelly 
that Company A was the best National Guard Company with- 
which he had ever come in contact. This bore out the judgment 
oi^^ Col. Sweetser in selecting Company A for this duty with regulai 
troops. 



119 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
COMPANY A ARRIVES AT SOUTH FRAMINGHAM 

July 6-21, 1917. Arriving at South Framingham siding at 
2.35 p. m., the Company marched to Camp Darling, creating a 
fine impression by their soldierly appearance. The company was 
re-assembled and Capt. Connelly took over the command of the 
recruits. Lieut. Rogers and non-coms, had trained the recruits 
exceptionally well, carrying on as a separate company so that 
when the recruit company was combined with the older men, 
Company A proceeded v/ith their training as a unit. Camp 
Darling was pleasantly situated at some distance from the old 
camp grounds occupied by the 9th Regiment, which later became 
the 101st Infantry. Under Col. Sweetser the 6th Regiment com- 
menced a strenuous training program with very strict discipline 
which soon proved results, welding together as fine a body of in- 
telligent citizen soldiers and oflicer personnel as could be found 
anywhere in the United States and highly efficient. 

THE MARCH TO CAMP DEVENS, AVER 

July 21. The Regiment being ordered to Camp Devens at 
Ayer, camp was broken and a three-day march commenced on this 
■date. New camp was m.ade that day at Sudbury, shelter tents 
being used. Sunday, July 22, the Regiment continued on to Box- 
boro at 8 a. m., arriving and making camp at 2.30 p. m., the men 
in good condition. Monday, July 23, the Regiment left Boxboro 
at 8.30 a. m. and marched to Camp Devens, Ayer, going into camp 
at 4 p. m. after a very hard day. The heat for three days was 
very oppressive, temperature ranging from 95 to 110 degrees, and 
with the dust made marching conditions with full equipment very 
trying. Company A was the only company in the entire regiment 
to come through each day's march with every man present, show- 
ing the stufi" the men were made of and their excellent physical 
condition due to good training and discipline. 

On the second day's march, at Maynard, the townspeople 
turned out to welcome the regiment and provided trucks with ton- 
ics and refreshments for the boys. Once again on these marches 
Company A was fortunate in having the truck, as camp baggage, 
including cooking ranges and utensils, could be sent ahead of the 
column, tents set up and meals prepared before the regiment ap- 
peared, which added to the comfort of the men after each hot 
day's march. At Camp Devens the 6th Regiment Camp was 
located near the main road to Shirley. Large tents were set up, 
■company streets re-arranged, incinerators built, cooking facilities 

120 



k^% 



is 




2 o ^ 

g g ? 



c+ ^ r" 
£1 S 



g s ^ 



'^^ 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

improved, long mess tables built, and preparations made for a 
supposedly long stay. 

Camp Devens at the time was in process of construction and 
a very busy place. The camp when completed was seven miles 
by two miles, area 8960 acres, number of buildings 1400; road laid 
20 miles; electric wiring 400 miles, heating pipes 60 miles, shower 
baths 2200, capacity estimated at 43,000 men, maximum men em- 
ployed 9176. 

In addition to the usual training program, general guard duty 
was performed around the whole camp including special guards 
during days when the civilian workers were being paid. Con- 
siderable attention was given to bayonet attack, extended order 
drill, arm and flag signalling. Lectures by foreign officers were 
given on the war. 

On August 5, the regiment, although in the United States Ser- 
vice, in conformity with the new laws, was "inducted" into service 
and became a part of one great United States Army. On August 
14, Sergt. Hickey and Sergt. Creedon were discharged at Platts- 
burg to become 2nd lieutenants attached to the new 76th National 
Army Division at Camp Devens being formed. The company 
was glad to greet them on their arrival at Devens and received the 
benefit of the knowledge obtained at Plattsburg. 

DISTURBING RUMORS 

Early in August various rumors were afloat concerning 
changes to take place in the regiment. These caused considerable 
worry to officers and men who had worked hard and faithfully 
giving their best in making the regiment a wonderful organiza- 
tion and building up a fine morale which now seemed threatened. 

Aug. 13. These disturbing rumors finally became facts on 
the receipt of a telegram by General Edwards, Aug. 13, 1917, at 
the headquarters of the Northeastern Department, Boston, order- 
ing the formation of the 26th Division. Immediately a sadness 
fell upon the regiment as it became known that the regiment in 
common with the 5th and 8th was to be broken up and combined 
with other regiments to make war strength units. A let-down of 
morale was noticeable and much bitterness felt that so fine a regi- 
ment should be sacrificed. Officers who had worked hard with 
their companies were almost in tears at the thought of breaking 
up, and friends of the soldiers not knowing the circumstances, be- 
came bitter also at what was considered an injustice. It was 
thought for a time that the Regiment would become a permanent 
•depot brigade to furnish replacements to the Division, and cap- 

122 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

tains clung to the forlorn hope that most of their organ izations- 
v/ould be preserved. 

Aug. 23. Realizing that a separation must finally result, 
Capt. Connelly obtained permission to take the company to Wake- 
field, Aug. 25th, for a farewell visit before the dreaded changes 
occurred. 

LIEUT. HAWKES FIRST R. L. G. MEMBER TO GO 
TO FRANCE 

On Aug. 23, 1917, Lieut. Edgar B. Hawkes was detached and 
assigned to Train Headquarters and Military Police of the 26th 
Division and left for France with an advance group of officers to 
make arrangements for billeting of the Division. Thus the- 
Richardson Light Guard had an important part in the early his- 
tory of the American Expeditionary Forces in France. 

At a special meeting of the Public Safety Committee at the 
State Armory, committees were appointed for a complimentary rC'- 
ception and send-oflF to Company A, 6th Regiment, Richardson 
Light Guard. Chairman Charles E. Walton presided and com- 
mittees were appointed. It was proposed to give the boys a ban- 
quet, but on suggestion of Capt. Connell}', who thought the men 
should have as much time as possible with their friends and fam- 
ilies, it was decided to have an informal afi'air at the Armory and 
a dance. 

Aug. 25. Company A left Ayer at 2.17 p. m., reached Boston 
at 3.40 o'clock, arrived at Wakefield Center at 4.52. A big crowd 
and committee greeted the company at the station. The com- 
pany marched up Main st in column of squads to the Rockery and 
back to the Armory in column of platoons, making a very fine ap- 
pearance. After placing their equipment in the Armory, the com- 
pany was dismissed until evening. The transportation expenses 
of the company were paid by the Public Safety Committee. 



123 



CHAPTER TEN 

THE FAREWELL RECEPTION TO COMPANY A, 
AUG. 25 AND 26, 1917 

A reception was held at the Armory from 7.30 to 8.30 p. m., 
after which Rev. Florence J. Halloran of St. Joseph's Church gave 
a brief address of welcome to the company. Dancing was then 
enjoyed by those who stayed, refreshments being served by the 
Lady Associates of Company A until the close at 1 1.30. 




Co. A Leaving for Camp Devens, Aug. 26, 1917. Home for Farewell 



A complete roster of the war company will be found at the 
end of this history. 

The company assembled at 10.30 a. m., Sunday, for the final 
parting. A touching farewell address was given by Father 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Halloran at the Armory. Main street was crowded with the 
townspeople to give the boys a "good send off" as the company 
■escorted by the committee, State Guard Company, Post 12, G. A. 
R., Camp 39, U. S. W. V., and Boy Scouts paraded to the Upper 
Station to take the train. This farewell visit and reception will 
long be remembered by the men of Company A who soon after 
were to be sent to the battlefields of France. 



TRANSFERS TAKE PLACE 

During the next few days the dreaded breaking up of the 
Regiment took place, orders following rapidly. Lieut. Rogers 
was transferred to Company M, 6th Regiment, and shortly after 
detached and sent to Camp Bartlett, Westfield, as assistant to the 
Camp Quartermaster whose duties were multiplying. First 
Lieutenant Frank R. Flanders of Company M, 6th Regiment, had 
been assigned to Company A, but was transferred to the 104th 
and left with that detachment August 28. The following trans- 
fers took place: 

Private Carl 1. Cheever to the Headquarters Company and 
k'ter to the Train Headquarters, 26th Division. 



COMPANY A MEN TRANSFERRED TO 101st MILITARY 
POLICE, AUG. 29, 1917 



Cook Gibbons, John C. 

Harlow, Melburn N. Goodwin, Albert C. 

Bugler Greenleaf. Harold H. 

Galvin, Daniel H. Hobby, Harry R. 

PriTates, First Class Holt, Arthur R. 

Harper, Robert E. Loughlin, Patrick E. 

Lawlor, Frank E. McWhinnie, Ernest J. 

Walsh, Thomas F. McWhinnie, Percy C. 

Privates McKenna, Robert B. 

Blanchard, Leon A. McKenney, Frank L. 

Byrnes, Fred H. Mortimer, Harold E. 

■Champagne, Frank L. Preston, James A. 

Devlin. Charles M. Robertson, Herbert L. 

Doucette. John M. Weaver, Percy R. 

Dulong, Frank R. Williams, George B. 

Fairbanks, Ernest E. Wheeler, Sylvanus K. 
•Gammons, Frank W. 

Cook Harlow was later transferred to Engineer Train and 
Bugler Galvin transferred back to Company A. 



125 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

FIFTY COMPANY A MEN TRANSFERRED TO 104TH 
INFANTRY, AUGUST 28, 1917 



Sergreants 
Eastman, Ernest R. 
Brown, James G. 
Better, Edward F., Jr. 
Burrage, George A. 

Corporals 
Walsh, Arthur T. 
Fish, Crowell G. 
Brockbank, John C. 
Edgar, Brent M. 
Heustis, George B. 
Little, Cyrus A. 
Brockbank, Gray B. 
Goodridge, Carl W. 
Comey, Francis W. 
Nelson, Harry E. 
Eaton, Nathan W., Jr. 
Wenzel, William L. 
Stone, Otis L. 

Mechanic 
Seabury, William D. 

Private, 1st Class 
Beeler, Cornelius H. 

Privates 
Bishop, Harry W. 
Cayting, Hayward C. 
Collins, James 
Coombs, Carl L. 



Cummings. Timothy E. 
Devoe, VV^illiam 
Donegan, John P. 
Duggan, John P. 
Edwards, Fayette R. 
Ferrick, James F. 
Forrest, William M. 
Fraughton, George P. 
Gerard. Stanley R. 
Hanright, Thomas B. 
Hatfield, George E. 
Hurton, James F. 
Malonson, Frank J. 
Melonson, Fred P. 
Mellon, Ernest E. 
McGrath, John F. 
McLaughlin, Andrew P. 
Neiss, Archie J. 
O'Neill, James D. 
Palumbo, John 
Rhodes, William H. 
Reebenaeker, Edward K. 
Reissle, Frederick L. 
Seabury, Frank J. 
Seabury, James S. 
Singer, Norman C. 
Stone, Roy P. 



Of these Corporals Edgar, Goodridge and Stone went to Com- 
pany K and Corporals Heustis, Little, Comey, Eaton and Nelson 
to Company G. All the other men were assigned to Company A. 

August 30. Transferred to 101st Engineer Train. 



Corporal 

Beebe, John H., Jr. 

Mechanic 

Williams, Alexander G. 



Private 

Doucette, Jeremiah W., Jr. 



Sept. 1. On new physical examination Company A lost two 
more good soldiers, Privates Robert L. Singer and William H. 
Sullivan. 

Capt. Connelly was very pleasantly surprised on being pre- 
sented with a very fine pair of field glasses by the members of the 
company, Sergeant Stone making the presentation for the com- 
mittee. The Captain responded feelingly, thanking the men for 
their regard and regretting the changes being ordered to take place. 

Sept. 3. On Monday, Sept. 3, another transfer of men took 
place, fifteen privates to 102nd Infantry (R. S. O. No. 161), the 
detachment leaving for New Haven, Conn. 



126 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

TRANSFERRED TO 102ND INFANTRY, CAMP YALE, 
NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Privates, First-Class and Privates 

Co. 

1st Class Barry, Augustine C. Supply 

Derby, John W. E 

DeRoche, George B. F 

1st Class Fay, Edward M. D 

Ferrick. Joseph M. E 

Hutchinson, Earl R. Supply 

Jeffrey. Charles F. B 

1st Class Lee. John J. D 

Lucey, Joseph A. E 

1st Class Luken. Roy E. E 

1st Class MeCullough, John W. E 

Mouse, Thomas E. F 

Nutile, Charles C. ? 

Seaman, Frank T. Supply 

Walsh, Patrick F 

THE REGIMENT LEAVES FOR WESTFIELD 

Sept. 4. The regiment, much depleted by this time, was or- 
dered to Camp Bartlett, Westfield, with Lieut.-Col. Damon in com- 
mand. The area at Devens occupied b}^ the regiment was thor- 
oughly cleaned. Those left with the company will remember 
well the method of taking up the long line of large iron pipe which 
supplied the camp with water. Most of the dirt was removed 
from around the pipe and men strung out in line on both sides. 
At a signal on the bugle the men took hold and lifted all the pipe 
from the trench and laid it on the ground nearby, workmen later 
taking the lengths apart. The trench was filled by the soldiers 
who then returned to their duties of preparing for Westfield. 

Entraining at Ayer at 9 a. m. the regiment moved to Westfield 
arriving at the siding near the Camp about 6 p. m. Before the 
train was unloaded an order was issued to immediately transfer 
29 privates to the 101st Infantry in camp at the state grounds, 
Framingham, using the same train in which they already were. 
This was a sad blow as it was hoped at Westfield to again build 
up the company. To the credit of the men transferred, it may be 
said that they accepted the order like true soldiers, although dis- 
appointed at being sent from the company. While making 
preparations the company was detrained and shelter tent camp 
made in the field near the tracks. A light meal was furnished. 
At this time it was quite dark and difficult to unload baggage cars 
as we were without lanterns. The Company truck had been sent 
over the road fromi Ayer and was late in arriving, but on its arrival 
the company records were unpacked and work commenced on 
making out service records for the men going to the lOIst. The 
service records were completed and properly checked late in the 

127 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

evening and the train moved to Framingiiam. In a short time 
after, the 101st started on their journey to France. All of the 
29 men transferred were assigned to the Headquarters Company 
of the 101st Infantry. 

Privates, First-Class — Raymond J. Beane, Joseph F. Behrle, John J. 
Crowley, Arthur L. Dingle, John N. Henningar, Frank E. McCarthy, George B. 
Sargent. Stephen F. Toth. 

Privates — John T. Bannon. John T. Burns, John M. Butler, Donald S. 
Crocker, Victor A. Dubois, William L. Fall, Charles M. Glynn, Albert F. Hale, 
Thomas J. Lane, Edward C. Latham, Eugene F. Lenners, John E. McMahon, 
James P. McNally, Edward J. Melanson, John W. Oldfield, George S. Perkins, 
William A. Philbrick, Calvin 11. Stanley, Wilfred A. Vallard, Roy H. Wright 
and Percy H. Young. 

CO. A AT CAMP BARTLETT, WESTFIELD 

Sept. 5. Early in the morning the regiment marched to its 
position at Camp Bartlett, Westfield, near the spot where Com- 
pany A had camped in 1905 during the mobilization that year. 
The men at once set up the large tents and spent considerable 
time in cleaning the ground of brush and making a fine company 
street. After this was done they had to move to a new spot and 
do the work over again. Later Company A and Company B 
were combined for drill purposes and mess. Surplus property 
was turned in to the supply officer as it was evident that the com- 
pany would not receive any more recruits and that the final blow 
would fall soon. 

THE COMPANY MOVES TO STOREHOUSE IN WESTFIELD 

Capt. Connelly in addition to company duties was assigned to 
Camp Quartermaster. Directed by General Cole to find a suitable 
building for storehouse purposes, the captain searched the city and 
decided on the brick building at 369 Elm street on the river bank. 
This building had two floors available and elevator, and proved to 
be just right for the purpose. During this month the officers in 
charge had been working feverishly to get this 52nd brigade organ- 
ized and equipped, but were handicapped by lack of proper quar- 
ters and supplies. The Northeastern Department at Boston in- 
dorsed the selection of building and ordered Capt. Connelly to 
make necessary contracts, which was done, and quarters taken 
over with the captain in charge of quartermaster's supplies. La- 
ter Lieut. Rogers occupied the upper floor and took charge of ord- 
nance supplies for the brigade. Capt. Connelly was to have 
been furnished a detail to assist, but received permission from 
General Cole to take all that was left of his company to the store- 
house, although most of the men were non-coms. 

Sept. 9. Before the company moved to storehouse in West- 

128 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

field, the)^ gave a supper to the men of Company A who had been 
transferred to Camp Bartlett. This proved to be a very enjoy- 
able and thoughtful event, as it was a long time before the com- 
pany miembers came together again for a reunion. 

Sept. 12. The company moved their baggage in their truck 
and marched to their new home at the storehouse on this date. 









Co. A at Westfield with Company Truck 



They soon established comfortable quarters in a large room 
in the rear of building. Surplus equipment had been coming in 
to Westfield from various camps and was piling up on platforms 
at the railroad station in confusion. Capt. Connelly, using the 
company truck and men, quickly cleaned up the property and 
transported it to the storehouse where it was carefully sorted and 
listed — Lieut. Rogers taking the supplies needed for his depart- 
ment. The government depots were also sending supplies by ex- 
press and under the efficient management of Capt. Connelly and 
Lieut. Rogers things were soon running smoothly and the work 
of equipping the brigade greatly facilitated. Thus Company A 
played a big part in getting the men of the 26th Division ready for 
service in time to become the first National Guard Division to be 

129 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

organized, equipped, and sent to France, despite tne lact that the 
42nd Division was slated to leave before the 26th. 

CAPT. CONNELLY TRANSFERRED 

A few days later Capt. Connelly received an order transfer- 
ring him to the 103rd Infantry, which was immediately rescinded. 
On September 19 he again received Special Order 25, Headquar- 
ters, 26th Division, Boston, transferring him to the 104th Infantry, 
but ordering him to remain at storehouse until further notice. 
This order was sent by telegraph. On Thursday, Sept. 27, he 
was assigned to command of Com.pany G, 104th Infantry, but or- 
dered to remain at storehouse until Sept. 30. On this date the 
captain turned over the property to Capt. Thomas W. Doyle of 
Company G, 6th Regiment, who was that day- assigned to com- 
mand the small detachment of Company A. 

Sept. 30. Bidding farewell to the faithful few who were left 
of this remarkable Company A, for which he had worked so hard 
to build up, the captain sorrowfully returned to the camp grounds 
and took charge of his new command. It required considerable 
energy to equip them and whip them into shape as they had been 
without a captain for two weeks. Five corporals of Company 
A had been transferred to this Company which was destined to 
see some rough action later m France. 

The remaining members of Company A at the storehouse were 
on duty until late in October when they again returned to Camp 
Bartlett and joined the regiment. Capt. Doyle was transferred 
shortly after coming to the storehouse, and in his place came 
Capt. Lucke of Worcester, who had commanded Company A in 
the Old 2nd Regiment. He was finally discharged for physical 
reasons and his place taken by Capt. Sullivan. The following 
men made up the company at this time, Sergt. Baxter having re- 
ported back after a sojourn in the hospital for a broken arm re- 
ceived while at Camp Devens; Private J. A. Doucette and James 
F. Hurton discharged for physical reasons; Private Holoway had 
been transferred to the Truck Company, 101st Ammunition train: 

Supply Sgt. Davis Corp. Wiclell 

Mess Sgt. Fiiidlay Cook Hubbard 

Sgt. Burns Cook Buckley 

Sgt. Stone Mechanic McMaster 

Sgt. Thompson Bugler Marchetti 

Sgt. Quinn Bugler Galvin 

Corp. Holden Private W. Burns 

Corp. Corcoran Private Gersinovitch 
Corp. Creedon 

The Sixth Regiment left Camp Bartlett in November for 
Camp Greene, Charlotte, S. C, under Lieut. -Col. Damon and 
afterward lost the old regimental designation, becoming a part of 
the 4th Regular Pioneers. The camp, although in the South, 

130 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

proved to be a cold place and the men passed through a disagree- 
able Winter. 




^ 9' -^ 




Camp Green, Charlotte, N. C, 1918 



COMPANY A IN THE SOUTHERN CAMPS 
The company remained at Camp Green until February en- 
gaged in routine camp details. Early in the month another move 
was made to Camp Wadsworth, Spartenburg, where the company 
spent the Summer until August. Here a number of promotions 
took place. Sergeants Davis and Thompson were commissioned 
Second Lieutenants and Sergeant Quinn sent to Officers' School at 
Camp Gordon. Corporals Corcoran and Widell were made ser- 
geants. Corp. Creedon was transferred to the 1st Anti Aircraft 
Battalion and left for France. During this time the company lost 
its old designation of Company A, 6th Massachusetts Infantry, 
and became a part of the 4th Pioneer Regiment in which Lieut. 
Davis was assigned to the Supply Company and Lieut. Thompson 
to Company A. Private William Burns and Bugler Marchetti were 
transferred to headquarters company. Sergt. Quinn was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant later. Cpl. Manson M. Dillaway left 
for aviation training field afterward being commissioned 2nd Lieu- 
tenant. Lt. Edward E. Hickey while at Camp Devens, assigned 
t-o Headquarters, supervised construction on the large cantonment 
r"fle range costing |100,000. Later, in France, as Divisional 
Range Officer, he assisted in construction of three rifle Ranges in 
the 76th Division area. 

131 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 




aVV-V 



V-, V 



" 1\:J.^\X l'^ ^' 



I I I 



Camp Green, Charlotte, N. C, 1918 



THE 4TH PIONEERS LEAVE FOR FRANCE 

Late in August the 4th Pioneers entrained for Newport News, 
remaining there for two weeks when they finally embarked for 
France. At last, after weary months of waiting and trying every 
means to get across, the Richardson Light Guard finally realized 
their wish — that of taking part in the final struggle in France. 
Although not all had the opportunity of going to the front, still 
each had his part to play in the conflict. For every man in the 
fighting units it is estimated that three men were needed behind 
the lines in the services of supply, administration, etc. All the 
original company (with the exception of Lieut. Quinn, remained in 
the South; Lieut. Creedon, kept at Cam.p Devens; Cadet G. L. 
Dillaway at West Point; and Lieut. Manson Dillaway at aviation 
field in the South) reached France before the war ended. 

During the trip across, influenza spread among the men, re- 
sulting in the death of Cook Buckley while on the boat. He was 
buried at St. Nazaire, France. 

When the regiment arrived at St. Nazaire, France, it was sent 
to Le Mans where it was broken up and scattered as replacements 

132 



HisiuRY Of Richardson Light Guard 

to various units. Lieut. Davis reached the 32nd Division, 
Lieut. Thompson was detailed on billeting work, Sergt. Stone sent 
to Bordeaux, Sergt. Corcoran to Prisoner-of-War Company, St. 
Nazaire; Sergt. Baxter to Le Mans, Sergt. Widell to Central 
Records Office in Bourges and Chaumont, Mechanic McMaster to 
Le Mans, Cook Hubbard to Le Mans, Sergt. Calvin to 330th Reg- 
iment, 83rd Division; Sergt. Marchetti to Rifle Range, Monces; 
Private Burns and Gersinovitch remained at headquarters in Le 
Mans, Corp. Creedon was fortunate enough to get over in time to 
see active service with Anti-.A.ircraft Battalion in the Aisne-Marne, 
St. Mihiel, and Meurthe-Mosselle fronts. He was promoted to 
sergeant and later made battalion-sergeant-major. Sergt. Find- 
lay was made regimental-sergeant-major in Le Mans area, 83rd 
Div. 




Pistols Used in World War 

.45 & .38 double-action 6-shot revolver 
.45-eal., Colt Automatic 7-shot 



133 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

EQUIPMENT OF SOLDIERS 

When first called out the soldiers wore the olive drab wool 
blouse and breeches, russet shoes, canvas puttees, campaign hat, 
and O. D. overcoat. Rifle was U. S. Magazine model 1903 with 
knife bayonet. A web cartridge belt (with suspenders) from 
which hung the haversack, canteen, first-aid pouch, bayonet scab- 
bard, and intrenching tools completed the ordnance equipment. 
One heavy O. D. blanket or tv^'o light-weight blankets, poncho, 
extra underwear, shoes and toilet kit were made in collar roll, 
shelter tent v/as on the outside. 

At Camp Devens the collar roll was discarded for the new 
pack equipment — a cut of which appears. This pack complete 
consisted of a haversack and pack currier to which the pack was 
attached in either long or short roll, the whole carried high on the 
back with supporting straps around the shoulders. The cartridge 
belt was supported by suspenders attached to the pack straps. 
The canteen, first aid pouch, and wire cutters were hung on the 
cartridge belt. The intrenching tool was attached to haversack. 
Bayonet scabbard hung from belt or was attached to haversack. 
Above the haversack was the meat can pouch containing meat can 
and cover enclosing knife, fork and spoon, condiment can was 
carried in haversack. The poncho gave way to the O. D. raincoat 
which, in many cases, was not waterproof. The blankets and 
extra articles v/ere rolled with shelter tent half and placed in the 
pack carrier. The intrenching tools were a wire cutter, small 
shovel, a pick-mattock, and a hand ax. These were distributed 
in each squad in proper proportions, each man carrying a tool. 
Overcoats and rain coats when not worn, were carried in horseshoe 
roll over pack. 



R. L. G. Non-Commissioned Officers Promoted to Commissioned 
Officers During the World War 

Cpl. Mansoii M. Dillaway, commissioned 2nd Lt. Aviation Sec- 
tion; 1st Sgt. James G. Brown, commissioned 2nd Lt. Lif., as- 
signed 126th Inf.; Sgt. Edward E. Hiekey, graduated Plattsburg 
School (Officers), commissioned 2nd Lt. Inf., promoted 1st Lt. ; 
Sgt. Jeremiah E. Creedon, graduated Plattsburg Officers' School, 
commissioned 2nd Lt. Inf., promoted 1st Lt. ; Sgt. Thomas J. 
Quinn, graduated 4th Officers' Training School, commissioned 
.2nd Lt. Inf.; Sgt. Harold F. Davis, commissioned 2nd Lt. Inf.; 
Cpl. G. Lincoln Dillaway, Cadet, West Point, graduated and 
commissioned 2nd Lt., promoted 1st Lt. ;Cpl. Gray B. Brock- 
bank, graduated Army Candidates' School, Prance, and com- 
missioned 2nd Lt. Inf. Officers' Eeserve Corps. 
Note: — Sgt. Clarence A. Thompson, commissioned 2nd Lt. Inf. 
No photo could be obtained so does not appear in group. 

135 



History Of Richardson Light Guard- 

NEW EQUIPMENT IN FRANCE 

Conditions in trench warfare required knowledge of new 
arms. Heretofore the rifle and bayonet were the principal wea- 
pons. Now came the newer weapons — trench mortars, 37 m. m. 
guns, automatic chauchat rifle, hand grenades, rifle grenades, all 
of which the "dough boy" had to have knowledge. Trench knives, 
and Bolos were also added. 




Equipiiu 111 of Sdlditr When 
Called to Service 



Russet shoes gave way to the heavy hob-nailed field shoes, 
canvas puttees to the wool wrapped puttees, campaign hats to the 
steel trench helmet and wool overseas hat. French gas masks 
were added and then the English Box Respirator mask. After 
a time the French mask was discarded and dependence placed 
wholly on the box respirator. The cartridge belt had 10 pockets, 
each containing two clips of five cartridges, having a total of 100^ 
rounds. When going into action, the soldier was given one or 
two bandolers of ammunition, each of sixty rounds, in addition to 
that in his belt. The auto-rifle men or team had considerable ex- 
tra weight to carry in the ammunition for those weapons. 



136 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

COMPOSITION OF A DIVISION 

On the return of Army officers sent to France to study con- 
'ditions, tentative tables of organizations, were hastily prepared as 
a basis for the new divisions to work on. A rifle company which 
had been 150 men was now 250, a battalion 1,000, and an infantry 
regiment about 3700 consisting of twelve rifle companies, a head- 
quarters company, a machine gun company, and a supply com- 
pany. A headquarters company like the 101st, to which 29 
Company A boys had been transferred, was divided into five pla- 
toons — ^headquarters, pioneers, signal, 37 m. m. gun, sappers and 
bombers (stokes motar) — most of the Richardson Light Guard 
boys were in the last three. The boys who had been sent to the 
102nd and 104th were in the rifle companies. A division com- 
prised about 27,000 m.en, divided into two infantry brigades of 
two regiments each, an artillery brigade, engineer regiment, field 
signal battalion, train headquarters, and military police; the 
trains — (ammunition, supplies, sanitary, engineer), three machine 
gun battalions and several smaller units. As a German Division 
numbered about 12,000 in the last year of the war, the size of an 
American division at full strength can be visualized. The neces- 
sary vehicles for a company comprised a rolling kitchen, a ration 
and baggage wagon, a ration cart, a combat wagon which carried 
ammunition, and a water cart. These required fifteen mules, 
which were furnished by the Supply Company as were also the dri- 
vers. 

To assemble and equip this large body of men in such a short 
time required a tremendous amount of energy, but was finally 
accomplished and the 26th had the distinction of being the first 
division to go to France completely equipped as such — the Regu- 
lar Army, 1st Division, although in France was not complete. 
Thus, the 26th, a New England National Guard Division, was 
numbered among the first 50,000 American troops to be sent and 
this, of course, included the Richardson Light Guard. It will be 
remembered that a tremendous effort had been made to send the 
42nd Division ahead of the 26th, as this division which was made 
up of units from various parts of the United States and officered in 
a large part by Regular Army officers, was to have had the honor. 

LEAVING FOR FRANCE 

The story of the Richardson Light Guard must necessarily be 
.a part of that of the Yankee Division as nearly all of the 1 50 Com- 
pany A members had been transferred to it. The 101st and 
102nd became the 51st Brigade and the 103rd and 104th the 52nd 

137 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Brigade. Units of the 101st, which had assembled at the old 
camp grounds in Framingham left about September 7, 1917, sail- 
ing direct from New York on the Mallory Line boats and landing 
at St. Nazaire, France, Sept. 21, 1917. The 102nd Regiment at 
Camp Yale, New Haven, left New York about Sept. 19, arriving 
about October 9, 1917. The 104th Infantry and 101st Ammuni- 
tion Train left Westfield from Sept. 27 to October 8, arri\'ing in 
France, Oct. 21 to 28. Company A with First Battalion of the 
104th left Montreal on Oct. 10, arriving at Liverpool, spending a 
few days at Borden rest camp and leaving for LeHavre, France, 
from Southampton. 




A Convoy of 104th Going to France October, 1917 



Com^pany G with 2nd Battalion 104th left Westfield Oct. 2 for 
Hoboken where the .Aurania of the Cunard Line was boarded, 
leaving for Halifax, Oct. 3, where convoy was assembled Oct. 5, 
1917. The 101st Ammunition train to which Lieut. Rogers was 
assigned was also on this boat so that Capt. Connelly and the lieu- 
tenant were together again and experienced the delightful sensa- 
tion of "mal-de-mer". Company K, 104th was also on this boat. 



138 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The Aurania, a British boat of good size and quite steady, left 
Halifax with the convoy of ten ships on Oct. 6. 1917, for Liverpool. 
The life and routine on this ship was similar to the others. 
Guard duty, calisthenics, manual of arms, schools and inspections, 
filling in the time with boat drills. Every day on given signals 
the men were required to don life belts, quickly assemble at the life 
boat stations to which they were assigned, and proceed to lower 
boats. In the assignment to these boats some curious things took 
place regarding the number of men for whom preparations were 
made by the ship's officers. Capt. Connelly being "from Missou- 
ri", as the}' say, at once checked up his list and found that the 
ship's officers had given him five life rafts, capacity 25 men each 
b_\' clinging to the ropes, and one boat capacit}' of 60 men, a total 
of 185 for his company of 250, and no provision made for him- 
self. In case the boat was torpedoed this didn't look good to 
the captain, who immediately took steps to vigorously protest with 
the result that a complete check-up and satisfactory adjustment 
was made for all the units. 

At this time the German submarines were sinking ships quite 
successfully and the voyage caused considerable anxiety to all. 
The boys will recall the strict orders regarding lights at night, no 
cigarettes, no matches, not even illuminated wrist watches al- 
lowed worn on deck, port holes closed, lest a submarine spot a light 
and attack. A zigzag course by the convoy used up considerable 
time, but was deemed much safer. The officers and certain 
"non-coms" dined first class. The other men were fed in relays 
in large mess rooms, several companies at a time. For transpor- 
tation in these British boats our government paid England over 
$50,000,000 during the war, although many people believed it 
wasn't costing much. 

THE ARRIVAL IN ENGLAND 

A very welcome sight occurred about two days sail from 
Liverpool when seven British torpedo boat destroyers met the 
convoy and escorted it through the danger zone. The lighthouses 
on the coast of Ireland brought a feeling of security also, indica- 
ting the journey's end on water for a while. At 7 p. m., Wednes- 
day, October 17, the Aurania docked at Liverpool. Landing 
at 1.30 a. m. the following morning in a very heavy rainstorm, the 
men entrained at the docks for the second stage of their journey. 
The small English coaches, with their side-door compartments, 
created at first some little amusement, but the change from the 
boat afforded relief. Baggage was not allowed to be unloaded 

139 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

by the British officers, which decision did not appeal to American' 
troops who had always been schooled to travel with that necessary 
part of any army's equipment. A large unloading detail was left 
behind which did not reach France with the baggage until three 
weeks had elapsed. Had not our Quartermaster Department of 
the Army foreseen the foolishness of such delay and provided 
ahead rations and cooking facilities, the regiments would have 
been put to much discomfort. 

Southampton was reached at 10 a. m. and the Second Bn. of 
the 104th, under command of Captain Connelly, marched to the 
Common in the city where the so-called "Rest Camp" was situ- 
ated. As the column was proceeding, the Richardson Light 
Guard boys of Co. G saw and spoke to Williams and Beebe who, 
with the engineers were marching in an opposite direction to the 
boat on which they were going to leave for France. At the "rest 
camp" difficulties were encountered; no one in authority seemed 
to be able to indicate a place and no one at the camp knew about 
rationing the men. Without waiting further, Capt. Connelly as- 
signed tents to the various companies and started a search for ra- 
tions and a place to cook. Here again difficulties arose. The 
English were using clay ovens, while the Americans were used to 
field ranges — another good reason why camp equipment should 
travel with troops. 

No utensils were found so a detail was rushed to the city tO' 
buy what necessary articles could be procured. In the mean- 
time, an English non-com, in charge of the camp, ordered a change 
of location, but Capt. Connelly, v/ho was in command, refused as 
the companies were all settled. In this he was backed up by the 
Major, who had rejoined the Battalion after the work had been 
done. Two meals a day were finally arranged on British rations 
while at Southampton, which was not to the liking of the Amer- 
ican soldiers accustomed to three meals. Bacon, bread, tea, jam, 
stew, and some cheese constituted the meals; bacon in the morning 
at 9 and beef stew in the afternoon at 4 o'clock. As the 1000' 
men of the battalion were fed at one place, it required some pa- 
tience and ingenuity to accomplish the job. 

Owing to air raids no lights were allowed to be seen outside, 
so that at night the city presented a very uninviting appearance. 
At the camp the Americans fraternized with soldiers from Can- 
ada, Australia and New Zealand, and found them good fellows. 
After a few days the Channel boats were made ready and the 
troops embarked for Le Havre, France, arriving without having 
met any submarines. From the pier the troops marched to an- 
other rest camp, several miles away and on top of a high hilL 

140 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Here a cold, uncomfortable night was spent. The following day 
the troops entrained at LeHavre on the famous "40 Hommes et 
8 Chevaux" side-door "Pullmans", small freight cars into each of 
which 35 men with full equipment were packed for a most dis- 
agreeable trip across France. 




Neufchateau, Division Hdqtrs. during training 



AT THE TRAINING AREA IN FRANCE 
The weather at this tim.e \\'as cold and rainy, giving the sol- 
diers a much different impression of Sunny France than they 
had pictured. \'iewed from the narrow doors of freight cars, 
the country did not appeal very strongly to the "Dough Boys". 
However, this condition was accepted in the philosophical manner 
of the American soldier — he was in France and was going to take 
it as it came. Neufchateau in the Vosges, which was to be the 
Division's headquarters, was reached the second day and villages 
assigned for billeting. T'roop trains were shunted to nearest cen- 
ters, troops detrained and marched to their new homes over muddy 
roads. 

For the 101st Infantry the villages of Rouceux, Circourt, Vil- 
lers, Brechamcourt, Rebeuville, and part of Neufchateau were des- 
ignated. Landreville, Certilleux, Rouvres and LaChetine were 
occupied by the 102nd Infantry. 

141 



Noncourt Trenches 
Training Area Near Neufchateau 
Explanation of NonCourt Trench System 

Use Eeading Glass 

The words "Sous Seeteur de Noncourt" are at 
top of map (North) arrow in upper right-hand 
corner. Map scale 1 : 5000 photographed to size 
of cut. 

Trenches are located between the two roads 
which converge toward top of map in direction 
of Neufchateau The road on left is a National 
highway — dots along sides indicate trees which 
are planted at regular intervals along all high- 
ways. The double dotted lines are unimproved 
roads. The thin lines running across the map 
are contour lines five meters apart shoA^ang 
height of ground. 

The first black Avavy line running between the 
two roads is the Support Trench, New Haven. 
Guides conduct the columns from the rear to this 
trench, then forward (toward bottom of map) 
through three Boyaus (Communicating Trenches, 
Washington, Lincoln, Grant), to the next cross 
trenches, Newport and Boston, which are the 
"Cover" and "Fire" trenches respectively. In the 
Cover trenches are some dugouts for shelter. 

Joining these two trenches are several shorter 
Bovaus named Lee, Sheridan, Sherman and Mc- 
Clellan. 

The Regt. P. C. or Command Post and Observa- 
tion Post are to the left of New Haven Trench at 
The Quarry. The Battalion P. C. is located in 
Providence Trench between Boyaus Grant and 
Lincoln. The forAvard Company Command Posts 
are located in Boyau Lincoln near Sheridan and 
in Boyau Washington near Newport Trench. The 
Artillery Observation Post is to left of Newport 
Trench. Each trench is defended by Riflemen, 
Auto Rifle, Bombers and Rifle Grenades. In rear 
of Support Trench are placed the Barrage Ma- 
chine Guns Avhich fire over the trenches to lines 
indicated by black line numbered 41A-42B-43C- 
MD, etc., in front of Boston Trench. In front of 
this line appears a broad black and Avhite line 
numbered 47G-48H-49I, etc., representing the 
enemy's position. 

Directly in rear of NeAvport Trench are Ma- 
chine Guns AA'hich fire across the front trench to 
the ground in front — these are shown by signs 
and arroAV lines. It Avill )je noticed that these 
lines cross giving a fire knoAvn as Inter-locking 
Bands of Fire. 

In ease of attack a signal caused the Bar- 
rage Guns, Avhich Avere sighted at all times, to fires 
immediately on the numbered lines described. 

Raids from the enemy's position Avere practised 
on the Trenches, battalions alternating in Attack 
and Defense. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The 104th Infantry v/as located in Harreville-Les-Chanteurs, 
Sartes, Pompiere, Chartenois, and Giroucourt, most of the Rich- 
ardson Light Guard boys in Harreville and Sartes. 

To Americans used to every convenience, the French billet 
had little to offer as regards comfort. In these little villages the 
houses were of stone, cement and mud, generally built in blocks 
along the main highway with a few very short side streets. Sep- 
arated from the house by only the wall v^'as the barn with one or 
two doors leading into the living rooms. In most cases the room, 
used as the kitchen occupied most of the lower part of the house. 
In the lofts of the barns were quartered the soldiers. Floors in 
most cases were of rough boards, miany of them loose, and the 




A Street in the French Village of Harreville les Chanteurs 

Occupied by 2ncl Bn., 104th Inf., during training period 



roofs were leaky. Access to the loft was by ladder. Owing to 
the danger of fire, lights were strictly prohibited so that at night 
the soldiers' billet was a gloomy place. Below the soldiers' sleep- 
ing quarters were the owners' cattle, horses, hens, pigs, and rab- 
bits — all of which did not add to the purity of the air. Then 
there were rats which scampered around. After some time tiny 
barrack wood stoves were procured which were not of much value 
except for drying wet clothes. With green wood, these stoves pro- 
duced a great deal of smoke, which added to the discomfort of the 
soldiers. 

144 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

During this period tiiere was a great deal of rain, drill fields 
and roads were very muddy, the weather cold. Coming back 
from drill with wet shoes and clothing to a cold billet was a cheer- 
less prospect and many a young man experienced that dreadful 
feeling called homesickness. 

A progressive, thorough course of training was put in force 
by General Headquarters, A. E. F., which included thirty-six 
hours, actual tim.e, each week in close order drill, grenade throw- 
ing, rifle grenade practise, target practise with rifle, auto-rifle in- 
struction, Stokes mortar and 37 m. m. guns, formations for ap- 
proach and attack, and a lot of bayonet fighting. Special men 
were also instructed in signal work, sniping, scouting and patrol- 
ling. Runners were also trained for their duties. A great deal 
of time was spent in training for defense against gas. 

Every man not on special duty or sick was required to drill, 
the program being carried out regardless of the weather condi- 
tions. The training grounds were generally located on a hill at a 
sufficient distance to cause some little marching. In these daily 
marches the m.en were trained to carry the packs to strengthen the 
muscles and prepare them for the work to follow. First, light 
packs were used; then, later on, full equipment on all marches. 
In addition to training duties, the men were used in cleaning up 
the village streets and areas to make conditions as sanitary as 
possible. This was a big job as most of the French inhabitants 
were farmers and kept cattle and horses. The manure so neces- 
S£iry for their land was generally kept in large square piles in 
front of the houses, near the street. This had to be removed de- 
spite the violent protestations of the people. All in all, the sol- 
dier's life was not a happy one. 

The Y. M. C. A. commenced to come into the different vil- 
lages and located in portable huts or some house. Although some 
criticism was made by the soldiers of its business methods, this 
organization did a great deal of good in providing comforts and 
■entertainment before the other welfare organizations had the op- 
portunity to get started. Later the Knights of Columbus, Salva- 
tion Army, Jewish Welfare, and Red Cross did wonderfully well 
considering the limited means at their disposal. 

To prepare for trench warfare a model system of fire, cover, 
and support trenches suitable for a battalion front was constructed 
near Neufchateau. During December and January problems in 
attack and defense were worked out by the battalions in this so- 
called "Noncourt Sector". French officers as instructors imparted 
much valuable information during this work. Here the approved 
.method of conducting a raid was learned. 

145 



CHAPTER ELEVEN 
THE 26th DIVISION MILITARY POLICE 

The Military Police of the Division were selected from the- 
companies of the Sixth Massachusetts Infantry at Camp Devens, 
Aug. 21, 19 1 7, and were organized into two companies, A and B, 
of 150 men each, forming a battalion under command of Major 
W. H. Dolan of the Old Sixth. These men were selected from the- 
tallest in the companies and from those possessing qualities fitting 
them for this new branch of the service. 

This battalion combined with the Division trains was under 
the command of Col. Warren E. Sweetser, the whole being desig- 
nated as the 101st Train Headquarters and Military Police. 
Twenty-nine men from Company A, 6th, were transferred tO' 
Company A of this new unit which later served with great credit 
during the service of the division. ' Company A was commanded: 
by Capt. Arthur N. Payne, the former commander of Company F, 
6th Massachusetts Infantry of Marlboro. Lieut. Edgar B. 
Hawkes was assigned to Company B which was commanded by 
Capt. Michael J. Dee who had commanded Company I of Concord 
of the 6th .Massachusetts Infantry. Special training of a stren- 
uous nature was at once commenced which showed wonderful re- 
sults and produced a body of men not equalled by any division- 
in the A. E. F. When they embarked for France these men were 
the best equipped of any in the division. 

On Aug. 23, 1917, Lieut. Hawkes was detached and sent as- 
one of the advance party of the division to France to make ar- 
rangements for billeting, etc., necessary for the division soon ta- 
cross. The Military Police left Camp Devens September 4, 1917 
for Camp Bartlett, Westfield, where their training was completed. 
On October 8 they entrained for Hoboken, N. J., where they em- 
barked on Oct. 9, 1917, for Halifax, arriving Oct. 1 1 to join convoy 
of ships for across, leaving on the Baltic Oct. 13 and arriving at 
Liverpool, Oct. 24, 1917, where they entrained at once for South- 
ampton. Several days were spent in the rest camp on the Com- 
mon and on Oct. 29 the organization sailed for Le Havre, France, 
arriving Oct. 30. After a stay of one night at a rest camp, they 
proceeded by train to Rouceaux and Neufchateau, the headquar- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ters of the 26th Division, arriving Nov. 1, and took up the duties 
for which they were organized. Here thev gained their first prac- 
tical experience in handling traffic and some training in horseman- 
ship, in addition to attending drills and lectures. 

Lt. Hawkes \\'as relieved from detached service and rejoined 
his compan>' Dec. 28, 1917. 




1st Lt. Edgar B. Hawkes 

2iid Lt. Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., N. G. 

1st Lt., 103rd M. G. Co. 

(World War) 



On Feb. 6 the Military Police made ready to move to the 
Soissons sector where the division was to go in the front lines for 
the first time. 

On Feb. 8, 1918, Lt. Hawkes, in charge of 30 men of his com- 
pany, left Neufchateau with Co. A, 101st Military Police for duty 
on the Soissons front, rejoining their company on Mar. 27, 1918. 

Detraining at Braisne they immediately took up their police 
duties, stationing men in every town where American troops were 
billeted. Train headquarters were established in Soissons until 
the division was relieved March 18, 1918, when the train moved in 
convov to the Bar-Sur-Aube area. A detachment left at the 



147 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

railhead in Soissons received a heavy bombardment for several 
days, but completed their duties and were commended for their 
line work. 

It was expected that the division would have a rest at the 
Rimacourt area, but after three days orders came to proceed at 
once to the vicinity of Toul. Trains proceeded over the road in 
convoy carrying as many troops as possible, other troops being; 
transported in Camions furnished by the French. Train head- 
quarters established at Menil-la-Tour, Company A at Sansey and 
Company B at Boucq. Here the military police functioned en- 
tirely separate from the French. Lt. Hawkes was detached from 
his company and went to train headquarters where he was acting 
adjutant. 

In addition to the regular duties of general police work, regu- 
lating traffic, and preventing unauthorized persons approaching 
from the rear, the M. P.'s about this time took over the handling 
of casuals and replacements and also formed a Divisional Disci- 
plinary Detachment to handle men serving sentences for minor 
offences. 

On June 28, 1918, the division was relieved from the Toul 
Sector, concentrated in and around Toul and at once ordered to the 
Chateau Thierry sector to participate in the Aisne-Marne offen- 
sive. The military police were stationed near Nanteuil-le-Meaux. 
About 46 towns were occupied by the division. After a few days 
the Division went into the front lines relieving the 2nd division, 
and until the division was relieved again the military police 
worked night and day, contributing in a large degree to the suc- 
cess of the division in the drive. 

On Aug. 8, 1918, the division moved back to area near Le- 
Ferte and on Aug. 1 5 entrained for Chatillon-sur-Seine, the divis- 
ional trains moving over the road in convo3^s. The trains and mili- 
tary police were billeted in the town of St. Colomb. The rest period 
was again cut short and the Division moved up by rail to take 
part in the St. Mihiel offensive, the trains proceeding over the 
road. The train headquarters and military police made stops at 
Trouville, Longeville, Vivaucourt, Heippes, Les Montharion, Gen- 
icourt, finally arriving at Rupt-en-Woevre, Troyon Sector. 

While at St. Colomb orders were received detaching one of- 
ficer and forty-five men of the military police, Company A, for 
temporary duty with the 1st Army in the Toul Sector where they 
remained several weeks, returning later to Rupt-en-Woevre. Dur- 
ing the St. Mihiel offensive, about 2400 prisoners v/ere captured 
and turned over to the military police, conducted to headquarters. 

148 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

where they were examined,listed, questioned by intelligence offi- 
cers, and finally turned over to the Fifth Corps Prisoner of War 
Enclosure at Souilly. 

Company A at this time was stationed at St. Remy. During 
this drive the M. P.'s performed wonderful work in keeping roads 
open and preventing traffic jams, a seemingly impossible task ow- 
ing to the great numbers of troops, heavy guns, ammunition trains 
and vehicles which covered all available space in this big move- 
ment. Lieut. Hawkes had been transferred to the 103rd Machine 
Gun Co. and took part in the infantry advance during the drive, 
serving with the combat troops throughout remainder of the war. 
Owing to Lieut. Hawkes' absence in Australia during last few years 
much valuable data regarding his service could not be secured in 
time to become part of this history. 

During the time the division was stationed in the Troyon sec- 
tor, 2 officers and 100 m.en were called for by the Fifth Corps: as 
all of the two military police companies were being used on mili- 
tary police work, details were made from Infantry and Artillery 
organizations, given police instructions regarding traffic work and 
sent to the Fifth Corps. 

On Oct. 8, 1918, the Division was relieved from the Troyon 
Sector and moved to vicinity of Verdun. Company A was lo- 
cated in camp near Lempiere. While here orders were received 
changing the military police organization. The division was to 
have one company of 200 men instead of the present two com- 
panies of 150 each. The change did not prove satisfactory, but 
had to take place. One hundred men of Company A (including 
nearly all of our Richardson Light Guard boys) were detached 
fiom the Division and sent to the Fifth Corps, forming one half of 
the Fifth Corps .Military Police Company, which relieved the men 
who had been sent there temporarily. Several of the R. L. G. 
boys of Company A were transferred at this time to Company B, 
which on the change became known as the 26th Company Mili- 
tary Police. This company was stationed at Bras, which was the 
division headquarters during the operations in the Verdun Sector. 

After the Armistice was signed the division moved to the 
Montigny-Le-Roi area, the military police staging at Rignacourt, 
Pierrefitte, Willeroncourt, Reffroy, Bonnet, Laurville and Clin- 
ch amp arriving at Montigny-Le-Roi. Military police were placed' 
in every town occupied by the division. Jan. 28, 1919, the 
division moved to embarkation area in and around Ecommoy, 
where the military police were stationed. Here the company 
ceased to function, as area police were on duty shortly after arrival 

149 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

-of division. Soon after, the military police company was de- 
tached from train headquarters and attached to division headquar- 
ters. After the Armistice the military police of the 5th Corps 
were detached and sent to the city of Brussels in Belgium for duty 
in that city, remaining there until early in Summer of 1919 when 
it was returned to the United States and discharged at Camp Dev- 
ens. The R. L. G. men of this company therefore had a varied 
service, having been with the 26th Division on five different fronts, 
with the 5th Corps in the final stages of the war, and in Belgium 
for a considerable period after the armistice. 

While with the 5th Corps after the Armistice, the military 
police attended a special school for that branch of the service. 
Here again the R. L. G. boys won high honors far outclassing in 
their school work all other units and receiving great praise. This, 
oi course, was to have been expected after their wonderful service, 
but nevertheless was pleasing to their friends and a credit to the 
old Richardson Light Guard. 

When one considers the number of villages occupied by a 
division as billets at a time (from 44 to 68), one can realize the 
great amount of work and responsibility of individuals or small 
groups spread over such a large space. The police were always 
on the job even while other troops were resting. The highly 
efficient work at cross roads in the battle areas, nearly always un- 
der artillery fire, prevented many bad situations to troops and ve- 
hicles during active periods while in movement. 

Owing to operation in small detachments, the military police 
did not have a chance to show any spectacular work like the in- 
fantry, and often did not get the attention their faithfulness, 
judgment, and bravery deserved, but their record remains a cred- 
itable one. 

HEADQUARTERS 26th DIVISION 
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCE 

France, March 6, 1919. 
"General Orders 
No. 19 

1. The Division Commander is pleased to call attention to 
the efficient, effective, and enthusiastic work of all officers and 
men connected with the 26th Military Police Company throughout 
their service in France, and to cite this organization in General 
Orders. 

2. The Military Police of this division, by their intelligent 
•control of traffic, especially on those roads in the forward areas of 

150 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

sectors on the Western Front occupied by this division during the 
past year, and along the routes of supply which were frequently 
under heavy shell fire, almost always congested by columns, horse- 
drawn and motor, bringing up supplies of food and munitions, and 
marching bodies of re-enforcements, have played a tremendous 
part in the magnificent successes of the Yankee Division's opera- 
tions. 

3. This organization, as well as many of the individuals 
comprising it, has repeatedly been the subject of favorable com- 
ment and report by officers of the American forces and those of 
our allies. By the efficient performance of their various duties 
and their courageous, courteous, and soldierly bearing, they have 
called attention to themselves as representing the finest type of 
the American fighting man, and have been a great credit to the 
26th Division. 

By Command of Major General Hale: 

Duncan K. Major, Jr., 
Chief of Staff.. 
Official : 
C. A. Stevens 
Adjutant General 
Adjutant. 



151 



Quadr Haqe-kHometr que Systems Umbet 
^ . as . s7 



GROUPE DES CANEVAS I 



%:.^^C\ T^ri 




Vauxaillon — Moisy Ferme Sector 

Chemin des Dames 

Vauxaillon Sub-Sector Occupied by 104th Inf. 

Chemin des Dames. Use Eeacling Glass 

Occupation — one Battalion in Front Lines, one in SnpiDort- 
Trenches and one in Keserve. Map 1 : 10,000 reduced in photo 

The broad black and white line near top represents the Oise 
Canal alongside Ailette Eiver. This Canal was about fifty feet 
wide and at this part was built up from the low ground. The 
Germans held one side and the Americans the other, each shel- 
tered by the banks into which both dug narrow holes for 
protection. 

Just behind the Canal runs the built up railroad which 
crosses the Canal to the left. Dugouts were built in the rail- 
road embankment. The white space behind is open ground to 
the black line representing the main road curving through 
the town Vauxaillon. Behind this are a number of contour 
lines showing steep slopes to the Plateau above represented 
by the white space. This Avas called Mont de Singes — the 
Battalion Command Post being at Moisy Ferme. 

The Support Trenches were located on the Plateau and were 
defended by a number of strong Combat Groups with Machine 
Guns, Auto Eifles, Eifles, Bombs and Eifle Grenades. Similar 
groups at base of slopes covered the open ground to the rail- 
road where smaller groups defended the ground to the Canal 
where outposts were placed. Each group was numbered and 
orders were to resist to death. It will be seen that in all the 
defense the lines of fire cross covering all the ground where 
troops might advance. 

This territory was the scene of several terrible battles in 
which many lives were lost by both French and Germans and 
was given to the 26th Div. to occupy from the French as a Post 
of Honor. The day the 26th Div. was being relieved in this 
Sicctor the Germans started a drive and after a severe battle- 
defeated the French and took all the sector which had been^ 
occupied by the 26th Div. as a "Post of Honor". 



CHAPTER TWELVE 
OFF TO THE FRONT 

In the first week of February, 1918, the preliminary training 
-came to an end. The division was placed under the tactical di- 
rection of the commanding general, 11th Army Corps. A finish- 
ing course of instruction was to be given all the elements in oc- 
cupying a sector on the Chemin-des-Darnes front between Finon 
Forest and Bois-de-Quincy on the left. 

The Division entered the lines, preceded several days by re- 
connoitering parties between February 5 and February 8. In 
each Company two platoons were placed in the line with two pla- 
toons in support, alternating along the front with French com- 
panies. The familiar names of Lifol-Ie-Grand, Soissons, Torny 
Sorny, Chavinguy, Juviguy, Leuilly, Vaupillion, Chavignon, 
Braine will be remembered. Each battalion occupied the front 
lines in turn until all had spent the required time. Then they 
moved back to support positions. The 104th marched to Vau.x- 
rezis, then to new position at Moisey Farm, March I, 1918 in sup- 
port, then to front line at Canal. The 102nd and 101st occupied 
position on the right. Large caves in the quarries were utilized 
for shelter to a great extent in this sector. 

Much in practical trench warfare was learned here. Al- 
though this was supposed to be a quiet sector, much activity soon 
•developed with considerable artillery fire. An expected attack on 
the position which had been held by Capt. Connelly's Company G. 
came the night after his company was relieved by Capt. Ireland 
of Stoneham with Company B. This company repulsed the at- 
tack with losses to the Germans— Capt. Connelly's company being 
held in readiness to counter attack if necessary. At this time the 
Germans thought the new arrivals were British soldiers owing to 
similarity of uniforms. Again on Feb. 28 the Germans attacked 
the Second Battalion, 102nd Infantry, near Chavignon, but were 
repulsed again. March 16 and 17 a heavy bombardment, mostly 
of gas, was directed against the 101st and 1 02nd Infantry between 
Posgny-Filain and Chavignon, causing some losses. 

Raids against the Germans were undertaken for experience in 
■conjunction with the French. On Feb. 23 a volunteer detach- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ment of 101st Infantry raided at Grand Pont, bringing back pris- 
oners. Similar raids were made by 102nd and 104th Infantry. 
The Division was relieved between March 18 and 21st, 1918, just 




stokes Mortar Section of 101st Headquarters Company 



as the Germans started their big offensive taking all the ground' 
later which had been occupied by the 26th Division. As the 
division was being relieved they were subjected to a terrific bom- 
bardment. Forty-three days had been spent in this sector under 
severe v/eather conditions of ram and snow, muddy trenches and' 
difficulties of supply. 

THE LA RHINE BOUCO SECTOR 

After being relieved the division entrained near Soissons for 
vicinity of Bar-Sur-Aube, detraining there and at Brienne Le Cha- 
teau where a five days' march was made to the Rimaucourt 
(Ninth) Training Area, west of Neufchateau. On the way 
maneuvers were worked out and practise given in march discipline, 
billeting and supply while in movement. Roovres, Pertz, Meures 
and Blancheville were used for billeting. Passing through Rimau- 

155 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

court the division reached the respective villages where it was ex- 
pected a rest period would be given and needed shoes and clothing 
issued. 

Before this program could be started a call was made for 
the division to the LaReine or Boucq Sector, northwest of Toul 
where the division relieved the 1st Division, March 28th. The 
village names of Gironville, Broussey, Giravville, Fremerville, 
Jouy, Ansavville, Cornieville, Vertuzey, Vignot, St. Julen, Apre- 
mont, St. Agnant, Marbotte, Bouconville, Ramboucourt, Beau- 
mont, Xivray, Marvoism, Seicheprey, Berniecourt, Royamiex, 
Raulecourt and Gerard-Sas will recall familiar scenes in this sector. 
Division Headquarters were at Boucq. 




A Hurry Call to the Front Trenches 

104th Inf. being rushed to Apremont Sector, April, 1918 



It was in this sector that the R. L. G. boys won distinction in 
the first big action in which .Americans took part. Bois Brule 
(burned woods) in front of Apremont had been the scene of nu- 
merous successful raids on the French. Learning of the occupa- 
tion by Americans, the Germans brought in some of their very best 
"storm troops" determined to teach the Americans a lesson and 



156 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

fcreak up their morale. On April 10, after a bombardment they 
^ittacked the 3rd Battalion, 104th Infantry, but were repulsed. 
Corporals Edgar and Stone were in this battalion. On the night 
of April 10-11, the Second Battalion, 104th, relieved the Third 
Battalion, Capt. Connelly with Company G going into a support 
position. During the night of the 1 1th, the Germans put over a 
heavy gas bombardment. This presaged an attack which came 
■early in the m.orning, directed through the trenches at Companv 
E and Company F who were in front at the time. Company G 
had been "standing to" in the support trenches and were being re- 
lieved for breakfast when the attack came. Wounded men com- 
ing through to aid station told of the fierceness of the attack and 
hand-to-hand fighting in the trenches. 



THE FIGHT AT APREMONT 

The Germans with their storm troops had penetrated the 
trenches at the flanks where the American and French troops 
joined, had taken a section from the French and were rolling back 
the left of Company E when the report of this came to Capt. Con- 
nelly. Without waiting for orders from Battalion commander, 
the captain immediately dispatched a platoon to reinforce Com- 
pany E. They at once got into the hand-to-hand fighting and 
lost one man killed and five wounded. Realizing the seriousness, 
Capt. Connelly reported to the battalion commander and taking 
two more platoons occupied the front trench reorganizing it. The 
Germans had had enough for the morning and were retiring to 
another trench, but keeping the section taken from the French. 
This meant they would attack again. For several hours they 
directed artillery and trench mortar fire on the trenches doing 
much damage, and causing a number of casualties. The grue- 
some details of the fight are purposely omitted. 

Orders came to Capt. Connelly at 6 p. m. to counter attack at 
7 o'clock (p. m.) and clear the Germans from the trenches. 
This was carried out. The Germans expecting an attack through 
the trenches were surprised to see two platoons of American sol- 
diers coming at a rush over the top of their own trenches and 
across the open space. In this, their first attack, Capt. Connelly 
figured the strengthening of morale, in going over the top to ac- 
complish their purpose, would be a help in the future. As an 
added stimulus the captain went over leading his men. 

The surprise was so complete that only two men were wound- 
ed. Sweeping through the communicating trenches the men re- 

157 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

turned to their own trench just as the German barrage fell. This 
continued for an hour, causing casualties. 

Here Corporal Nelson received a mortal shell wound while in 
charge of his squad and was removed to the hospital, but died the 
following day — the first Wakefield boy to be killed. The local 
Post of the American Legion was named for him. 

Corp. Harry E. Nelson was a fine type of American soldier, 
quiet in manner, gentlemanly, but courageous. His death caused 
a sadness in the company by whom he v/as sincerely liked. 

The shelling continued into the night causing much damage to 
the trenches which, in some places, were entirely shot away. 
Capt. Connelly was again ordered to attack on request from the 
P'rench who had not succeeded in cleaning out the Germans from 
their end. At 2.05 a. m. on the 13th, Capt. Connelly with a pla- 
toon attacked along the top of the main trench in conjunction with 
the French. Before meeting the French, the platoon was obliged 
to take to the trench owing to the terrific barrage which wounded 
several of the party. The mission was accomplished, however, 
and the Germans retreated. The American and French patrols 
met and the line VvVis re-established. A continuous bombardment 
continued throughout the day. The incessant shelling was a se- 
vere strain on everybod}', which with the loss of rest for several 
days, showed strongly in the gaunt hollow-eyed faces of the men as 
they filed back through the trenches when their relief took place. 

On April 14 the battalion was relieved and assembled at 
Vignot where it was held in reserve. For the great work accom- 
plished in turning back some of the best German troops, the regi- 
ment was cited by the French 32nd Army Corps and the colors of 
the 104th decorated (by Gen. Passaga) — the first American Regi- 
ment to be decorated by a foreign power. This honor was brought 
about in a great measure by the splendid action of Co. G, led 
by Capt. Connelly who received the Croix-de-Guerre decoration. 
116 men received a French citation and Croix-de-Guerre at an 
elaborate ceremony and review near Boucq on April 28. 1918. 
Seventeen of these men were of Capt. Connelly's company. Corp. 
Nelson was awarded posthumously the Croix-de-Guerre with cita- 
tion for bravery. Corp. Nathan W. Eaton, Jr., was also awarded 
citation and Croix de Guerre for bravery in caring for wounded 
soldiers during this action. Corporals Heustis and Little were 
in the fight and did good work under fire in command of their 
squads. 

To commemorate this achievement of Massachusetts National 
Guard troops, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has appropri- 

158 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

aled |8,000 for a Mural painting to be placed on a wall in the 
:State House. A committee, of which Major Connelly is a mem- 
ber, is in charge of the work which is to be completed in 1927. 

Frank Sibley of the Boston Globe in his history of ^-he 26th 
Division gives great credit to Capt. Connelly for his valor at Apre- 
mont and Mr. Ellis of the Saturday Evening Post wrote, at that 
time, an article of praise which attracted attention all over the 
United States. 




Decorating the Colors of 104th Inf. at Boucq, France, April 28, 
1918, by Gen. Passaga, 32nd Army Corps, France 



A Japanese General in an article in one of the leading maga- 
zines counted this engagement as one of the most important of 
the war as showing the capabilities of the American soldier in de- 
feating German shock troops and doing much to create confidence 
2nd establish a strong morale. 

THE FIGHT AT SEICHEPREY 

Later at Seicheprey and Remieras Woods, a continuation of 
the line from Apremon't, on April 20, the Germans made another 
vicious attack with picked troops. The attack this time fell on 
the 1st Battalion, 102nd Infantry and Company E of the Second 

159 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Battalion in which were included R. L. G. boys. A box barrage 
was put around the town preventing supports coming up and the 
attack swept along behind a rolling barrage until the line was 
reached when columns entered the flanks, went through the town, 
and returned taking prisoners, causing many casualties. The 
102nd recovering from the surprise, counter attacked and drove 
the Germans back, inflicting losses which were augmented by the 
pursuing artillery and machine gun fire. In this engagement 
Private Fay was wounded. 




Ruins of Catholic Church in Seicheprey, France 



Again the Boche attacked the 101st on May 27 at Humbert- 
Plantation near Flirey, but was repulsed with losses. Later the 
101st Infantry made a raid in force against the Germans near 
Richecourt, supported by strong artillery preparation. 

During the month of May the battalions alternated in occu- 
pying the Bouconville and Xivray sections of the line. The 
defense of Bouconville consisted of one company in support in the 
ruined village where cellars were utilized for shelter, and one com- 
pany which occupied two strong points in front of the village Hill 



160 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

2A2 and Hill 246, the road to Xivray running between. Part of 
this company also were quartered in the village. It will be re- 
membered that the ground in front was swampy. Mont Sec 
loomed a short distance away, a stronghold of the Germans. No 
Man's Land in front was constantly covered by large combat pa- 
trols of our troops which were anxious to run into German pa- 
trols. Ambush parties of sixty men were also sent out in front of 
Xivray with the hope of capturing German patrols. The trench- 
es here were in wretched condition owing to the low land, half 
filled with soft mud and water, necessitating wearing of rubber 
boots. Large filthy trench rats were common. Bouconville was 
within good artillery range and the Germans shelled it constantly. 

Later in the month and early June the troops occupied the 
section of the line in front of Rambucourt beyond Xivray which 
was also ruined. A peculiar condition here was met with. In 
front of the H 1 and H 2 positions was the small village of Mar- 
voisin where the kitchens were located. In the daytime part of 
the troops used the cellars here for rest, but at night drew back to 
the trench behind the village to avoid the danger of a raid so that 
the village became part of No Man's Land and had to be con- 
stantly patrolled. The small stream called Rupt-de-Mad flowed 
between this village and the trenches toward Richecourt. It was 
ji;st a few hundred yards to the left of this position where the Ger- 
m.ans put over their raid on the 103rd Infantry in June near 
Xivray and met a severe set-back. 

During the stay in this so-called quiet sector, opposite Mont 
Sec, the Richardson Light Guard had seen real action. At one 
time while in a support position, the First Battalion, 104th, in 
which were R. L. G. boys, received a terrific bombardment, so that 
most of the old company from Wakefield at one time or another 
got a real taste of warfare. 

At Royamiex, Sergt. Better v^'as wounded, and at Bouconville 
Private Blanchard, who had been transferred to Company E, 
104th, from the Military Police, received a severe shell wound. 

From June 24 to 28 the division was relieved by the 82nd 
Division after having been engaged in the occupation of the sec- 
tor for about three months. The division was then concentrated 
near Toul and several days later proceeded to what was supposed 
to be a rest area, but which proved to be another movement into 
active battle work. The division was brought by rail to vicinity 
of Meaux in the Chateau Thierry Sector. 

In the Toul Sector the following men were wounded: Blanch- 
ard, Better, Crowley and Fay. 

161 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

THE AISNE-MARNE (Chateau Thierry) Offensive 

On July 5 the Division moved to support position near 
Montrevil-Aux-Lions. It relieved the Second Division (Marines) 
between July 5 and 8 northwest of Chateau Thierry in the Sector 
"Pas Fini". 7~he line ran from Vaux-Bouresches-Bois de Belleau 
to Bussiares. At this time the division was part of the First 
Corps under Major General Liggett and this was the first time an 
American Corps had entered the line to attack. Here the Division 
suffered as there were no organized system of trenches or shelters 
and it was exposed to constant artillery and machine gun fire and 
the area drenched with gas. Men protected themselves by dig- 
gmg "fox holes". 

Having been sent to officers' school at Gondrecourt (First 
Corps), Capt. Connelly on completion of the course, (in which 
he graduated among the three highest) was ordered to the 92nd 
Division as instructor and was not allowed to rejoin his regiment 
in time for the great offensive of General Foch about to take place. 

July 18 the division took part in the main attack, the 103rd 
and 104th on the left making a difficult turning movement with the 
101st as pivot near Vaux. Until this was completed the general 
line could not be advanced. The 52nd brigade (103 and 104 in- 
fantry) attacked and took the villages of Belleu, Torcy, Givry and 
Flill 193, but met with stubborn resistance in Bouresches Wood 
fiom artillery and machine gun fire. The 51st brigade (101 and 
102 Infantry) on July 20 cleared the eastern part of these woods 
and moved forward. The Division reached the Chateau Thierry- 
Soissons road on July 21 and late in the day advanced on Trugny 
and Epieds which was not carried until July 23, when with artil- 
lery support the 52nd brigade took Epieds and woods beyond, 
while the 51st brigade took the Trugny Wood. Although meet- 
ing with heavy losses the troops went forward steadily, the enemy 
retiring. On July 24 the line ran through Bois LaFere-Breuvardes 
and Le Charmel. On July 25 the Division was relieved by the 
29th Division. The division won high praise from the French 
Army Commander, Gen. DeGouttes. The division had advanced 
from position taken over from Second Marines, a distance of 
17.5 kilometers, taking many prisoners and material. 

In the Pas Fini (Chauteau Thierry) sector the R. L. G. paid 
162 



H 


[ I STORY 


F KiCHARDSON LiGHT GuARD 


a heavy 


toll. 


Fay, 


Fish, 


Meuse 


and Stone were killed 


from wounds and the 


following 


wounded or gassed: 


Behrle 












Harlow 


Brockbank. 


John 


c. 








Alalonson, Frank 


Broekbank, 


Gray 


B. 








Melonson, Fred P. 


Butkn- 












Neiss 


Cayting 












Reobenacker 


CoUins 












Ileissle 


Duggan 












Rhodes 


Fraughton 












Seabury, James 


Gammons 












Seabury, William 


Eastman 












Singer 


Hanright 












Stanley 


Hattiehl 












Wenzel 


Heustis 















AT RFST AREA 
After being relieved July 25-26, the division was placed in 
reserve near Mery-Sur-Marne where training was resumed. Aug. 
13 to 18 the division moved b}' rail to the Chatillon training area 
headquarters at Mussy-Sur-Seine. Here the men received new 
clothing and equipment and many replacements. 




A Troop Train of 26th Division, Moving up to St. Mihiel Sector, 
Aug. 26, 1918 

Active training took place every day for open warfare as 
General Pershing and staff decided the time had come to take 
the Saint Mihiel Salient by American methods. This had been 
attempted by the French who had met with severe losses. It had 
been held for nearly four years by the Germans. 

163 



CHAPTER THIRTEEN 
THE ST. MIHIEL OFFENSIVE 

August 25, 1918, the division began to move by rail to area 
near Bar-le-Duc as part of the Fifth Army Corps. Detraining at 
Nancois-Tronville, A.ugust 29, the troops marched north. This 
movem^ent was to be as secret as possible and every effort was 
made to keep troops under cover by day. Marches were made at 
night, generally to a wood or forest and circulation by day pro- 
hibited. No attempt could be made to drill. March was along 
the route Bois-de-Eriza, Eriza St. Dizier-Seraucourt (Bois Blan- 
din), where camp was made in woods on top of a high hill. The 
march was made to Regnacourt, Mandrecourt, Heippes, Souilly, 
where troops were concealed in Bois le Pretre until next night when 
march was taken up through Souilly, Sennoncourt, Ancemont, 
Dieue, Sommedieu to Camp Logette. From here the columns 
marched to Foret d'Amblonville, Sept. 6, remaining concealed 
there until night, Sept. 11, 1918. 

Capt. Connelly returned from duty with the 92nd Division 
and was made adjutant of 104th Infantry, remaining as such until 
commissioned Major. A number of men who were wounded at 
Chateau Thierry also returned. 

In this so-called Rupt Sector, the division relieved the Second 
Dismounted French Cavalry, Sept. 8. The line extended from 
Les Eparges on the left — Bois des Epapges, Mouilly, Ravin de 
France southwest to Vaux-les-Palameix. The sector remained 
quiet, although the Germans had learned of the coming attack and 
were moving their heavy guns from the salient preparatory for a 
retreat if necessary. On the night of Sept. 11-12 the troops 
marched to their position in Bois Combres for attack. For days 
hundreds of guns, both French and American, had taken position. 
Ammunition trains worked feverishly bringing up thousands of 
shells. Roads leading to the front were almost jammed with 
troops, guns, and vehicles, giving the military police plenty of 
work to keep traffic moving. 

At 1 o'clock on morning of the 12th of September the great 
attack of the American First Army was started with a bombard- 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ment of seven hours by heavier guns. The horizon for miles was 
lighted by the flashes of the guns which fired fast and continuous- 




St. Mihiel Area 
(Rupt and New England Sectors) 



The infantry following a rolling barrage of the French 75's 
attacked at 8 a. m., Sept. 12, in the following order from right to 
left, 101st, 103rd, 104th, in each regiment one battalion in line, 
one in support, one in reserve. For a divisional reserve the 102nd 
Infantry and 101st Machine Gun Battalion were held out. The 
mission was to drive the Germans from the high ground of the 
"Cotes de Woevre. The Germans relied to a great extent on their 



165 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

machine guns well placed in concrete "pill boxes". The 104th: 
Infantry and the French on the left encountered strong resistance 
at first, but this was overcome and rapid advance made, the 101st 
Infantry through the thick woods of the Bois de St. Remy and the 
103rd and 104th over open spaces to Le Chanot Bois where they 
remained that night owing to darkness. 



V 







Trenches on Les Eparges Crest taken by 104th Inf., Sept. 12, 
1918, during St. Mihiel Battle 



During the night information came that the Germans were 
drawing back and the 102nd which had been held in reserve with 
the 102nd Machine Gun Battalion was ordered to make a rapid 
m.arch down the Grand Tranchee de Calonne and eifect a junction 
with the First Division advancing from the south. Without wait- 
ing for the woods, which lined the road, to be thoroughly cleared,, 
the column with advance guard Coinpany E and F, 102nd, moved 
down Calonne (the main road) about 9 p. m., followed by the 
101st Infantry. 

The column passed through Hattonchatet and reached Vig- 
neulles about 2.15 a. m. on Sept. 13. Outposts were sent to cover 
all the roads and along the railroad tracks beyond the village. 



166 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Troops thus controlled the exits of the Salient. Contact was 
made with advanced elements of the First Division by the meeting 
of patrols about 6 a. m., near Hattonville. 

At noon on Sept. 13 the 104th Infantry on the left of the 
103rd reached the heights west of St. Maurice and Billy, occupied 
those villages and the village of Thillot in liason with the 15th 
D. I. C. (French). The villages far out on the plains were out- 
posted by the units in the rear. 

On Sept. 14 the Division moved to the left and took over and 
organized a new sector called New England. The 51st Brigade 
on the right occupied the subsector Massachusetts with two bat- 
talions 102nd in the line, and tke 5-200 Brigade occupied subsec- 
tor Connecticut similarly with 104th Infantry. Both regiments 
had outposts at Saulx. The enemy attacked Company G, 104th 
Infantry, at St. Hiiaire on Sept. 15, but were repulsed losing seven 
prisoners and a machine gun. 

During the advance on Sept. 13 the 104th Infantry pursued 
the enemy so closely that they were unable to remove large stores 
of supplies near Longue Farm and tried to destroy them by burn- 
ing. Fires were burning briskly as the troops passed through. 
At command posts of German officers were found barrels of Ger- 
man beer and tables on which were mugs of beer partly consumed, 
giving evidence of a hasty leave taking. Much material and 
2400 prisoners were taken by the 26th Division. 

The St. Mihiel Salient was taken from the French in the big 
■offensive of 1914, and though strong and bloody attacks had been 
made at great sacrifice, it remained in German hands until cap- 
tured by the .American First Army. This Salient Vv'as termed "a 
dagger aimed at the heart of France" and was a menace to the 
safety of Verdun, cutting the main railway from Paris to Verdun. 
In this last operation it is estimated that General Pershing had 
under his command over 200,000 men, although all were not ac- 
tively engaged in the actual attack. The salient was 35 kilometers 
across, 22 kilometers deep, a frontage of about 65 kilometers and 
in area was about 150 square miles, containing a number of towns 
and villages. In this sector Cummings was killed and Singer, 
John Brockbank and Goodridge wounded. Pvt. John T. Burns 
died of pneumonia in a hospital in September, and later Pvt. 
Vallard. 

Remaining on the line won, the division prepared to resist a 
counter attack and started active raiding operations for prisoners 
in which it was very successful. The enemy artillery fire, both 
^as and explosives, caused a number of losses in the far out vil- 

167 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

lages of Hannonville, Saulx, Wadonville, and Herberville occupied' 
by large outposts. Weather conditions and lack of shelter made 
occupation very tr\dng and later when conditions warranted, such 
troops as could be spared were moved back where better living, 
conditions were possible. About this time the division adopted 
the official insignia — a blue YD monogram on a diamond piece 
of khaki cloth. 




Tresauvaux near Fresne-en-Woevre, France 



THE meusp: argonne offensive 

On September 26 the American First Army started a general 
attack along the whole Meuse Argonne front with the object of 
driving back the enemy and cutting the railroad near Sedan, the 
main line of communication of the German troops from Metz to 
Belgium. 

As a diversion in the general attack the division was ordered 
to make a strong raid on enemy at Marcheville and Riaville. 
The object was to penetrate the enemy's line, take prisoners, occu- 
py the position through the day and withdraw under cover of 
darkness. During a dense fog the operation was carried out with 
machine gun support and artillery fire. The 102nd Infantry met 

168 



MisTORY Of Richardson Light Guard 

with stubborn resistance in front of Marcheville, the Germans 
counter-attacking several times. Success crowned the effort of 
the 102nd who gained the village and later in accordance with the 
plan withdrew nt night. For the meritorious conduct of the raid, 
the 102nd Regimental colors were decorated with the Croix-de- 
Guerre and the First Battalion, 102nd. decorated. For gallantry 
in this action Sgt. Lee was cited and decorated with the Croix-de- 
Guerre. 

While in this sector (Troyon) the 104th Infantry held the 
line from Tresauvaux to Fresnes-in-Woevre, including the high 
hill 372 (Cote de Hures) where the observation post was located. 
The supports remained in the woods in rear (Bois Combres). 

On September 30, Capt. Connelly received the order, dated 
Sept. 13, commissioning him Major and was relieved of his du- 
ties as adjutant, being assigned to command the first battalion 
104th Infantry. During the night Sept. 30-Oct. 1, Major Con- 
nelly marcheci the battalion to Recourt, passing through Rupt, 
Genicourt, and Villers, across the Meuse River. Again the 
Richardson Light Guard boys were under their former commander 
as quite a num.ber of those sent to Company A, 104th, were still 
with this company. During the march to Recourt they were 
drenched with a heavy downpour of rain which seemed to occur on 
nearly every movement. At Recourt, Company A occupied 
abandoned houses, some of which were in fair condition so that it 
was a welcome change from living in the open without shelter. 

A week was spent here in getting cleaned up — baths and de- 
Icusing clothes with portable road machines. Some needed cloth- 
ing and equipment were obtained. Mere the battalion was put 
through a course of training for a week in attack work, much at- 
tention being directed against imaginary machine gun nests. This 
meant that the battalion would be used later in real attack; which 
surmise came true. At Recourt the battalion was selected for a 
division ceremony of decorating certain men. The battalion was 
reviewed by several generals and visiting officers. While at 
Recourt, Major Connelly recei\'ed a visit from Capt. Rogers (pro- 
moted from lieutenant) whom he had not seen since October of the 
preceding year at Le Havre. This illustrates the fact that al- 
though in the same division, men of different units met their 
friends seldom owing to the activity and distance separating them. 
Cases occurred v^'here Richardson Light Guard boys passed each 
other on the road, without knowing it, marching at night in oppo- 
site directions. 



169 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The division relieved from the Troyon Sector, Oct. 8, became 
the army reserve and concentrated in and around Verdun where 
again they were destined to experience more hard and severe con- 
ditions. 




lOlst Inf. Kitchen behind the lines near Samogneux, 
Verdun Sector, France 



On the night of Oct. 8-9 the First Battalion, 104th, began its 
march along the Meuse, passing through Drugny and Landre- 
court. The advance party of guides through a misunderstanding 
directed the columns up a hill to Fort Landrecourt, one of the 
outer forts of Verdun. This was a massive work of stone and 
cement built in the hill and looked like a fine resting place for 
the battalion. No such luck. Major Connelly found the billet- 
ing party comfortably situated in the fort, but knowing they had 
made a mistake secured a French non-com who guided the Bat- 
talion (and the billeting party) to portable wooden barracks near- 
ly a mile away in thick woods. Here the men rested a day when 
the march was resumed at night through Fromerville and Ger- 
mionville to a high hill in Bois Bourrus near Fort Bourrus, Oct. 
10. The next night march was resumed through Chattancourt 



170 



• History Of Richardson Light Guard 

and Cummieres where the battalion was told shelters could be 
found. Again they were out of luck as what few shelters there 
were had become occupied, so the battalion camped on side of hill 
(Cote de Oise). Here a long tunnel led under the hill which was 
used as a shelter by some of the troops, but the ventilation was 
bad. The nights had become frosty, making life in the open very 
uncomfortable. 

After reconnoitering the river for crossing place, the bat- 
talion on the night of Oct. 12-13 marched through Regneville 
passing over the Canal de L/Est and Meuse River on the tempo- 
rary wooden bridge to the ruined village of Samogneux which was 
under constant artillery fire. 




'^^ 



A Communicating Trench in good order on side of hill, 
Verdun Sector 



THE FIGHT IN BOIS HAIJMONT (HAUMONT WOOD) 

Oct. 14 the division became part of the 17th French Corps. 
A.n attack had been planned by the French. On the night of Oct. 
14, 15 the First and Second Battalions of the 104th were hurried to 
Bois Haumont beyond the ruins of Haumont and relieved ele- 
ments of the 18th French Division. The ground here had been 
fiercely fought for, having been won by the Germans some time 

171 



History Of Richardson Light Guard ^ 

before. The French had partly driven them from the woods. 
A French general in charge of the coming attack gave his orders in 
person direct to the captains and platoon leaders, something 
which had never been done before as orders were always issued to 
commanding officers who, in turn, gave orders to the majors. The 
attack was to be made by the infantry following sixteen small 
French Tanks which were supposed to clean up machine gun nests. 
Not liking the details of the plan of action. Major Connelly pro- 
tested to his colonel who concurred with him in his reasons, one 
being that the French Tank Commander had not reconnoitered the 




Dugouts in side of hill at ilaiunoul, uear Samogneux, '♦ erduii Sectt 



ground and intended to go simply by map. The major had placed 
his men — two companies in line and two in support — (one of 
which was Company A) as he reasoned the forward companies 
would move straight to the front and Company A would be saved. 
His consternation can be realized when the French general ordered 
the two support com.panies to go around the flanks of the com- 
panies in the line for the attack. The protests were of no avail 
as the general v/as firm. 



172 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



The attack was made by daybreak, Oct. 16, by Companys A 
and D, First Battalion, and Company E and G, Second Battalion. 
A heavy rain followed by a fog caused bad conditions. The tanks 
got stalled or toppled over in shell holes and were abandoned by 
the French, and only one of the sixteen returned. Heavy artil- 
lery and machine gun fire did not stop the Infantry who gained 
the objective set for them. Owing to losses and impossibility of 
liason in the fog, the platoon commanders withdrew the men when 
the Germans counter attacked. Here the so-called "Death Pla- 
toon" had made their sacrifice. 




Road entering Death Valley near Haumout, Samogneux, 
Verdun Sector 

The brave commander of Company A (Lieutenant Hov/ard) 
was killed as were Corporal Brockbank, Private Duggan, Private 
Donegan and Private Coombs of the Richardson Light Guard 
and Corporal Arthur Walsh, Private McGrath, Private Collins 
and Private Palumbo were wounded. Later that day Major Con- 
nelly using straight tactics made a second attack and cleared the 
woods of the Germans. Several nights later, the enemy made a 
raid on Company A but were repulsed losing a number of men in- 
cluding a German lieutenant, whose body was sent to Regimental 
P. C. for identification by intelligence officers. 

173 



History Of Richardson L. ight Guard 
THE MEUSE-ARGONNE OFFENSIVE CONTINUED 

This sector continued to be a terrible one. The enemy infu- 
riated by their failures shelled the woods continually, throwing in 
considerable gas mixed with the high explosive shells, and kept up 
day and night an harassing machine gun fire which caused a severe 
strain. Conditions were getting bad for the men. Lack of 




A Section of Battlefield, Verdun Sector, After the Meuse- 
Argonne Fight, November, 1918 



shelter, lying in the cold and rain, the ever-present mud, v/et feet, 
made life most uncomfortable and the worst the men had experi- 
enced. After five days the battalion was relieved and marched 
back to Samoeneux then later to Fort ds Marre, passing through 
Vaucherville, Bras, and Charny. Resting one day, the battalion 
returned to Talou Hill marching that night back through Samog- 
neux to Bois d'Ormont to relieve a battalion of the 102nd, who had 
that day made an attack. In for several days here, then out, and 
again sent in to Haumont Bois. A few days here, then to a hill 
in rear of Haumont. After a day in support, the battalion moved 
to a ravine beyond Samogneux. Several days' rest, then up 



174 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

through Death Valley to Bois de Chiene for a few days more in the 
line. 

On October 28 Corporal Andrew McLaughlin was hit in the 
head by a fragment of shell and died in a hospital two days later. 
He is buried in a cemetery near Verdun. 

The battalion moved back to the hill near Brabant, then to 
Samogneux. Considerable sickness, cold, and influenza devel- 
oped depleting the battalion. Incessant hammering at the Germans 
caused the enemy at last to weaken and observation gave evidence 
oi a withdrawal along the back areas. The American forces were 
now preparing to push their attack to a decision along open war- 
fare methods. 




A Ruined Town in Verdun Sector 



On the evening of November 7, Major Connelly marched the 
1st Battalion 104th Infantry, to the woods beyond Haumont and 
started the construction of 1000 yards of trench to be usad later 
by troops for "jumping off" in the attack. The following night 
in a rain storm the battalion went in as support to the second Bat- 
talion, 104th Infantry, at Haumont. At about 2 a. m. a message 
in code was received over the wire m.aking the first Battalion, 



175 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

104th, the attacking battalion and ordering the advance at day- 
break. 

Re-inforced by two platoons of machine gun Company (6 
guns) and two jf MM guns from the Headquarters Company 
I04th, the 1st Battalion moved forward. The battalion was to 
have had a "travelling" 75 MM gun at its disposal in the attack, 
but the gyn never reached the battalion, although Major Con- 
nelly after having been wounded and on his way to first aid station 
met the artillery officer asking for the battalion. He said the 
battalion moved ahead too fast. Owing to the difficulty of carry- 
ing the Stokes Mortar ammunition. Major Connelly was unable to 




Ruins of Village of Neuville, near Samogneux, Verdun Sector 



get the guns in time to be of service in the attack. Clearing the 
woods behind Flabas, the battalion established contact with the 
right element of the 79th Division and moved on through the vil- 
lage of Moirey causing the Germans to retreat. Making a change 
of direction there toward Ville Devant Chaumont and passing 
through part of the 2nd battalion of the 104th Infantry, the 1st Bn 
moved forward. 



176 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

As the battalion was charged with liason of left element of 
the 26th Division and right element of the 79th Division, 
besides protecting a flank of the division, it was neces- 
sary to move slowly as the battalion of the 79th for some reason 
had halted. Expecting the 79th Division to come along. Major 
Connelly continued moving, although under a brisk artillery fire, 
until suddenlv the battalion was enfiladed with fire from machine 
guns on a high hill to the left (Hill 324) in the sector of the 79th 
Division. Malting the battalion. Major Connelly directed fire on 
the hill with three machine guns and one 37 MM gun, also rifle 
fire. This kept down the enemy's fire and helped the 79th which 
tried to advance up the slopes. A German aeroplane appeared as 
though by magic and drove straight at the battalion of the 79th 
with machine gun fire, sending them in confusion down the hill 
where they drew back and reformed. Bringing into play his oth- 
er three machine guns from the flank, Major Connelly kept up a 
terrific fire on the German positions forcing them to cease their 
fire on his battalion. 

During this time the Germans kept up a steady artillery bom- 
bardment to make the 1st Battalion retire but as the Battalion 
had suflered only a few casualties, the Major, instead of retiring, 
moved the line forward to a safer position in shell holes, and wait- 
ed for the 79th Division to advance. Twice they tried to take the 
hill and each time went back leaving the 26th Division exposed 
on the flank. Darkness came on and to fool the Germans and 
keep them from counter-attacking. Major Connelly made two 
feints. About midnight the 79th Division took the hill after a 
bombardment by the American artillery. 

Orders came during the night to advance in the morning of 
the 10th at all costs and keep driving forward. The Battalion 
advanced after da3dight but immediately received a murderous 
fire from machine guns in front of Ville Devant Chaumont and 
from direction of Ville Chaumont. Advancing against this fire 
the Battalion set out to flank the village with two companies while 
the others moved forward. Suddenly Company C was stopped 
and took to shell holes under heavy machine gun fire of the enemy, 
Sending orders to advance, Major Connelly got no response so 
went in person to the company and found the commander shot 
through the thigh and unable to continue. Going in front of the 
company. Major Connelly got them on their feet and started to 
advance when he was shot through the right forearm by a machine 
gun bullet, putting him out of action. His adjutant, to whom he 
had given directions to take command until the Captain of Com- 

177 




Verdun and Meuse-Argonne Sector 



History Of Richarbson Light Guard 

pany A could be reached, was shot through the leg a few min- 
utes later and both went to the same hospital. The two com- 
panies in the meantime had advanced opposite one side of the 
village and halted but were withdrawn by the officer in com.mand. 
Later in the day the village was taken as Major Connelly had di- 
rected. 

For gallantry in this action Major Connelly was recommend- 
ed for the Distinguished Service Cross and later received a Silver 
Star Citation from Washington. 

In the Meuse Argonne (Neptune) Sector the following R. L. 
C. men were killed: John Brockbank, Coombs, Donegan, Duggan 
and McLaughlin (died of wounds). 








37 M. M. Guii in Action, Verdun Sector, Hdqtrs. Co., 101st Inf. 



These men were wounded or gassed in this sector — Eaton, 
Collins, McGrath, Palumbo, A. T. Walsh, McCarthy, J. McWhin- 
nie, Lee, Beebe, Dubois, Stanley, Weaver and Maj. Connelly. 

Lt. Brown was wounded Oct. 9 while with the 32nd IJivision 
in the Argonne. 

Major Connelly was sent to the Field Hospital then to Evacu- 



179 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ation Hospital No. 7 at Souilly and the next day on the hospital 
train to Base Hospital No. 1 14 at Bordeaux. 

On the night of Nov. 10, the Battalion was moved to the right 
to Beaumont to help the lOlst Infantry in the attack on the 11th, 
until operations were halted by the Armistice at 1 1 o'clock that 
day. 

The work of the 101st and 102nd was similar to that of the- 
104th and the occupation of the positions and fighting was very 
much alike. In the Neptune Sector the Division experienced the 
worst conditions of warfare in all phases. Division Headquar- 
ters during this period were at Bras. To those who took part 
in the occupation, the names of the following strong points and' 
centers of resistance will be remembered, Bois de Consenvoye, La- 
Grande Montague, Bois Belleu, Hill 360, Hill 324, Bois d'Ormont, 
Bois de Ville, La Warville, Bois de Chiene, Ville-devant-Chau- 
mont, Bois de Caures. 

A great deal of praise must be given to the engineers for keep- 
ing the roads passable and to the military police in the difficult 
handling of traffic. The ammunition trains performed wonder- 
ful service throughout the war keeping the artillery supplied under 
hard and trying conditions enabling them to assist the infantry in 
forward movements and protecting them in trench warfare. Ma- 
jor Rogers, promoted from Captain, had always an important 
work to perform with his ammunition train whenever the guns 
were used. 

In every modern war however it v»'as always the infantry, the 
"Dough Boys" who finally decided the issue. Working hard, 
marching hard, dirty, carrying heavy packs, exposed to gas, suffer- 
ing from fatigue, cold or hunger, worrying for loved ones at home, 
facing death, but going forward, obeying orders, such was the 
"Dough Boy". Sometimes harassed by the mental strain of 
Clacking rifle fire and the scream or burst of the shells always fall- 
ing, he sometim.es wished he might be hit and put out of misery. 
After it was over he sometimes wondered what it was all about 
anyway and why he was patriotic. Such was the "Dough Boy", 
who when the Armistice was announced did not cheer but calmly 
lay on the ground and tried to make up his lost sleep, after his- 
twenty-five days' stay on the Verdun front. 

180 




Ruins of a Catholic Churcli in Verdun Sector 



CHAPTER FOURTEEN 

AFTER THE ARMISTICE 

On November 14, the division was relieved in the Neptune 
Sector by the 6th Division and commenced a ten days' march to 
the Eighth Training Area around Montigny Le Roi, where divi- 
sion headquarters were established. Stops for billets were made at 
Fort Regret, Ippecourt, Seraucourt, St. Dizier, Loxeville, Trevers, 
Vaudeville, Circourt, Varacourt. From there the 1st Battalion, 
104th, went to Damartin and 2nd Battalion, 104th, to Bonne- 
court. 



AFTER THE ARMISTICE THE EIGHTH TRAINING 
AREA— MONTIGNY LE ROI 

Here in the Montigny ie Roi area was commenced another ex- 
tensive program of training — close order drills, v/ave formations, 
terrain exercises, maneuvers and a lot of attention to athletic work 
to build up the health for a showing when sent home. Clothing 
which was needed, but not obtained at the front was now secured 
easily, delousing and bathing made easier, and feeding better. 
With the strain of fighting over and once more clean and free 
fiom cooties, the "dough boy" regained a healthy condition. The 
second Winter proved much milder than the severe Winter of 1917 
and while there still was the mud and rain, the soldiers did not suf- 
fer so much from the cold. The billets were better, too, so that 
life looked brighter. Men commenced to return from hospitals 
and joined their outfits. Replacements badly needed at the front 
now came to the division in large numbers. The "Yankee" Divi- 
sion at this time numbered men from every state in the Union. 

Dec. 22, 1918 Major Connelly returned from hospital at Bor- 
deau to the regiment and was immediately assigned to the First 
Battalion, 104th, again, although the regiment had its full comple- 
ment of majors and it meant displacing a major from the Regular 
Army. 



H;sTORY Of Richardson Light Guard 

PRESIDFAT WILSON VISITS DIVISION 

An event of importance to the division took place on Christ- 
mas Day. The late President Wilson, who was in France at the 
time, selected the 26th Division as the one to which he would 
make an official visit and inspection. The original intention was 
to have had enlisted men at the dinner in his honor. Prepara- 
tions were made under big difficulties as the number of dishes re- 
quired could not be secured in the area. Final arrangements 
had apparently been completed when for some reason General 
Pershing and staff changed the program, so that officers instead of 
enlisted men would be present. In this the officers were much 
disappointed as they wished the enlisted men to have the honor, 
and they had selected the names. The Richardson Light Guard, 
however, was represented b}' its former commander. Major Con- 
nelly, who received a special invitation with other decorated of- 
ficers. A number of generals and high dignitaries were present at 
the dinner, which was held in a French hospital near Montigny-Ie- 
Roi. It was expected that the President after the dinner would 
give a short speech, but none expected the surprise received, when 
at the conclusion of the dinner the President, rising, moved to the 
door and turning v/aved his hand saying, "Goodbye Boys". Then 
with his attendants he left the building. 

Previous to the dinner a review was held in which battalions 
from each regiment took part. A battalion of the 102nd Infantry 
acted as guard of honor to the President. 

THE FIRST MOVE TOWARD HOME 

Rumors were current during the month of January that the 
division would soon leave for home. About January 28 the divi- 
sion commenced to move to the embarkation area around Le 
Mans. The 104th Infantry battalions marched from their vari- 
ous billeting towns to Domblain where troop trains of the usual 
French type carried them to the new area. It had been cold in 
the old area and there was snow on the ground, but in the new 
area the weather was milder. The various regiments detrained 
at Ecommoy and after a cooked meal prepared there, marched to 
the towns selected for their billets. An idea of the number of 
towns and area covered can be formed by the cut on another page. 

THE LE MANS EMBARKATION AREA 

In this area the towns were of a better type and much cleaner 
than those previously occupied, making things pleasanter for the 

183 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

troops. Here more attention was paid to close order work and 
discipline, with frequent strict inspections of clothing and equip- 
ment to see that every person was provided with each necessary ar- 
ticle before the final inspection which would take place at Brest 
later. Leaves were being granted more freely and a better feeling 
prevailed everywhere. 




ri&i«>.'i^aijVtA^=— 



■Ll MAMSAfStA 

-Divi5iC'-iA',.ABru-A'-..C."?oumZ.oNe.- 

Di3P05iTiONor Units 26* Dw 



Area Around Ecommoy 
Occupied by 26th Div. Previous to Return to U. S. 



THE DIVISIONAL TOURNAMENT AT ECOMMOY 

A program was announced during February of a divisional 
tournament to take place on March 10, II, 12, consisting of box- 
ing, football, soccer, and military events like platoon drills, gas 

184 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

mask race, equipment race, squad drill, and a company drill which 
included a road march with full equipment. Most of the R. L. G. 
boys were stationed at this time in Grande Luce and St. Mars. 
Considerable rivalry began to manifest itself among the different 
regiments. Col. Cheatham of the 104th expressed his desire that 
the 104th win this tournament and directed the battalion com- 
manders to get busy. Major Connelly decided that his battalion 
would have to be a factor in the point winning so determined to 
concentrate on two events involving the greatest number of points. 
Some of the officers did not show the proper spirit to develop win- 




Col. B. F. Cheatham, 104th Inf. 

Eeceiviiig the Divisional Cup 
won by 104th Inf. at Division 
Games, Eeommoy, France, Feb- 
ruary, 19J9. Gen. Harry F. 
Hale in foreground, Maj. Con- 
nelly and Capt. Stiles in rear 
of Col. Cheatham 



ners so the m.ajor took a platoon from Company D which was the 
worst in the battalion and drilled them personally to show what 
could be done. Then assigning a new lieutenant to the platoon 
and supervising it, he soon developed what appeared to be a strong 
contender. Taking the sam.e company he accomplished a like re- 
sult. At the elimination tests of platoon, company, battalion, 
and regiment, these two units won steadily to the chagrin of the 
other companies, and became the representatives of the regiment. 
At the tournament they won by a big margin, justifying Major 



185 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Connelly's judgment. The total points of these two events alone 
were greater than that of the whole 51st brigade and enabled the 
104th Infantry to win the Di\'isional Trophy — a cup which is at 
the headquarters of the 104th, in the Springfield Armory — another 
triumph for the Richardson Light Guard. 

A few days later at the rifle range at Ecommoy a Division 
review was held and the troops inspected by Gen. Pershing. This 
was a tedious aflfair lasting from 6 a. m. until 5 p. m., the troops 
standing in cold marshy ground. 

In March 1918 Major Connelly was selected as a delegate 
from the 104th Infantry to the convention at Paris which organ- 
ized the American Legion. 

TME MOVE TO BREST AND HOME 

The division entrained about the 19th for Brest preparatory 
to leaving for home. Here camps under canvas were occupied at 
Pontenason while various records were made out, delousing and 
baths attended to, and numerous inspections made. 

On March 29 the 104th embarked on the Mt. Vernon, reach- 
ing Commonwealth Pier, Boston, April 4, 1918. The lOIst fol- 
lowed on the American the next day and the 102nd on the Aga- 
memnon. Trains were taken at the docks for Camp Devens 
where the Division was mustered out of service about April 29. A 
Division Review was held at Cam.p Devens which attracted many 
thousands of spectators. 

April 25 the Division paraded in Boston, making a spectacu- 
lar showing during which it was viewed by a tremendous crowd 
who, despite the cold wind, gave the boys a warm welcome after 
■eighteen months of overseas service in which the Yankee Division 
distinguished itself. 

The Yankee Division was the first complete division to reach 
France and the first to take over a division front in the line. It 
has a record of 212 actual days in the front and ground gained in 
action of 37 kilometers. As a division it received over 1 50 cita- 
tions or commendations from the French government. 

The following sectors were occupied: 

Chemin-des-Dames, Northeast of Soissons, Feb. 6-Mar. 21, 
1918. 

La Reine and Boucq, North of Toul, April 3-June 28. 

Pas Fini, Northwest of Chateau Thierry, July 10-July 25. 

Rupt and Troyon, North of St. Mihiel, Sept. 2-Oct. 5. ' 

Neptune, North of Verdun, Oct. 10-Nov. 14. 

The division had a casualty list of 11,955 killed, wounded 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

and missing. It is rated by the War Department in point of ser- 
vice as second m the list of combat divisions, the First Division 
being accorded first place. The Yankee Division has the honor 
of having one of its regiments (the 104th) the first American unit 
to be decorated by a foreign government. Another of its regi- 
ments (102nd Infantry) was also decorated by the French govern- 
ment later. 




Greenwood Boulder 

(In front of Greenwood School, Main Street) 

Dedicated May 14, 1920 

A Memorial to the Men and Women of Greenwood who 

served in the World War and in memory of those 

who made the Supreme Sacrifice 



187 



CHAPTER FIFTEEN 

THE HOME COMING 

On April 9 a committee of citizens with automobiles journeyed 
to Camp Devens to bring home to Wakefield about fifty of the 
Richardson Light Guard boys who had returned with the 26th 
Division. Thousands of people lined the streets as the machines 
drove through the town to the armory at 5.30 p. m. A continu- 
ous din of horns, cowbells, tooting of factory whistles, and fire 
alarm, ringing of church bells, and shrieks of fire truck sirens 
gave evidence of a sincere welcome. A crowd packed the armory 
to the walls. Commander J. Warren Poland of Post 12, chair- 
man of the day's special committee, Chairman Charles E. Walton 
of the general reception committee, Chairman John J. Round of 
the Selectmen, extended brief words of welcome. Later Rev. 
Florence J. Elalloran welcom.ed the boys in a short but sincere and 
eloquent address, paying a high tribute to their sacrifice. Major 
Connelly responded for the boys, thanking the people for their 
wonderful greeting and expressing the happiness of the Richardson 
Light Guard at being once more back safe in Wakefield. Miss 
Elisabeth Gleason sang, "America", and the "Battle Hymn of the 
Republic," the crowd joining in the choruses. 

After the crowd had been given an opportunity to shake the 
hands of the returned soldiers, they were treated to a buffet lunch, 
■cigars, and cigarettes and then went to their homes. 

The automobiles were owned and driven by Charles N. Win- 
ship, William E. Arnold, Dr. J. William O'Connell, Arthur C. 
Verge, Christopher F. Collins, J. Lowe McMahon, Rev. Benjamin 
G. Seaboyer, L. E. Nichols, Thomas E. Dwyer, and Almonte H. 
Fairbanks. John J. Round, Dr. Edward J. Donovan and Mr. 
Collins had tire trouble and had to transfer their passengers to 
other cars. 

The Lady Associates of Company A, who served the refresh- 
ments v/ith the committee were Mrs. Edward J. Connelly, Mrs. 
Anna Brockbank, Miss Marjorie D. Hawkes, Mrs. Catherine Mc- 
Mahon, Mrs. Julia Thompson, Mrs. Mary Seabury, Mrs. H. E. 
Harper, Mrs. Maurice Lane. The reception committee comprised 
J. Warren Poland, George H. Taylor, Frank H. Hackett, Daniel 

188 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

H. Regan, Thomas G. O'Connell, Charles N. Winship, Rev. F. S. 
Boody, Rev. William H. Flynn, Capt. John L. Downing, Chair- 
man John J. Round of the Selectmen and Chairman Charles E. 
Walton of general reception committee. Committee on lunch — 
Daniel H. Regan, Capt. John L. Downing, George H. Taylor. 

Committee on blowing fire alarm and ringing of bells — J. 
Warren Poland. 

Committee to provide automobiles — C. F. Collins, H. M. 
Wheeler, Rev. Benjamin G. Seaboyer and Gardner E. Campbell. 

Committee to Camp Devens on official welcoming committee 
— Chairman John J. Round of the Selectmen, Chairman Charles 
E. Walton, Rev. Florence J. Halloran, Charles N. Winship and 
J. Warren Poland. 

To commemorate the service of Wakefield soldiers the town 
voted to present a medal to each soldier and a committee was ap- 
pointed for the purpose, with Gardner E. Campbell, chairman. 

On Feb. 26, 1919, the first of several exercises in connection 
with the presentation and reception was held in Town Hall. La- 
ter other receptions were held according to the number of returned 
veterans. The Lady Associates of Co. A, headed by Mrs. Ed- 
ward J. Connelly, were assigned the honor of pinning on the med- 
als. Included in these meetings were a few R. L. G. boys who had 
returned home wounded, ahead of the division. 

At the Welcome Home Celebration in October the other Rich- 
ardson Light Guard members received their medals. 

BANQUET TO CO. A BY LADY ASSOCIATES 

On Tuesday evening, Sept. 30, 1919, the Lady Associates gave 
a complimentary banquet to the former Co. A members at the Ar- 
mory. Caterer C. C. Whittemore furnished an unusually fine 
spread which was enjo3/ed by the large turn-out of the former 
company. Lt. Col. John H. McMahon acted as Toastmaster. 
The only guests invited were the officers of the State Guard Com- 
pany, it being a Richardson Light Guard affair. 

The committee on arrangements were — Mrs. Edward J. Con- 
nelly, chairman; Mrs. Fred H. Rogers, Miss Marjorie D. Hawkes, 
Mrs. Julia Thompson, Mrs. Anna Brockbank, Mrs. L. A. Holden, 
Mrs. Margaret Reissle, Mrs. A. C. Sargent, Miss H. Goodridge, 
Mrs. Charles L. Harlow, Mrs. H. E. Harper, Mrs. Barnet Gersi- 
povitch. Miss Anna Lee. 

Oct. 1, 1919. On the following evening, Wednesday, the 
Lady Associates gave a dance to which all veterans were invited 
whether members of Co. A or not. This was a very enjoyable 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

affair and was very largely attended by men in uniform. Mrs. 
E. J. Connelly was in charge of the arrangements, assisted by the 
Seme committee of Lady Associates which had charge of the ban- 
quet of previous evening. 

On the Tuesday evening following, the Lady Associates of Co. 
A wound up their affairs as an organization and disbanded. The 
balance in their treasurv was divided equally and donated to 
the new Company A ($65) and Corp. Harry E. Nelson Post No. 
63, American Legion (|65). Four members who had not re- 
turned from service were not overlooked and provision was made 
to entertain them on their return. Thus passed an organization 
of mothers, wives, sweethearts, sisters and friends which is held 
in grateful memorv- 



THE HOME-COMING OF WAKEFIELD SOLDIERS 
OCTOBER 13, 1919 

What was considered by many as the most memorable cele- 
bration ever held here, or at least in a quarter of a century, was 
the "Welcome Home" of the loyal sons of Wakefield from across 
the seas. It was a day never to be forgotten by Wakefield peo- 
ple and fully twelve or fifteen thousand people witnessed the cor- 
dial greetings extended by townspeople and others who came to 
Wakefield for that long-anticipated day of days. 

The day was cloudless, and fully 5,000 men, women and chil- 
dren were in the parade. Stirring bands and enthusiasm incident 
to returning veterans after months of patriotic service made the 
day conspicuous, from the viewpoint of notable days in the town's 
long and honorable military history. 

Perhaps best of all the many things which contributed to the 
truly remarkable celebration of victory and home-coming was the 
presence of Maj.-Gen. Clarence R. Edwards, commander of thii 
26th Division, in which about 200 of Wakefield's 750 veterans 
served. General Edwards was greeted with a mighty cheer when 
he mounted the band stand on the park to address the vast audi- 
ence. At the time of his arrival Rev. F. J. Halloran, rector 
of St. Joseph's Church was delivering an inspiring address of wel- 
come, on behalf of the town, but he paused, on seeing Gen. Ed- 
wards, and said: "I am proud to be interrupted to greet the best- 
loved General in America." 

The parade started exactly on the dot at the appointed hour. 
Lt.-Col. John H. McMahon was chief marshal, and Dr. J. Wil- 
liam O'Connell adjutant. Veterans of the Civil War and the 

190 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Spanish War, the "boys" of former days who, too, had bared their 
breasts in defense of their country, were given honored places in 
line. The line of march was lined with spectators on foot and in 
automobiles who applauded heartily the heroes as they passd. 
The sadder side of the grand review was the presence of many 
returning veterans who were unable to march, but who were con- 
veyed by autos; and sadder than this incident was the realization 
that beyond the Atlantic Ocean, were the remains of many of 
Wakefield's brave boys v^^ho had paid the supreme sacrifice, and 
whose presence was solely missed on this great day of intended re- 
joicing. 

The route of the parade was from Wakefield Square along 
Chestnut street. North avenue, Yale avenue. Main street, Park 
street. Pleasant street, Salem street, to the Common, where all 
marching organizations and visiting guests assembled around the 
band stand. 

Exercises at the band stand were impressive and enthusiastic, 
furnishing an inspiring spectacle never to be forgotten. Khaki- 
clad war veterans, blue-jacketed lads of the Navy, Red Cross 
nurses and yeo-girls occupied conspicuous places near the speakers, 
from whom high tributes were paid. Rev. Warren S. Perkins, 
pastor of the Universalist Church tenderly offered the invocation, 
especially remembering President Wilson, then suffering from ill- 
ness, also parents of the boys who had lost their lives, and to whom 
the day m.eant a day of great bereavement, yet mingled with grati- 
tude. Father Halloran, as already noted, who had delivered the 
address of farewell when the Richardson Light Guard left Wake- 
field in response to the country's call, paid a glowing tribute to 
the boys who had fought under the colors. His scholarly and pa- 
triotic tribute left a deep impression on all who were privileged to 
hear him. 

Major Edvv'ard J. Connelly, with whom General Edwards had 
marched during the parade (the latter having declined to ride, but 
preferred to walk by the side of his valued comrade and friend) 
Avas likev^ise given a tremendous ovation when introduced by 
Chairman Charles E. Walton of the town's reception committee. 
Maj. Connelly graciously thanked the town of Wakefield for 
showing appreciation of the deeds of service men. Maj. Connelly 
paid a high tribute to Gen. Edwards, adding that the General 
had the highest affection of mothers and fathers of all the service 
men for his humane and considerate care of men in his command. 
Maj. Connelly urged the service men to "deliver the goods" in 
civilian life as they had done while serving the colors. 

191 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

When Gen. Edwards was introduced the ovation equalled 
that of his initial appearance, for rarely has a speaker been accord- 
ed such a flattering welcome as the idol of the Yankee Division. 
Gen. Edwards paid high praises to Maj. Connelly whom he said 
was fully deserving of his promotion, following an unusual demon- 
stration of loyalty and bravery. Gen. Edwards also paid high 
tributes to Capt. Paul H. Taylor of the Ordnance Department and 
other Wakefield officers and men. "The Yankee Division never 
heard of the conscientious objector and didn't know there was any 
such animal" said Gen. Edwards, in referring to the loyalty of 
his men. "You had a stout-hearted and game lot of men in the 
service. I congratulate Wakefield on its participation in the 
war, and thank Wakefield for its magnificent demonstration today. 
Things like this give definite hope of the future and make people 
smile," said Gen. Edwards in closing. 

Gen. Edwards' aide read the roll of honor of Wakefield's sons 
Vk'ho paid the supreme sacrifice during the war; also those who were 
wounded in the service and those who were cited for bravery 
and gallantry in action. There were 750 Wakefield men under 
the colors, of whom 200 were in the Yankee Division. Twenty- 
nine paid the supreme sacrifice, 19 being killed in action, 8 dying 
of disease and 2 dying from accidents. In the 26th Division, 
there were 15 who died in the service. In the town's list there were 
80 wounded, 37 cited for braveiy of whom 30 were in the Yankee 
Division; 70 officers in the war of whom 12 were Y. D. men. 

Chairman John J. Round of the Board of Selectmen presented 
two flags to Corp. Harry E. Nelson Post 63, American Legion; the 
Stars and Stripes and Union Jack, representing the Army and 
Navy. Presentation by Mr. Round of medals provided by the 
town, concluded the ceremonies on the Common. 

Late in the afternoon a banquet was served in the Armory, at- 
tended by about 500 people. Speech-making was purposely dis- 
pensed with, but greetings were extended by Chairman Walton of 
the town committee. The armory was appropriately decorated 
for the occasion. After the banquet an entertainment was pro- 
vided at the Princess Theatre and Wakefield's official Welcome 
Home was concluded. In the opinion of many who had witnessed 
celebrations in other places, Wakefield's exercises were conceded 
to be more elaborate and patriotic than exercises held in larger 
places, again demonstrating the assertion so frequently applied to 
Wakefield, that the town fulfilled obligations in this, as in every 
feature and incident associated with the World War; for no ex- 



193 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

pense or detail was spared to make the day gratifying in every re- 
spect. 

Business blocks, stores and private dwellings were appro- 
priately decorated for the occasion. There were four divisions in 
the parade, and about a dozen committees and official representa- 
tives of the town worked for weeks in making arrangements for 
the event. 







Accolade Given to Soldiers Wounded 
in World War 



194 




t#^^ 










R. L. G. Men Who Gave Their Lives in the Service 
During the World War 

Upper Eow, left to right: Cpl. CroAvell G. Fish, Co. A, 104th Inf.; 
1 CI. Pvt. Echvard M. Fay, Co. D, 102nd Inf.; Cook, Joseph J. 
Buckley, 4th Pioneer Eegt. ; Centre : Cpl. Harry E. IS^elson, Co. 
G, 104th, Inf. ; Lower Eow, left to right : Pvt. Thomas E. Meuse, 
Co. F, 102nd Inf.; Pvt. Timothy E. Cummings, Co. A, 104th Inf.; 
1 CI. Pvt. Eoy P. Stone, Co. A, 104th Inf. 





it 



^^'1 



^ 



'^^^i 




R. L. G. Men Who Gave Their Lives in the Service 
During the World War 

Upper Eow, left to right: 1 CI. Pvt. Wilfred A. Vallard, Hq. Co., 
101st Inf.; Cpl. John C. Brockbank, Co. A, 104th Inf.; Cpl. John 
P. Duggan, Co. A, 104th Inf. ; Centre : Cpl. Andrew P. McLaugh- 
lin, Co. A, 104th Inf.; Lower Eow, left to right: 1 CI. Pvt. John 
T. Burns, Hq. Co., 101st Inf. ; Pvt. Carl L. Coombs, Co. A, 104th 
Inf.; Pvt. John P. Donegan, Co. A, 104th Inf. 



CHAPTER SIXTEEN 

THE SUPREME SACRIFICE 

"Those who have passed from this world only die, when we 
whom they loved, have forgotten them." 

Of the twenty-nine Wakefield men who died from disease and 
wounds, or who were killed outright, fourteen, or nearly fifty per 
cent were Richardson Light Guard members. Had Co. A gone 
through the World War as an organization there is no doubt that 
the losses would have been far greater than they were. 

HONOR ROLL 

Brockbank, John C, Cpl. Fay, Edward M., 1 CI. Pvt. 

Buckley, Joseph J., Cook Fish, Crowell G., Cpl. 

Burns, John T., Pvt. McLaughlin, Andrew P., Cpl. 

Coombs, Carl L., Pvt. Meuse, Thomas E., Pvt. 

Gumming, Timothy E., Pvt. Nelson, Harry E., Cpl. 

Donegan, John P., Pvt. Stone, Roy P., 1 CI. Pvt. 

Duggan, John P., Cpl. Vallard, Wilfred A., Pvt. 

The Richardson Light Guard suffered a high percentage of 
casualties other than those who died, as the following list testifies. 
Il has been difTicult to accurately check all those who were wound- 
ed owing to the men not replying to information cards and the 
fact that after the 6th Regt. was broken up no records were cen- 
trally kept as would have been the case if all were in one company. 
There were some cases of men wounded or gassed who were not of- 
ficially recorded and to whom no wound stripes were issued. For- 
ty-two men were authorized to wear wound chevrons, five of whom 
were wounded in two different battles, making a total of 47. 
This added to the number of dead makes a total of 61 casualties — 
40 percent of the original 1 50 men — showing that the Richardson 
Light Guard saw considerable action in the World War. 



History Of Richardson Light Guariv 

R. L. G. WOUNDED 

Beebe, John H., Jr. Hatfield, George E. 

Behrle, Joseph F. Heustis, George B. 

Better, Edward F., Jr. Lee, John J. 

Blanchard, Leon A. Malonson, Frank J. 

Brockbank, Gray B. Mellen, Ernest E. 

Brockbank, John C. .Melonson, Fred P. 

Brown, James G. McCarthy, Frank E. 

Butler, J. M. McGrath, John F. 

Cayting, Hayward C. McWhinnie, Ernest J. 

Collins, James Neiss, Archie J. 

Connelly, Edward J. Palumbo, John 

Crowley, John J. Reebenacker, Edward K. 

DeRoche, George B. Reissle, Frederick K. 

Dubois, Victor A. Rhodes, William H. 

Duggan, John P. Seabury, James S. 

Eaton, Nathan W., Jr. Seabury, William D. 

Eastman, Ernest E. Singer, Norman C. 

Fay, Edward M. Stanley, Calvin R. 

Fraughton, George P. Wenzel, William L. 

Gammons, Frank W. Walsh, Arthur T. 

Goodridge, Carl W. Weaver, Percy R. 
Hanright, Thomas E. 

DECORATIONS AND CITATIONS OF R. L. G. MEN FOR 

GALLANTRY IN ACTION 

The Richardson Light Guard by the extraordinary perform- 
ance of service in France brought high honors to the town of 
Wakefield. Its record should be a source of pride to those who> 
believe that true Americanism includes loyalty and service ta 
country though that service may mean sacrifice of opportunity, 
financial advancem.ent and life itself. 

President Coolidge is quoted as stating that "A man's life: 
belongs first to his country." 

There are a number of R. L. G. men deserving of decoration 
whose acts, due to stress of circumstances, passed unnoticed dur- 
ing engagements with the enemy. To receive a decoration or 
citation one must be recommended in writing by a person in au- 
thority who has been an eyewitness or has positive knowledge of 
the act performed. This recommendation is then considered by 
a board who approves or disapproves the award. 



The 104th Inf., the first U. S. regiment to receive a foreign 
decoration, numbered in its ranks R. L. G. men who in a large 
m.easure were responsible for the success of the actions which re- 
sulted in this great honor. In the 102nd Inf. and lOIst Inf we 
also find R. L. G. heroes, and again we find the Military Police, iii: 
Vv'hich were R. L. G. men, cited. 

198 




R. L. G. Men Decorated in World War 

Capt. Edward J. Connelly, Co. G, 104th Inf.; Sgt. John J. Lee, 

Co. D, 102nd Inf.; Sgt. Nathan W. Eaton, Jr., Co. G, 104th Inf ; 

Cpl. Victor A. Dubois, Hq. Co., 101st Inf.; Cpl. Otis L. Stone, 

Co. K, 104th Inf.; Cpl. Harry E. Nelson, Co. G, 104th Inf. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Gapt. Edward J. Connelly, 104th Inf., awarded Croix de 
Cuerre with gold star, and following citation 32nd Army Corps 
(French). 

32d Corps D'Armee 
Etat-Major 
Ler Bureau Personal 

Extrait de L'ordre General No 736 — A 
Le General commandant le 32 eme corps d'armeo, cite a l'ordre 
■du corps d'armee, les militaires dont les noms suivent. 
Edward J. Connelly, Capitaine au 104 R. I. 

"A fait preuve des plus belles qualites de calme, de courage 
at de jugement dans le commandement au feu de la Compagnie G, 
les 12 et 13 Avril 1918. A deux reprises operant en liaison avec 
des troupes francaises, a entraine ses hommes dans des contre- 
attaques menees avec la plus grande vigueur et qui ont oblige 
Tennemi a se retirer dans ses lignes". 
Pour Amplication 
-Le chef d'etat-Major Q. G. le 26 Avril 1918 

S. Man qui 

Le General Passaga, Cdt., le 32 eme C. A. Passaga 

Translated — "Showed finest qualities of calm, courage and 
judgment in com.mandmg Company G under fire, the 12th and 
13th of April. in two attempts, operating with the French, he 
led his m.en in counter-attacks with great vigor and forced the 
enemy to retire into his own lines." 



Citation Orders, No. 1 American Expeditionary Forces, 
France. Capt. Edward J. Connelly — for gallantry in action at 
Bois Brule, Apremont. 



United States Army Citation, Captain Edward J. Connelly, 
104th Inf. For distinguished and exceptional gallantry at Bois 
Brule Apremont, on 12 and 13 April 1918 in the operation of the 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

in testimony thereof, and as an expression of appreciation of his 
valor, 1 award him this citation. 
Awarded on 27 March 1919. 

John J. Pershing, 
Commander-in-Chief. 

201 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
Tv/o citations in Divisional Orders. 



Twice recommended for Distinguished Service Cross. 



Awarded Citation Diploma by French Government which 
was forwarded through the French Ambassador at Washington 
and received Dec. 1925. 

Maj. Edward J. Connelly awarded Silver Star Citation by 
War Department, March 1, 1923. 

"Edward J. Connelly, Major, First Battalion, 104th Infantry, 
Twenty-Sixth Division. For gallantry in action on Nov. 9, 10, 
1918, between Bois D'Maumont and the town of Ville-Devant- 
Chaumont, France. On the afternoon of Nov. 9 he personally 
and with great gallantry led his battalion, greatly reduced in 
numbers, in the attack, driving the enemy back into the town, in 
the face of terrific machine gun and rifle fire from his front as well 
as from the hills at his left. 

On the morning of Nov. 10 he again, with splendid courage 
and devotion to duty, led the advance of his battalion until se- 
verely wounded. FHs complete disregard for his own safety, his 
fine courage and leadership, proved a wonderful stimulus to the 
men of his command. 



Corporal Nathan W. Eaton, Jr., Co. G, 104th Inf., awarded 
Croix de Guerre and citation 32nd Army Corps French, April 
26, 1918. 

"Remarkable courage and ability in aid given to wounded 
under violent bombardment during the battle of April 12." 



Corporal Harry E. Nelson, Co. G, 104th Inf., awarded Croix 
de Guerre (Posthumously) and citation. 

"Remarkable coolness and courage in the command of his 
squad under violent fire, was mortally wounded on April 13. 



Corporal Otis L. Stone, Co. K, 104th Inf., av/arded Croix de 
Guerre and Citation (French), Divisional Citation, and Distin- 
guished Service Cross with Army Citation. 

202 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Headquarters 26th Division 
American Expeditionary Forces, 

France, Aug. 31, 1918. 
'General Orders 

No. 74 

Extract 

1. The Division Commander takes great pleasure in citing 
in orders the following named officers and men who have shown 
marked gallantry and meritorious service in the capture of Torcy, 
Belleau, Givry, Bouresches Woods, Rochet Woods, Hill 190, over- 
looking Chateau Thierry, Etrepilly, Beguet, Epieds, Trugny and 
La Fere Woods to the Jaulgonne — Fere-en-Tardenois Road, dur- 
ing the advance of this Division against the enemy from July 18th 
to 25th, 1918 in the Second Battle of the Marne. 



Corp. Otis L. Stone, Co. K, 104th Inf., 

C. R. Edwards, 
Major General, Commanding. 
Letter to Corp. Stone: 

I have read with m.uch pleasure the reports of your regimen- 
tal commander and brigade commander regarding your gallant 
conduct and devotion to duty in the field on July 22, 1918, rescu- 
ing a wounded comrade under heavy enemy fire at Epieds in Sec- 
cond Battle of the Marne, and have ordered your name and deed 
to be entered in the record of the Yankee Division. 

Signed C. R. Edwards, 

Maj.-Gen. Commanding 26th Division. 

Corporal John J. Lee, Co. D, 102nd Inf. Awarded Croix de 
'Guerre with Palm, French Citation, and Divisional Citation. 

"Le Caporal John J. Lee de la Compagne D du 102 Regiment 
d'lnfanterie Americaine. 

Ra montre une grande bravoure sans le par alors qu'il etait 
■charge de prende les tirsurs ennemes. Ov I'appel de volentaires, ? 
pris san fusil mitraillsur et a advance sans un feu violent de 
mitraillsuser, obligsant I'ennemi a reculer." 

Ordre No. 12, 245 "D" Du Quartier 
General le 11 Decembre, 1918. Le Marechal 
Commandant en Chef, les armies de I'Est. 

Retain 



203 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Headquarters 26th Division, 
American Expeditionary Forces, 

France, Oct. 16, 191b\ 

General Orders 
No. 88 

Extract 

The Division Commander is pleased to cite in orders the fol- 
lowing named officers and men and congratulates them on their 
exceptionally meritorious service and gallant conduct during the 
operations of the division against the enemy at Marcheville and 
Riaville on September 25th and 26th, 1918. 

Under a terrific enemy artillery bombardment lasting for 
nearly twenty-four hours and under intense machine gun fire and 
in fierce hand to hand conflicts with grenades, rifle, pistol and 
bayonet, these officers and soldiers accomplished their mission and 
broke up four counter-attacks. 

Corp. John J. Lee, Company D. 102nd Inf. 

C. R. Edwards, 
Major General,- Commanding. 



Corp. Victor A. Dubois, awarded Distinguished Service Cross 
with citations (American) and Croix de Guerre and citation 
(French). 

War Department, 
Washington, Feb. 1, 1919. 
General Orders 
No. 21 
Award of Distinguished Service Cross 

Victor A. Dubois, Corporal, Headquarters Company, 101st 
Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action north of Verdun. 
France. October 23, 1918. When the sergeant in charge of his 
wire laying detail v*'as wounded he assumed command and, al- 
though himself wounded, continued to work and established liason 
with the assaulting battalion. He then went back to the wound- 
ed sergeant, administered first aid, and brought stretcher bearers 
to him. 

204 



History Of R i c h a k d s o n Light Guard 

Corp. Percy H. Young, Headquarters Co. 101st Inf., recom- 
mended for Croix de Guerre and cited in Division orders. 
Citation Percy H. Young, Hq. Co., 101st Inf. 
"I have read with much pleasure the reports of your regi- 
niental commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion 
to duty in the field from October 23rd to 28th, 1918, northwest of 
Verdun, and have ordered your name and deed to be entered in the 
records of the Yankee Division. 

C. R. Edwards, 
Major General, Commanding 
the 26th Division. 



1st CI. Pvt. John M. Butler, recommended for Distinguished 
Service Cross and cited in Division orders. Copy has not been 
obtained of the Division Citation but wording is similar to those 
of other men. 



zus 



CHAPTER SEVENTEEN 
BASKET BALL AND ATHLETICS 

In 1903 Company A started basket ball again after a lapse 
of six years. At that time the game was played with eleven men 
on a team and more like indoor football. Company A put a 
team on the floor under the new rules which called for five-men 
teams and required much more cleverness than the old-style game. 
Considerably handicapped at the start, as none of the men had 
ever played before and having no coach, things did not look so 
bright, but each man bought his suit and started practise with ;i 
football which was oval in shape and hard to handle. A little la- 
ter the team was fortunate in getting a regular basket ball which 
was round and easier to handle. 

The first game was with the Sons of Veterans of Woburn 
and was won by the score of 32 to — a record score. The visitor.; 
had played the game three years, but were unable to score. The 
team was made up of A. D. Baxter, captain; George Gammons, 
John Widell, Thomas Whall, Manuel Dingle, W. G. Hunt, man- 
ager. Substitutes: Cosman, Collins and Shanahan. Game-^ 
won, 20; lost, 6. 

BASKET BALL 
1903-1904 

Again Company A put on the floor a team that won the Mil- 
itary Championship and also that of the state. The team re- 
ceived a silver cup which is now in the trophy room of the Ar- 
mory. Competition was not strong enough around home and 
as it was hard to arrange games, they had to play such teams as 
Dartmouth College, Fall River Signal Corps, and St. Johnsbur>, 
Vt., which were the leading teams in the country at that time. 
The team lost one game in the league series and won 9, also won 
16 games outside of the league. Games lost 3; games won 25. 

The team comprised J. M. Widell, captain ; George Gammons, 
Richard Collins, William Kelley, Clarence Legg; substitutes, An- 
drew McFadden, Richard Cosman, (Walter G. Hunt, manager). 



Co. A Basket- 
ball Team, 1902 

Left to right: 
Pvt. Arthur Sul- 
livan, Pvt. Har- 
ry Godfrey; Sit- 
ting, left to 
right : William 
Burbine (Mgr.), 
Pvt. Paul W. 
Mortimer, Pvt. 
Roy A. Barstow, 
Ci)l. A. D. Bax- 
ter 




Co. A Basket- 
ball Team 
1904 - 1905 

Lower rovvr, left 
to right : Pvt. 
Richard Cos- 
man, Pvt. Wil- 
liam Kelley; up- 
per row : Pvt. 
Edward Dulong, 
Pvt. Richard 
Collins, Sgt. 
Walter G. Hunt 
(Mgr.), Pvt. 
Thomas Whall, 
Pvt. Andrew Mc- 
Fadden 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

1905-1906 
Team was as follows: G. Gammons, A. McFadden, Thom.ar 
Whall, W. Kelley, Clarence Legg, P. Reynolds, manager. Sub- 
stitutes, P. Mortimer, E. Dulong, R. Cosman. Games won 20; 
lost 10. 

1909 

In 1906-1907-1908 Company A was forced to give up the 
game because it could not get teams to play them and T. Whall, A. 
McFadden, John Widell and E. Dulong joined the Reading Y. M. 
C. A. In the same year Company G of Gloucester claimed the 
military championship of the state. J. H. Keough of Co. A is- 
sued a challenge to Company G to defend the title and a three 
game series was arranged and again the Company won the cham- 
pionship of the state. The scores — Company A 31, Company G 
28; Company A 32, Company G 48; Company A 17, Company G 
13. The rivalry was so intense at these games that the big crov/ds 
were kept on edge every minute. 

The team was as follows: J. Widell, captain; Paul Mortimer. 
William Kelley, A. King and Bergstrom. The last two wore 
members of Company A, but resided in Winchester, Mass. 

1914 

After his election in the latter part of this year, Capt. Connel- 
ly decided to take up athletics in the company as a means of bring- 
ing in new recruits and holding the interest of the older men. 
Together with his lieutenants, plans were worked out for the com- 
ing year to take up basket ball, relay racing, sprints, and military 
games. 

Wooden banks were built by Henry E. Feindel for the cor- 
ners on the armory floor, to be used in relay and distance running, 
and the new basket ball equipment was purchased. Candidates 
for the various teams were selected and practise started under 
John M. Widell, a former basket ball star who soon developed two 
line teams. The wonderful success of these teams was due to the 
hard coaching of Mr. Widell which kept the players in good con- 
dition, and the selection of opponents that made the teams extenci 
themselves. 

Later, several athletic meets were held which brought out 
some very good track men. Prizes were offered to stimulate the 
efforts of these athletes, who furnished a number of interesting 
contests. 

208 



I If 11:111 II 



Co. A, 6th Mass. 
Inf., N.G., Track 
Team, 1915-1916 

Left to right : 
Pvt. Melburn N. 
Harlow, Pvt. 
.Tohn H. Beebe, 
Jr., Pvt. Roy H. 
Wright, Pvt. 
Thomas F. Cor- 
coran, Pvt. .las. 
G. Brown, Cpl. 
Thos. .T. Quinn 



Co. A Basket- 
ball 2nd Team 
1916 

Sitting, left to 
Tight: Pvt. Ed- 
ward M. Fay, 
Pvt. John A. 
Doucette, Pvt. 
Arthur T. 
Walsh, Pvt. Geo. 
B. Heustis, Pvt. 
George A. Bur- 
rage; Standing, 
left to right : 
Widell (coach), 
2d Lt. Edgar B. 
Hawkes (Mgr.), 
Cpl. Thomas .1. 
Quinn. 




Co. A Basket- 
ball 1st Team 
1915 - 1916 

Sitting, left to 
right : Pvt. John 
H. Beebe, Jr. 
(Capt.), Pvt. 
Brent M. Edgar, 
Pvt. Roy H. 
AV r i g h t, Pvt. 
Thos. F. Corcor- 
an, Pvt. Chas. E. 
Creedon ; Stand- 
ing: Pvt. Harry 
E. Nelson, John 
M. Widell 
(coach), 2nd Lt. 
Edgar B, 

Hawkes (Mgr.), 
Pvt. Melburn N. 
Harlow 



History Of Richardson L. ight Guard 

All these events created enthusiasm and brought to the- 
company a number of clean young men who became excellent sol- 
diers. 

Mr. Widell, a true sportsman, gave freely of his time and 
knowledge without recompense other than the satisfaction of 
turning out winning teams and of helping the company to main- 
tain a high standard. 

During his administration, Capt. Connelly and officers gave 
much assistance to the school authorities in furthering high school 
athletics. 




A Group of Athletic Prizes Won by Co. A 

Lower Eow, left to right: July 31, 1915, 1st Prize Eelay Eace; 
Eelay Eace at Framingham, 1910, won by Priv. M. T. Burns; 
Squad Drill by Company A, April 23, 1909; Upper Eow, left to 
right: Basketball, Wakefield vs. Stoneham, won by Co. A, 1917; 
Town Championship Bowling, 1909-1910; Surburban Military 
League, 1903-1904, won by Co. A 

1915-1916 
After a lapse of six years. Company A organized a team 
again, won 22 games, lost 8, and was second in the military league. 
The team was made up as follows: R. H. Wright, captain; J. H. 
Beebe, Jr., M. Harlow, H. E. Nelson, C. E. Creedon, T. F. Cor- 
coran, B. M. Edgar, J. Widell, coach; E. Hawkes, manager. 

210 



History Of Richardson Light Guaru 

The intense rivalry between the teams resulted in hard play- 
ing with plenty of excitement, which had the effect of attracting 
a large attendance and keeping up the interest. Most of the 
games were played at Company A armory. 

A second team was also developed which usually played 
visiting teams on the nights the first team played, and which 
furnished in their class basket ball as interesting as the first team. 

1915 

ATHLETICS 

February 19. Under the auspices of Company A, the Wake- 
field High School held an athletic meet in the armory. The 
■Company A relay team comprising Privates Brown, Corcoran, C. 
Creedon and McLaughlin defeated a fast team from Company D, 
9th Regiment of Boston in the mile race. A thirty yard dash for 
members of these teams resulted in a win for Company A, Privates 
Corcoran and Brown winning first and second places respectively. 
Athletes from the local Y. M. C. A. performed creditably. There 
was an attendance of about five hundred persons. 

March, 1915. Company A and Company H of the 6th regi- 
ment met in a tournament March 12 and March 31. The events 
were basketball, bowling, rifle shooting, relay race, thirty-yard 
dash, pool, checkers, whist and cribbage. Company A won 28 
to 20, the bowling and relay teams scoring most of the points. 
Each team donated a sum of money for the purchase of a trophy. 
After each meet the companies enjoyed a collation. This first 
meet was held in Stoneham and the second in Wakefield, each town 
sending a big delegation of "rooters". There was considerable 
rivalry of a friendly nature. Sergt. John T. Murray of Company 
A led in the indoor shooting. 

"A DAY IN CAMP." 

April 26. "A Day in Camp" was presented for the entertain- 
ment of a large number of friends and Fine Members by the com- 
panies. A company street of shelter tents was pitched on wood 
frames in center of drill hall. The company marched from out- 
-doors with field equipment and camp routine was gone through. 

211 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Call to quarters, taps, first call, reveille, setting-up drill, breaking: 
camp, bayonet exercises, extended order drill, and attack, formed 
part of the program. 

Athletic events then followed — thirty-yard dash for members- 
won by Corcoran; relay race between juniors and freshmen of the 
high school to decide a dead heat at a previous meet, bayonet fenc- 
ing by team from Company C, 8th Regiment; a relay race between 
Company A, 6th Infantry, and Company K, 8th Infantry of Som- 
erville, who claimed military relay championship of state, was won- 
by Company A in fast time (Privates Corcoran, C. Creedon, 
Brown, McLaughlin). Private Burrage and C. A. Doucette fur- 
nished a tin cup fight blindfolded. The 880-yard run was won 
b}' Privates McLaughlin, Brown second. A blank cartridge race,, 
similar to a potato race in which the cartridges had to be loaded 
into a rifle and last one fired, furnished a thrill. This was won 
by Musician Cheever. 

The audience voted this "Day in Camp" a most enjoyable- 
and novel affair. 

July 5. At Lowell during the celebration. Private James G. 
Brown won the half mile run and the relay team won second place- 
not being in best of condition after the two days' camp. 

August 12. During the athletic events at camp, Private- 
Brown won first place in half mile run (up) and Private W. L.- 
Wenzel won third prize in shot put. 



1916-1917 

Team won 28 and lost 4 games. 
Team members: J. H. Beebe, Jr., captain; H. Nelson, M. Har- 
low, C. Creedon, R. Luken, T. Corcoran, R. Wright, J. Widell, 
coach; Lt. Rogers, manager. This team also won series from 
Company H, 6th Regiment of Stoneham, Mass., and a silver cup^ 
which is now in trophy room in armory. 

A second team composed of George D. Sargent, John A. Dou- 
cette, Arthur T. Walsh, Roy Luken, Thomas J. Quinn, Edward M.. 
Fay, George B. Heustis, George A. Burrage, played throughout 
the season — winning most of their games. 

212 




Co. A, First Team Basket Ball, 1916 - 1917 









. F.MuLerre, 





^tnR/J/? 



2nd Team, Basketball, Co. K, 101st. Inf., 1919 - 1920 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

1918 
After Company A reached the Southern camps when the 
weather became warmer, a team was formed comprising some of 
the old players under John M. Widell and defeated all the basket 
ball teams in the camp of which there were some very strong ag- 
gregations. 

1919-1920 
After the war the new Company took up the game again and 
won 26 and lost 6 games. Team was as follows: R. Wright, 
captain; C. Creedon, T. Gibbons, R. Luken, H. Mortimer, A 
Flint, J. Widell, coach; Lt. Brown, manager. 

March, 1921 
In the athletic meet Company K team won the relay race. 
The team was composed of Lt. Brown, Lt. Beebe, Private Harlow 
and Private Reardon. They were awarded a very valuable cup 
for this victory and also gained one leg on another cup which will 
remain on competition for three years. Lt. Brown also won the 
quarter mile race. 



215 



CHAPTER EIGHTEEN 
RIFLE SHOOTING OF THE RICHARDSON LIGHT GUARD 

Rifle shooting iias always played a very important part in the 
history of the Richardson Light Guard. To the pioneers in the 
early eighties who overcame unsurmountable obstacles for the 
sheer love of the game and formed the foundation of such a re- 
markable career, the bulk of the credit should go. 

Conditions now are somewhat different. The best of equip- 
ment is available. Every armory has a splendid indoor range. 
Ammunition is furnished free of charge and there is plenty of it. 

Compare these advantages with the home made contrivances 
and equipment which were used some forty years ago, inadequate 
ranges, ammunition made at the armory and purchased by the 
members of the team, lack of proper transportation to and from 
the outdoor range, which was constructed mostly by the members 
of the company, and you will readily see that unless these splendid 
types of riflemen loved the sport, Wakefield would not enjoy the 
unequalled reputation in rifle work that is rightfully hers. 

As this history covers from 1901 to date (1926), it perhaps 
would be well to tell in a brief way about some of the hard fought 
victories before the beginning of this epoch. 

Although the first match on record shot between the mem- 
bers of the Richardson Light Guard took place on October 27, 
1853, there was no active work with the rifle until the year 1875. 
In October of that year the Massachusetts Volunteer Rifle Associa- 
tion was formed and the first military rifle competition held in the 
state was shot at South Framingham on the camp grounds, Nov- 
ember 17th, under their auspices. Annual competitions were held 
under the direction of this Association until 1880, when the state 
assumed control. 

In 1879 Company A stood at the head of the entire state mil- 
itia in rifle work, not only won first prize, the Peabody Trophy, 
but broke all existing records with a score of 103 out of a possible 
J 25, the conditions being five men, five shots offhand, 200 yards. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

From then on, the Richardson Light Guard was up with the 
leaders, winning the majority of the matches and receiving many 
handsome trophies which are now safely kept at the armory. 

In 1889 the Company took all honors even defeating a team 
containing many crack shots who had just returned from rep- 
resenting the United States abroad. However, in 1890 the first 
regimental competition was held which was won by the Richard- 
son Light Guard. This victory started a record of consecutive 
wins which has never been equalled or surpassed by any military 
unit in existence. From 1890 until 1906 Company A did not 
know defeat in the Regimental Matches, winning first place year 
after vear. 




statuette "La Chasse" 

1st Prize, Middlesex Military 
League, 1901 



In 1907 the Rifle team of Company A again won the Regi- 
mental Championship but in the three years that followed, due 
to new men coming to the team, they relinquished the lead. 

In the year 1911 again saw Company A at the top, not con- 
tent with the first place, but broke all records with a score of 649. 
The highest score up to that time was 645 also held by Com- 
pany A. This same year in the shoot for the winning company 
teams in each regiment. Company A again won first place winning, 

217 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

the State trophy, with a splendid score of 673 out of a possible 
750. Ten men shooting five shots each at 200, 500 and 600 yds. 
As conditions changed in after years this score still remains as 
the record over this course. 

The Richardson Light Guard in the years to follow won the 
Regimental shoot every year. In 1916 on account of the Mex- 
ican Border affair, the regimental competition was not held. 

The success of the company team under Capt. Gray was con- 
tinued under Capt. McMahon and his officers, who gave much at- 
tention to indoor shooting, which in a large degree trained a num- 
ber of men preliminary to the outdoor work. 

As the years went on conditions governing the matches grew 
harder and the competition keener, but still Co. A went forward 
taking green men, training and developing them into steady fine 
shooting members. 

Under Capt. Connelly the company still forged ahead until 
the war stopped the winning streak of a truly remarkable shooting 
company. 

The next year the World War took place, but on the forming 
of the new Richardson Light Guard, the rifle practice was renewed 
and again the Wakefield company was victorious. 

There were many rifle matches other than the Regimental 
competition that were won by the splendid shots of Company A, 
a complete record of which will be found in this chapter. 




1901 State Trophy 

Capture of a French Battery by 52nd Regt. 
at "Waterloo 

218 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

REGIMENTAL COMPETITION OCTOBER 14, 1901 

The Regimental Match was held at Lexington on October 14, 
1901. Company A won with a record breaking score. 

The conditions called for teams of 15 men firing 15 shots at 
200 yards. 

Company A made a fine total of 975 beating the best pre- 
vious score made by Company G 5th Regt. Inf., of Woburn by 
five points. 

Company C of Lowell was second score 945 and Company 
I of Concord third, score 862. 
The score: 

Pvt. G. W. Reid 69 

Bug. S. Bourgeois 68 

Lt. 1. H. McMahon 67 

Pvt: G. W. Chesley 66 

Pvt. G. M. Jefts 66 

Corp. W. G. Hunt 66 

Capt. F. E. Gray 65 

Corp. R. A. Merrill 65 

Pvt. J. I. Cronin 65 

Lt. E. E. Morrison 65 

Sgt. J. I-L Keough 64 

Pvt. R. E. Gibson 63 

Pvt. C. A. Coombs 63 

Sgt. W. 1. Sweetser 62 

Corp. M. Dingle 61 

Team total 975 

Pvt. George W. Reid was high man in the entire regiment 
and was awarded first prize. Bugler Samuel Bourgeois won thirci 
prize. 

The company was awarded the State Prize which was an en- 
graving entitled "Capture of a French Battery by the 52nd Regt. 
at Waterloo. 

The Sixth Regiment team won the "Tri Color" in the State 
Shoot, nine out of fifteen of the team being Company A men as 
follows: O. M. Sgt. Keough, Lt. E. E. Morrison, Lt. J. H. Mc- 
Mahon and Pvts. R. E. Gibson, G. W. Reid, W. R. Murphy, G. 
M. Jefts, Chester Combs and G. W. Chesley. 

Cups were won by Lt. Morrison and Pvt. Murphy and medals 
by Lt. Morrison, Pvts. .Murphy, Coombs and Jefts. 

REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, SEPTEMBER 22, 1902 

Company again kept their record of consecutive records in- 
tact by winning the Regimental shoot at Walnut Hill, on Sep- 
tember 22, 1902. 

219 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Conditions called for teams of fifteen men to shoot ten shots 
for record at 200 3/ards. Company A's score was 645 defeating 
Company C of Lowell by 36 points. 
The score: 

Pvt. W. R. Murphv 49 

Bug. G. W. Chesley 47 

Corp. W. G. Hunt 46 

Pvt. G. W. Reid 46 

Sgt. J. H. Keough 45 

Pvt. R. E. Gibson 45 

Pvt. G. M. Jefts 43 

Pvt. S. Bourgeois 43 

Pvt. B. C. Dean 42 

Pvt. C. A. Coombs 41 

Sgt. W. I. Sweetser 41 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 40 

Corp. M. Dingle 39 

Pvt. J. J. Cronin 39 

Lt. A. R, Sedgley 39 

Team total 645 



]iiM$^- 




1902 State Trophy 

"La Platriere" 

1st Prize Eegt. Competition 

Won by Company A 



Pvt. William R. Murphy was high man in the regiment mak- 
ing the remarkable score of 49 out of a possible 50 points. 

For their prize Company A was presented with an engraving 
entitled "La Platriere". 

Q. M. Sgt. and Pvt. G. M. Jefts won places on the State Team 
this year. 



220 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
REGIMENTAL MATCH, SEPTEMBER 21, 1903 

The rifle team of the Richardson Light Guard demonstrated 
their superiority as military marksmen by winning for the four- 
teenth consecutive time the state trophy at the regimental shoot 
of the Sixth Infantry, held at Walnut Hill. 

The conditions called for ten men, 10 shots at 200 yards. 
Captain John H. McMahon led his team to victory with the fme 
score of 45 out of a possible 50, and Pvt. George W. Raid won a 
regimental medal. 




1903 State Trophy 

Combat Sur Une Voie Ferree 



Below are the members of the team and scores: 



Capt. John H. McMahon 

Pvt. George W. Reid 
Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough 
Pvt. Robert Gibson 
Bugler George W. Chesle}' 
Pvt. Samuel Bourgeois 
Pvt. Joshua D. Upton 
Lt. Alton R. Sedgley 
Corp. J. J. Cronin 
Sgt. Walter G. Hunt 



45 
44 
44 
43 
42 
42 
41 
41 
41 
40 

423 



Total score 

The state prize won by Company A was an engraving "Com- 
.bat sur une Voie Ferree". 



221 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

THE STATE GENERAL COMPETITION, 1903 

At Walnut Hill range on October 1st the team of the Sixth 
Infantry won the tri color, the emblem of supremacy among the 
foot troops of the M. V. M. by a record breaking score. 

Company A was well represented by having seven members 
on the team. The order called for teams of fifteen men and con- 
ditions were ten shots each at 500 and 600 yards. 

The representatives of Company A and their scores were as 
follows : 

Q. M. Sergt. James H. Keough, 92; Corp. J. J. Cronin, 90; 
Pvt. "Joshua D. Upton, 87; Bugler George H. Chesley, 84; Pvt. 
George W. Reid, 85 ; Pvt. Robert E. Gibson, 82 and Sergt. Walter 
G. Hunt, 78. 

Q. M. Sgt. Keough was the second highest in the competition 
and Corp. J. J. Cronin won the decoration of a Distinguished 
Marksman. Sergt. Keough and Corp. Cronin won places on the 
State Team. 

The following men of Company A shot on the State Team at 
Sea Girt, N. J., this year. Q. M. Sgt. Keough, Bug. Chesley, Pvts. 
Reid and Upton. 




1904 State Trophy 

Won by Company A 
"Battle of Concord" 



REGIMENTAL MATCH, SEPTEMBER 19, 1904 
The annual competition of the Sixth Regiment Infantry was 
held for the first year at the Bay State Military Rifle Association 
range commonly known as the Wakefield Range. 

Twelve teams reported for the contest which was won by 
Company A, Richardson Light Guard for the fifteenth consecutive 
time. 

222 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Conditions called for ten shots, 200 yards for ten men. Com- 
pany A's score was 417. The nearest competitor being Company 
B of Fitchburg with a score of 385. 

This gear's match was of more than usual interest owing to 
the fact that the troops used the U. S. Magazine Rifle Cal. .30. 
It is also the same rifle that is in use today and commonly called 
the Springfield rifle. 

Below are the scores of Company A, the victors. 

Pvt. George W. Reid 44 

Pvt. Samuel Burgeois 44 

Pvt. R. E. Gibson 43 

Q. M. Sgt. James H Keough 43 

1st Sgl. E. j. Connelly 42 

Sgt. B. C. Dean 41 

Bugler G. W. Cheslev 41 

Sgt. W. G. Hunt 41 

Lt. A. R. Sedgley . 39 

Capt. J. H. McMahon . 39 

Total score 4 1 7 

Company A received as State Prize a beautiful engraving 
entitled. "The Battle of Concord." 

THE STATE GENERAL COMPETITION, 1904 

The State General Rifle competition this year was held at the 
Bay State Military Rifle Range on Oct. 1st. 

The Sixth Regiment was victorious and Company A was rep- 
resented by five members. 

Conditions called for teams for fifteen members firing two 
shots each at 500 and 600 yards. 

The following men represented Company A on the Sixth 
Regiment team. 

Q. M. Sergt. James H. Keough, 82; Bugler George W. Ches- 
ley, 81 ; Pvt. Samuel Bourgeois, 80; Pvt. George W. Reid, 80; and 
Cpl. J.J. Cronin, 74. 

The Company was represented at the National Matches by 
Q. M. Sgt. Keough, Corp. Cronin, Bug. Chesley, Pvt. Bourgeois 
and Pvt. Reid. 

REGIMENTAL MATCH, SEPTEMBER 25, 1905 
Again for the sixteenth consecutive time the Richardson 
Light Guard won the State Prize at the annual competition of 
the Sixth Regiment Infantry. 

Conditions were changed this year. The teams were com- 
posed of ten men shooting five shots each at 200, 300 and 500 
yards, one sighting shot allowed at each range. 

223 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Company A put up a fine score of 607, second and third 
places going respectively to Company C of Lowell with a score of 
577 and Company 1 of Concord, score 529. 

Below are a list of the team and their scores: 





200 yds 


300 yds 


500 yds 


Total 


Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keoygh 


21 


20 


25 


66 


Pvt. G. W. Chesley 


21 


21 


23 


65 


Pvt. R. E. Barstow 


21 


20 


23 


64 


Pvt. S. Bourgeois 


21 


19 


21 


61 


Capt. J. H. McMahon 


20 


18 


22 


60 


Sgt. W. G. Hunt 


72 


19 


19 


60 


Pvt. R. M. Gibson 


21 


19 


19 


59 


Pvt. G. W. Reid 


23 


20 


16 


59 


Sgt. E. 1. Connelly 


17 


18 


23 


58 


Sgt. B. C. Dean 


18 


20 


17 


55 
607 



>-. iffr '.^ :«. - :j',-«f»:?^ ;-4^?V"'«?&3 




1905 State Trophy 

Sherman's March to the Sea 



The first prize was an engraving, "Sherman's March to the 
Sea." 

Q. M. Sgt. Keough and Pvt. Chesley were members of the 
State Team at the National Matches. 



REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, 1906 

For the first time in seventeen years Company A was forced 
to relinquish the State prize in the Regimental Competition, held 
at the Wakefield Flange. 

Company H of Stoneham won first place with a score of 633 
defeating Company A by one point. 

224 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Conditions called for teams of ten men to shoot one sighting 
and five shots for record at 200, 300 and 500 yards. 

The score: 

Pvt. J. D. Upton 68 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 67 

Pvt. J. J. Cronin 65 

Sgt. F. H. Rogers 65 

Pvt. R. E. Gibson 64 

Pvt. George Durward 63 

Pvt. R. E. Barstow 63 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 60 

Pvt. B. C. Dean 59 

Sgt. E. J. Connelly 58 

Team total 632 

Pvt. Joshua D. Upton was high man in the regiment and was 
awarded the National Rifle Association Medal. Q. M. Sgt. James 
H. Keough won third prize. 

This year the Tri Color was again won by the Sixth Regi- 
ment. Sgt. Keou.gh of Company A was a member of the team. 

Sgt. Keough also shot on the State Team in the National 
Matches. 

REGIMENTAL MATCH, SEPTEMBER 30, 1907 

Having tasted defeat by Company H, of Stoneham last year 
in the Sixth Regim.ent competition and incidentally after sixteen 
consecutive wins, the members of Company A rifle team resolved 
to again head the regiment. Their efforts were rewarded in full, 
for they not only won the match but made the record score 645 
which stood until 1911 when broken again by themselves. 

That the team was enabled to roll up such a grand total was 
due in a great measure to the splendid ammunition which was 
used. This was hand loaded by Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough and 
was noted for its accuracy. 

Below are the men and scores of Company A: 

200 yds 300 yds 500 yds Total 



Art. H. H. Foster 


21 


23 


23 


67 


Lt. E. J. Connelly 


22 


23 


22 


67 


Corp. J. T. Barton 


20 


21 


25 


66 


Capt. J. H. McMahon 


21 


20 


24 


65 


Pvt. G. W. Reid 


21 


21 


23 


65 


Sgt. F. H. Rogers 


21 


19 


24 


64 


Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 


20 


22 


22 


64 


Pvt. J. D. Upton 


20 


20 


23 


63 


Pvt. J. I. Cronin 


21 


20 


21 


62 


Pvt. R. E. Gibson 


21 


22 


19 


62 



645 
225 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The trophy this year was an engraving entitled, "Attack on 
Ft. Sumpter by Admiral Dupont, April 7, 1863." 

The Tri-color was won again by the Sixth Regiment, Com- 
pany A being represented on the team by Q. M. Sgt. Keough and 
Pvt. Upton. 

Pvt. Upton represented the company at the National Matches. 



4^ ' '^ 



1907 State Trophy 

Attack of Ironclads by Admiral Dupont 
on Fort Sumter, 1863 



INDOOR MATCH COMPANY A, 6TH REGT. VS COMPANY 
M, 5TH REGT. OF HUDSON, MASS. 

1907 

A series of indoor matches were arranged with Company M, 
5th Regiment of Hudson, Mass., under the following conditions. 
Teams to consist of fifteen men, each man to fire one sighting shot 
and ten record shots on the one quarter inch German ring target, 
at a distance of sixty feet. There were three matches, one off 
hand, one sitting and one prone. Company A used 22 caliber 
Winchester single shot rifles with ordinary open sporting sights 
and Company M used a 22 caliber Winchester with the U. S. 
Magazine Rifle model of 1898 open sight. The targets were ex- 
changed by mail. 

The results were as follows: 

226 



History Of Richardson light uuaku 

Offhand stage, April 18, 1907 

Company A, 6th Regt score :)W) 

Company M, 5th Regt score 3207 

Sitting stage, April 25, 1907 

Company A, 6th Regt score 3509 

Company M, 5th Regt score 3332 

Prone Stage, May 2, 1907 

Company A, 6th Regt score 3529 

Company M, 5th Regt score 3346 

Company A won the series by a total score of 10441 to Com- 
pany M's score of 9885. 

The scores of the five highest men were as follows: 
Q. M. Sergt. James 1! Keough 719 

Pvt. John T. Barton 714 

Sgt. Edgar B. Hawkeb 706 

Sgt. Fred H. Rogers 704 

Corp. Harold H. Foster 701 

COMPANY TEAM MATCH NO. 1 
NEW ENGLAND MILITARY RIFLE ASSOCIATION 

Two teams from Company A were entered in the Company 
Team Match No. 1 at the Wakefield range on July 23, 1907. 

The conditions called for teams of five men, each man to fire 
two sighting shots and seven shots for record at 200 and 500 
yards. 

The first team finished third and the second team in sixth 
place. There were twenty-two teams entered in this match. 
Company A, First Team 
Pvt. J. J. Cronin ... 64 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 62 

Pvt. G. W. Reid ... 60 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 60 

Pvt. R. E. Gibson ... 58 

Total score 304 
Company A, Second Team 

Sgt. F. H. Rogers 64 

Sgt. W. G. Hunt 62 

Corp. J. T. Barton 61 

Lt. E. J. Connelly 56 

Art. H. H. Foster 56 

Total score 299 

FIRST CORPS OF CADETS MATCH 

Company A entered two teams in the First Corps of Cadets 
match at the meeting of the New England Military Rifle Associ- 
ation. This match was held at the Bay State Military Associa- 

227 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

tion Range at Wakefield, Tuesday, July 28, 1908. The first team 
of Company A won the match with a splendid score of 316 gaining 
their first leg on this splendid trophy which now is carefully 
guarded in our Armory. 

Conditions for this match called for teams of five men to 
fire seven shots each at 200 and 500 yards. 

In order to obtain permanent ownership of the trophy it 
must be won three times. 

The first team score is as follows: 

200 yds 500 yds Total 



Pvt. George W. Reid 


31 


34 


65 


Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 


34 


31 


65 


Pvt. j. J. Cronin 


32 


33 


65 


Corp. 1. T. Barton 


29 


34 


63 


Pvt. J' D. Upton 


30 


28 


58 



Total score 316 

Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough won the second cup in the En- 
listed Men's match during this shoot. 

Every member of the above winning team received a silver 
medal. 

INDOOR SHOOTING DURING THE WINTER OF 1907-1908 

Realizing the value of indoor practice Company A arranged 
several indoor matches. 

The first match was between Camp 39, U. S. W. V. of this 
town. The company team was composed of men who had joined 
since the Spanish War. Teams consisted of ten men, each man to 
fire ten shots at three positions, offhand, sitting and prone, on the 
one quarter inch ring German ring target, at a distance of twenty- 
five yards. 

After a spirited match Company A was declared the winner, 
but not before they knew they had a worthy competitor. The 
scores were as follows : 

Company A Camp 39 

Offhand 2198 Offhand 2181 

; Sitting 2326 Sitting 2227 

Prone 2259 Prone 2278 

6783 6686 

The next event was a series of two matches between the Myles 
Standish Rifle Club of Portland, Maine, and Company A. The 
distance twenty yards, Creedmore target, twenty shots per man. 

228 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Company suffered defeat in these two matches by very small mar- 
gins. The scores: 

(company A 881 Myles Standish Club 906 
Company A 888 Myles Standish Club 911 

The match between the Providence Revolver Club of Prov- 
idence, R. I., came next and the Company entered two teams in 
this match. The conditions called for teams of six men, each 
man to fire ten shots offhand, sitting and prone at the German 
ring target at a distance of twenty-five yards. The score : 

Company A Company A Providence Revolver Club 

1st team 2nd team 

Oflhand 1359 1394 1313 

Sitting 1407 1420 1402 

Prone 1425 1435 1409 

4191 4249 1124 

This match as shown by the above scores was won by the 
second team of Company A. 



THE REGIA4ENTAL COMPETITION, 1908 

The annual rifle competition of the Sixth Regiment was held 
at the Bay State Military Rifle Range at Wakefield on September 
28, 1908. 

The conditions called for one sighting shot and five shots for 
record at 200, 300 and 500 yards. The United States Magazine 
Rifle Model of 1903 was used. 

The match was won by Company K of Lowell with a score of 
644. Company A was fourth with a score of 633. 

The score: 

Lieut. E. J. Connelly 69 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 68 

Pvt. J. D. Upton 67 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 65 

Corp. J. T. Barton 65 

Sgt. Fred H. Rogers 64 

Bugler J. M. Widell 63 

Pvt. V/. I. Sweetser 62 

Sgt. Walter G. Hunt 58 

Cook Harold H. Foster 52 

Total score 633 

229 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Capt. McMahon, Lt. Connelly, Sergts. Keough and Rogers-. 
Corp. Barton and Pvt. Upton won places on the "Regimental 
7'hirty" for this year. Company A was unfortunate in loosing. 
Pvts. Cronin, Gibson and Reid on the Eligibility rule which stipu- 
lated duty at camp, and Sergt. Hawkes who was suddenly called 
away on business. 

This was the second time since the inauguration of the Regi- 
mental Competition that Company A failed to win the State prize. 

In this match Lt. E. J. Connelly won the officers' prize, a cup.. 
The other prizes were awarded to enlisted men only. 



230^ 



CHAPTER NINETEEN 

INDOOR RIFLE MATCH, NATIONAL SPORTSMAN'S SHOW 
HELD IN BOSTON, JANUARY 1909 

Company A sent two teams to compete with the best in Nev/ 
England and both teams finished on top. By winning this match 
the Second Team of Company A became the Indoor Rifle Cham- 
pions of New England. 

The conditions called for teams of five men each, to shoot ten 
shots with the 22 cal. rifle at a distance of 75 feet. The German 
ring target was used. 




1909 N. E. Indoor Champions 

Won by Co. A, Second Team, 

Sportsman's Show, 
Mechanics Blclg., January, 1909 



The scores of both teams: 

Company A Second Team 

Sgt. Fred H. Rogers 234 

Corp. J. T. Barton 234 

Lt. E. J. Connelly 229 

Mus. J. M. Widell 227 

Pvt. J. D. Upton 226 

Total score 1 1 50 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Company A First Team 

0. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 234 

Pvt. G. W. Reid 230 

Cook H. H. Foster 226 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 223 

Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 219 

Total score 1 132 

The Wakefield High School Cadets won third place in the 
School Boy Team Match and Sgt. E. B. Hawkes won fourth place 
in the Military re-entry match and secured a silver cup. 

The Company was presented with shield for winning this 
match. 

FIRST CORPS OF CADETS MATCH 1909 

The rifle team representing Company A won for the second' 
time the First Corps of Cadets Match which was held during the- 
m.eeting of the New England Military Rifle Association at the 
Bay State Rifle Range, Wakefield, on Wednesday, July 28, 1909. 

The conditions were the same as in 1908, teams of five men 
each to fire seven shots each at 200 and 500 yds. 

The score: 





200 yds 


500 yds 


Total 


Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 


32 


35 


67 


Capt. 1. H. McMahon 


30 


35 


65 


Pvt. G. W. Reid 


31 


34 


65 


Lt. E. J. Connelly 


29 


34 


63 


Pvt. J. D. Upton 


28 


32 


60 



Total score 320 

This win gave Company A two wins on the trophy and one 
more win needed to obtain permanent possession. This feat they 
accomplished but not until 1913 at which time they won the 
match again under different conditions by a record score. 

REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, 1909 

The regimental competition for 1909 was held at Wakefield 
Range. 

The conditions were the same as the previous year, ten men 
teams, each man shooting one sighting and five shots for record 
at 200, 300 and 500 yards. 

The match was awarded to Company C of Lowell above the 
protest of Company A. The coach of the Wakefield team noticed 
that the scorer for Company C put down a 4 in place of a 2 and a. 

232 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

5 in place of a 3. Of course this should be mostly the fault of the 
supervising officers in not catching the correct value of the hit 
Company A was positive that an error had occurred that both of 
the targets were taken from the frames and shot for shot figured 
up. The result was a score of 639 for Company A and 635 for 
Company C. However the Chief Range officer ruled against 
Company A and gave the Match to Company C. 

Company A was awarded second place but the feeling was so 
tense they refused to accept it. 

The score: 

Sgt. J. H. Keough 68 

Sgt. F. H. Rogers . 68 

Sgt. W. G. Hunt .... 67 

Lt. E. J. Connelly 66 

Pvt. G. W. Reid 65 

Corp. Harry Godfrey 64 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 64 

Corp. P. W. Mortimer 62 

Pvt. W. 1. Sweetser 60 

Corp. H. H. Foster 55 

Team total 639 

Sgt. Keough and Rogers were tied for high man in the Regi- 
ment but Sgt. Keough's score outranked the total of Sgt. Rogers. 

The following men had the honor of being on the "Regi- 
mental Thirty": 

Sgts. Keough, Rogers and Hunt, Corp. Godfrey, Capt. Mc- 
Mahon, Lt. Connelly and Pvt. Reid. 

Pvt. J. D. Upton shot on the State Team at the National 
matches. 



REGIMENTAL RIFLE COMPETITION, 1910 

The annual rifle competition of the Sixth Regiment Infantry 
was held on Monday, Sept. 26, 1910, on the range of the Bay State 
Military Rifle Association at Wakefield. 

The conditions were teams of ten men, each man to fire one 
sighting shot and five shots for record at 200, 300 and 500 yards. 
Service rifle and an}^ ammunition. The weather conditions were 
perfect. 

233 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The match was won by Company C of Lowell with the fine 
5Core of 645 points equalling the score of Company A in 1907 
which was the record to date. Company A was a close second 
and third place was won by Company H of Stoneham. 




Co. A Rifle Team, 1910 

First Eow, left to right: Pvt. E. J. Muse, Cpl. J. T. Murray, 

Cpl. E. E. Hickey; Middle Eow, left to right: Sgt. E. B. Hawkes, 

1st Lt. E. J. Connelly, Capt. J. H. McMahon, 2nd Lt. F. H. 

Eogers, Pvt. H. H. Foster; Upper Eow, left to right: Sgt. Paul 

W. Mortimer, Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough, Pvt. G. W. Eeid, 

Cpl. W. I. Sweetser 



The score: 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 
Pvt. W. I. Sweetser 

Pvt. E. J. Muse 

Lieut. E. J. Connelly 
Lieut. F. H. Rogers 
Pvt. G. W. Reid 
Cook H. H. Foster 
Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 
Capt. J. H. McMahon 
Corp. P. W. Mortimer 

Total score 



70 
69 
66 
66 
64 
64 
63 
63 
59 
54 

638 



234 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Sgt. J. H. KeoLigh won the medal given by the National Rifle 
Association also first in aggregate for enlisted men, and Pvt. Wal- 
ler 1. Sweetser was second. 

Pvt. Edward J. Muse won second place for enlisted men who 
had never won a state or regimental prize. 

Sgt. Keough won first prize in the Pistol match for Non- 
commissioned Officers. 




1910 Cup — Second Prize 

Eegimental Competition 



The following members of the Company won places on the 
Regimental Thirty: Sgt. Keough, Pvt. W. I. Sweetser, Lt. E. }. 
Connelly, Pvt. E. J. Muse, Lt. F. H. Rogers and Pvt. G. W. Reid. 

Company A was awarded the second prize, a large bronze cup. 

Tri Color was won by the Sixth Regt. Company A had 
three representatives on this team: Lt. Connelly, Sgt. Keough 
and Pvt. Reid. 

Sgt. Keough and Pvt. Reid shot on the State Team in the 
National Matches. 

235 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
FIRST CORPS OF CADETS MATCH, 1911 

The company entered a team in the First Corps of Cadets 
Match at the meeting of the New England Military Rifle Associa- 
tion held on the Bay State Range, July 4, 1911. 

The conditions called for one sighting shot and ten shots for 
record at 200 and 600 yards. Company A team finished second 
in the match, first place going to a team from the First New 
Hampshire Regiment. 

The match was shot under extreme weather conditions, the 
sun shining out of a cloudless sky and the temperature was 115 
degrees F. on the Firing Line. 

Company A score: 

200 yds 600 yds Total 



Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 


44 


45 


89 


Pvt. G. W. Reid 


44 


45 


89 


Corp. E. E. Hickey 


39 


44 


83 


Lieut. E. J. Connelly 


39 


42 


81 


Corp. J. T. Murray 


38 


41 


79 



Total score 421 

The members of the team were presented with bronze medals. 

REGIMENTAL RIFLE COMPETITION, 1911 

The annual rifle competition of the Sixth Regiment was held 
on Monday, October 2, 191 1, on the range of the Bay State Mili- 
tary Rifle Association at Wakefield. 

The conditions were as follows: Teams to consist of ten firing 
members, one sighting shot and five shots for record at 200, .^00 
and 600 yards. U. S. Magazine Rifle and any ammunition were 
used. This was the first time that the 600 yard range was used 
being substituted for the 300 yd. range. 

The weather conditions were not conducive to good scores 
ar 200 yards, there being a chilly wind and the sky was overcast 
with dark clouds, but as the match progressed the conditions great- 
ly improved and at the 600 yard stage they were nearly ideal. 

236 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The match was won by Company A with the fine total of 640 
points, which was also a new range record. 

The scores: 



Lieut. F. H. Rogers 

Pvt. G. W. Reid 
Lieut. E. J. Connelly 
Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 
Pvt. E. J. Muse 
Corp. J. T. Murray 
Q. M. Sgt. J. H Keough 
Corp. E. E. Hickey 
Capt. J. H. McMahon 
Cook H. H. Foster 

Total score 



69 
69 
68 
67 
67 
65 
63 
63 
63 
55 

649 



Company K of Lowell won second place with a score of 623 
and Company C of Lowell was third, their score being 612. 

Lieut. F. H. Rogers won the National Rifle Association medal 
and the special prize for officers. Pvt. G. W. Reid won the first 
prize for enlisted men and Sgt. E. B. Hawkes won sixth prize in 
the same class. 

Company A also had the honor of placing eight out of ten 
men on the Regimental Thirty: Lieuts. Connelly and Rogers, Sgts. 
Keough and Hawkes, Corps. Murray and Hickey and Pvts. Muse 
and Reid. 

Company A was awarded an engraving entitled "All That 
Was Left of Them— Left of 600." 




1911 State Trophy 

All That Was Left of Them-Left of 600 



237 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

STATE COMPETITION, 1911 

The Sixth Regiment again won the Tri Color at the State 
Competition. Company A was represented by Lt. Connelly, Sgt. 
Keough, and Pvt. Reid. Gold medals and also Distinguished 
Marksman's Badges were won by Lt. Connelly and Pvt. Reid and 
Sgt. Keough won a cup. In moving to the 1000 yd. range the 
Sixth Regiment was sixteen points behind the 5th Regt. Owing 
to conditions the match was not completed until the following 
morning. Due to the good shooting of the Company A members 
the Sixth Regiment tied the 5th Regt. with a total score of 2090, 
but by having the largest score at the 1000 yd range they out- 
ranked the 5th and were awarded the Tri Color. 

Sgt. Keough and Reid were members of the State Team at 
the National .Matches. 




1911 State Trophy 

Outdoor Champions. Eecord Seor( 



CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM MATCH, 1911 

Although Company A broke the existing record in the Regi- 
m.ental Competition held on October 2nd of this year they seemed 
to possess new life in the match for the winning companies of the 
different regiments held on October 12, 1911. Perhaps if we were 
to secure all previous records of rifle matches and carefully scan 
them we would not find such a remarkable exhibition of marks- 
manship in the entire United States or even in the world. To 
pick a team of ten men from a militia company and anticipate 
such a score would be unbelievable. 

238 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The conditions were the same as the match shot on October 
2nd, teams of ten members, each man shooting one sighting shot 
and five shots for record at 200, 500 and 600 yds. The weather 
conditions were excellent, the light being good and the wind 
steady. 




Co. A State Rifle Champions, 1911 

Upper Kow, left to right: Pvt. Edward J. Muse, Cpl. John T. 

Murray, Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough, 1st Sgt. Edgar B. Hawkes, 

Pvt. George W. Keid, Cook Harold H. Foster; Centre Eow, left 

to right: Cpl. Edward E. Hiekey, 1st Lt. Edward J. Connelly, 

Capt. John H. McMahon, 2nd Lt. Fred H. Rogers, Cpl. Walter L 

Sweetser; Lower Row, Pvt. Thomas W. Walsh, sub., Pvt. 

Richard M. Dwyer, sub. 

Note: Richard M. Dwyer, a Lieutenant, was killed in action in France 

during the World War. 



At the close of the 200 yard stage Company A led the field 
with a total of 212 being 21 points ahead of its nearest competitor. 
Co. B 2nd Regt. The team shot a fine total at 500 yards and the 
total after that stage stood Co. A. 447, Company B 414. It 
was evident that with good shooting at 600 yards the match was 

239 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

won by Company A and it only required a total of 202 points at 
that range to equal our record at the Regimental Shoot. 

By very even and brilliant shooting at 600 yards Company A 
made a total of 226 and won the 1911 Championship Company 
Team Match with the magnificent total of 673 or 67.3 average per 
man. 

The score: 

Pvt. G. W. Reid 
Lieut. E. J. Connelly 
Capt. J. H. McMahon 
Lieut. F. H. Rogers 
Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 
Pvt. E. J. Muse 
Corp. E. E. Mickey 
Corp. J. T. Murray 
Corp. W. I. Sweetser 
Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 

212 235 226 673 

Company B, 2nd Regt. Infantr}^ finished second with a score 
of 626 and Company H, 8th Regt. Infantry third, their score being 
618. 

The excellent scores of the team in this match and in the Reg- 
imental match of Oct. 2 were due in a large part to the coaching 
of the team captain, Lieut. E. J. Connelly. 



200 


500 


600 


Total 


23 


24 


25 


72 


24 


25 


21 


70 


22 


25 


T> 


69 


23 


22 


23 


68 


21 


23 


23 


67 


22 


23 


■^2 


67 


17 


25 


24 


66 


19 


24 


22 


65 


21 


22 


22 


65 


20 


22 


22 


64 




1912 Preliminary Gallery 
Competition, 6th Regt. 

Won by Company A 

240 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On the evening of March 14, 1912 the annual indoor match 
of the Sixth Regiment was held. The conditions called for every 
enlisted man to fire one sighting shot and five shots for record on 
the M. V. M. gallery target. The distance was seventy-five yards, 
22 cal. rifles. The best forty scores to count. The Company 
won the match with a very good score and was awarded a silver 
cup. 

The first forty men and their scores: 



Corp. Sweetser 


24 


Sgt. Findlay 


20 


Corp. Hickey 


24 


Pvt. Logan 


19 


Sgt. A. D. Baxter 


24 


Pvt. Shannahan 


19 


Pvt. Muse .. 


2: 


Pvt. Dwyer 


10 


Pvt. J. H. O'Neill 


y\ 


Pvt. Shea 


19 


Sgt. flawkes 


13 


Pvt. Lane . 


18 


Pvt. Martin 


23 


Sgt. Farnham 


IS 


Q. M. Sgt. Keough 


2- 


Art. Sullivan 


18 


Corp. Murray 


2^ 


Corp. Evans 


18 


Pvt. T. W. Walsh 


22 


Pvt. Fowler 


17 


Pvt. Santos 


22 


Sgt. Stark 


17 


Cook Foster 


9[ 


Pvt. Oliver 


16 


Pvt. Burns 


?\ 


Cook Hubbard 


16 


Pvt. Curriei 


21 


Pvt. Wrenn 


16 


Pvt. Stevens 


21 


Pvt. Morse 


16 


Mus. W. E. Findlay 


2(> 


Pvt. Fames 


16 


Pvt. Downes 


20 


Pvt. LeGoff 


15 


Pvt. Roach 


20 


Pvt. Findlay 


11 


Pvt. Glynn . 


20 


Corp. Qualters 


11 


Pvt. Paon . 


^0 


Pvt. Stone 


6 



Total score 763 points 

This win entitled the company to participate in the shoot off 
for winning companies in the various regiments. 

The officers were not allowed to shoot in this match. 




1912 State Trophy 

Indoor Championship. 
Co. A, 6th Inf., N. G. 

241 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On April 1, 1912 the company again was called upon to de- 
fend their title as indoor champions of the State. The conditions 
were the same as the match shot on March 14th, namely one 
sighting shot and five shots for record with the 22 cal. rifle distance 
75 feet. 

Company A not only bettered their previous record but de- 
feated all competitors by rolling up a fine total of 788 points. 

The men representing Company A and their scores were as 
follows : 



Sgt. Keough 24 

Pvt. Burns 23 

Pvt. Currier 23 

Corp. Hickey 22 

Cook Hubbard 22 

Sgt. Farnham 22 

Mus. W. E. Findlay 22 

Pvt. Muse 

Sgt. J. Findlay, Jr. 

Corp. Murray 

Pvt. Fowler 

Art. Sullivan 

Pvt. Roach 

Pvt. Martin 

Pvt. Hannaford 



Pvt. 


Dwyer 


Pvt. 


Paon 


Pvt. 


O'Neill 


Sgt. 


Baxter 


Pvt. 


Oliver 




Total 



Pvt. Santos 20 

Corp. Sweetser 20 

Mus. J. W. Findlay 19 

Cook Foster 19 

Pvt. Wrenn 19 

Pvt. Phelan 19 

Pvt. Walsh 19 

Pvt. Stevens 19 

Pvt. Wood 19 

Corp. Evans 19 

Sgt. Stark 19 

Pvt. Fames 19 

Corp. Creedon 18 

Pvt. Morse 16 

Pvt. Glynn 16 

Pvt. J. C. O'Neill 16 

Pvt. LeGoff 16 

Pvt. P. W. Findlay 16 

Pvt. Mayers 15 

Pvt. Logan 15 

788 points 



For the State Prize Company A was awarded an oak shield 
with a silver plate. 

The officers were also barred from shooting in this match. 

FIRST CORPS OF CADETS MATCH, 1912 

As in past years Company A entered a team in the First Corps 
of Cadets Match held at the meeting of the New England Military 
Rifle Association, on August 22, 1912. 

The conditions were as in previous years, teams of five men 
each member to shoot two sighting shots and ten shots for record 
at 200 and 600 yards. 

Company A team finished in third position with a score of 
428, each member of the team being presented with a suitable-r 
bronze medal. 



242 



600 


Total 


48 


92 


43 


86 


41 


84 


40 


84 


42 


82 


428 points 





History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Company C of the First Corps won the match with a score oi 
434, outranking Company E of the 5th Regt., who put up the 
same total. 

The men representing Co. A and their scores: 

200 
Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough 44 

Pvt. Edward J. Muse 43 

Lt. E. J. Connelly 43 

Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 44 

Corp. E. E. Hickey 40 

Team total 

THE REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, 1912 

The annual rifle competition of the Sixth Regiment was held 
or September 19, 1912 at the Wakefield Range. Conditions were 
the same as past years, teams of ten men, to shoot one sighting 
shot and five shots for record at 200, 500 and 600 yards. 

The weather conditions were very good and Company A won 
the match, the nearest company being forty points behind. 
The score: 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 73 

Corp. W. 1. Sweetser 69 

Sgt. E. B. Hawker 69 

Lieut. E. J. Connelly 66 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 65 

Lieut. F. H. Rogers 64 

Corp. J. T. Murray 63 

Corp. E. E. Hickey 62 

Pvt. E. J. Muse 60 

Cook H. H. Foster 48 

Total score 639 




1912 State Trophy 
"1815" 



243 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Second prize was won by Company K of Lowell with a score- 
of 599 and third prize by Company H of Stoneham score 594. 

Q. M. Sgt. Keough established a record at this shoot by mak- 
ing 73 out of a possible 75. This record was never equalled and 
as the conditions changed the following year this record still 
stands. 

Corp. Walter I. Sweetser and Sgt. Edgar Brooks Hawkes won- 
second and third prizes for enlisted men with scores of 69 each 

Lt. E. J. Connelly in the Class A revolver match won second 
prize, a cup. 

The State Prize was an engraving entitled "1815". 

Sgt. Keough was a member of the State Team at the National 
matches. 

WINNING REGIMENTAL TEAM SHOOT, 1912 

The annual State Rifle Competition for winning companies 
was held on October 16, 1912. The conditions were the same as 
the Regimental Match, teams of ten men each firing one sighting, 
and five record shots at 200, 500 and 600 yards. 

The weather conditions were very disagreeable as a very 
strong wind was blowing and it was extremely cold. 

Ompany A came in fourth being defeated by the Ninth Com- 
pany Coast Artillery with a score of 615. Company C First 
Corps Cadets second, score 612 and Company G, 8th Regt. In- 
fantry third, score 610. Company A score was 609, only six- 
points away from the winning outfit. 
The score: 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 70 

Lt. E. I. Connelly 69 

Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 64 

Corp. J. T. Murray 63 

Pvt. E. J. Muse 61 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 60 

Corp. W. I. Sweetser 60 

Lieut. F. H. Rogers 58 

Pvt. M. J. Burns 56 

Corp. E. E. Hickey 48 

Team total 609 



REGIMENTAL INDOOR COMPETITION, 1913 

The regimental indoor competition was held on both Thurs- 
day evening, March 27, I9I3, and Monday evening, March 31st. 
1913. 

244 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

FIRST CORPS OF CADETS MATCH, 1913 
In the First Corps of Cadet match held at the Wakefield 
Range on July 26, 1913, in connection with the New England Mil- 
itary Rifle Association, Company A was victorious and won this 
trophy which now rests in our armory. 

The conditions called for five men shooting two sighting and 
ten shots for record and 200 and 600 yards. Seven teams com- 
peted in this match. 

In addition to winning the trophy each member of the team 
received a silver medal and twenty-five percent of the entrance 
fees went to the Company. 
The score: 

200 
Sgt. Edgar B. Hawkes 46 

Sgt. James H. Keough 44 

Corp. W. 1. Sweetser 40 

Lieut. E. J. Connelly 41 

Lieut. Fred H. Rogers 43 

Team total 449 

Sgt. Edgar B. Hawkes was easily high man of the match with 
a score of 95 out of a possible 100. 



600 


Total 


49 


95 


48 


92 


49 


89 


47 


88 


42 


85 




Won by Co. A at N. E. Shoot 

Bay State Range 
First Corps Cadets Match 



245 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The conditions called for two sighting shots and ten for 
record, offhand and prone positions, on the M. V. M. Gallery Tar- 
get. In order that any company be eligible for prizes eighty per 
cent of the enlisted strength had to shoot. Company A was re- 
-quired to have forty-eight men present at this shoot. 

The match as usual was won by Company A with a fine total 
of 3640 points. 

The Company won a cash prize of |20.00. 

INTERMEDIATE TEAM MATCH, 1913 

This match was open to teams of five men each to shoot two 
sighting and ten shots for record and 200 and 500 yd. prone 
This shoot was also held on July 26, 1913 in conjunction with the 
New England Military Rifle Association meet. 

The team from Company A won the match with a score of 
470 out of a possible 500. Co. K, 6th Regt. of Lowell was a close 
second, just one point behind Company A. 

Company A received a handsome bronze trophy and each 
man received a bronze medal. 

The score: 

Corp. W. 1. Sweetser 
Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 
Corp. M. J. Burns 
Sgt. J. T. Murray 
Corp. E. E. Hickey 

Total score 470 



200 


500 


Total 


46 


50 -. 


- -96 ^ 


48 


47 


95 


47 


47 


94 


48 


46 


94 


47 


44 


91 




1913 Pfaff Trophy 

Intermediate Match. Won by Co. A 
246 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

This match was hotly contested throughout, sixteen teams be- 
ing entered. 

On this day the Sixth Regt. Team of which Sergt. J. H. 
Keough was a member won the Bancroft match. Sergt. Keough 
was second high man with a score of 92 out of a possible 100. 



THE REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, 1913 

The annual sixth regiment held its competition on September 
22nd, 1913, and Company A was again victorious. The condi- 
tions called for teams of ten men, each man to shoot one sight- 
ing and five shots for record at 200, 500 and 600 yds. 

The weather conditions were very bad, the rain falling so 
hard at times that it drove the men to cover and held up the shoot. 



The score: 

Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 

Lt. E. J. Connelly 

Sgt. J. T. Murray 

Lieut. F. H. Rogers 

Corp. E. E. Mickey 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 

Corp. W. I. Sweetser 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 

Corp. M. J. Burns 

Pvt. E. J. Muse 



Team total 



67 
66 
66 
65 
64 
64 
64 
64 
63 
62 

645 



i^.A 




1st Prize State Trophy Regimental 
Competition, 1913 

"Surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown" 



247 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Although the score was not their highest, Company A as a 
whole shot on an even average, there being just five points varia- 
tion between the high and low man. 

Company K of Lowell finished second with a score of 634, 
•Company 1 of Concord third, score 599, and Company H of Stone- 
ham fourth, score 593. 

The State Prize was an engraving entitled "Surrender of 
Cornwallis at Yorktown". 

Sgt. Keough again represented Company A on the State Team 
at the National Matches. 

WINNING REGIMENTAL TEAM SHOOT, 1913 

On October 15, 1913, Company A team represented the Sixth 
Regiment of the Winning Regimental Team shoot. 

Company G, 8th Inf. of Gloucester, won the shoot with a 
total of 645, Company C, 1st Corps of Cadets second, score 638; 
Company E, 2nd Regt. Inf. of Orange, Mass., third place, score 
•637 and Co. A fourth, our score being 624. 

Conditions were the same as the Regimental Match, teams of 
ten men firing one sighting and ten record shots at 200, 500 and 
<600 yards. 

The score: 

Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 69 

Lieut. E. J. Connelly 66 

Lieut. F. H. Rogers 65 

Corp. E. E. Hickey 64 

Sgt. I. T. Murray 64 

Pvt. E. R. Eastman 62 

Pvt. E. J. Muse .. 62 

Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 60 

Capt. J. H. McMahon 59 

Cook H. H. Foster 53 

Total score 624 



248 



CHAPTER TWENTY 

ANNUAL INDOOR COMPETITION, 1914 

Company again won the indoor competition of the Sixth- 
Regiment. This year the shoot was held on three nights, April 
6, 9 and 13. 

In order to make it fair to all the companies the regiment was 
grouped into three classes, in the manner in which they finished at 
the Regimental Outdoor competition held in the fall of 1913. 

In the first group were Companies A, H, K and I. 

As stated above Company A again finished first and was 
awarded a prize of $40.00. Company H of Stoneham finished 
second and was presented with |20.00. 

THE REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, I9I4 

The annual rifle competition of the Sixth Regt. Inf., was held 
on September 15, 1914 at the Wakefield Range. In order ta 
give the enlisted men more of an opportunity to make the Com- 
pany teams all commissioned officers were barred. This was a 
severe blow to Company A but as it v/as likewise true to most of 
the companies, as the commissioned officers were numbered among, 
the very best shots of the regiment. The five new men on the 
team had never before shot in a Regimental match. 

The conditions were also changed and the new order called 
for teams of ten men each member shooting ten shots rapid fire 
at 200 and 300 yds and five shots at 300, 500 and 600 yds. One 
Sighting shot was allowed at 600 yds. The time given to fire ten 
shots rapid at 200 yards being one and one-half minutes and 300 
in two minutes. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

After a hard match Company A was victorious being pressed 
very closely by Company H of Stoneham, winners of the second 
prize. 

The score: 





Slow fire 




Rapid 


fire 


Tota 




300 500 


600 


200 


300 




Pvt. E. R. Eastman 


23 24 


24 


45 


42 


158 


Pvt. C. G. Fish 


23 23 


25 


48 


34 


153 


Sgt. E. E. Hickey 


22 25 


23 


37 


44 


151 


Pvt. W. L. Wenzel 


20 23 


22 


47 


39 


151 


Sgt. E. B. Hawkes 


22 19 


24 


39 


46 


150 


Pvt. B. M. Edgar 


20 22 


21 


42 


43 


148 


Pvt. E. J. Muse 


22 22 


20 


39 


42 


145 


Pvt. J. M. Derby 


23 23 


20 


35 


42 


143 


Sgt. J. T. Murray 


19 23 


22 


44 


34 


142 


Pvt. J. W. Derby 


21 23 


17 


34 


33 


128 


Team total 










1469 



Company H of Stoneham was second with a score of 1466, 
Company K of Lowell third, score 1427, and Company C of Low- 
ell fourth, score 1321. 

Lieut. E. J. Connelly won the Officers' match with a splendid 
score of 163. Capt. J. H. Keough second, with a score of 160. 

The State Prize this year was an engraving entitled "Wash- 
ington's Triumphant Entry into Philadelphia". 

Art. Ernest R. Eastman shot on the State Team at the Na- 
tional Matches. 




1914 State Trophy 

Washington's Triumphant Entry into 
Philadelphia 

250 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
ANNUAL INDOOR COMPETITION, 1915 

Company A won the Annual Indoor Competition with the 
22 cal. rifle for the season of 1915. The match was held on 
March 11th, 18th, 25th and 29th. 

The conditions called for ten shots offhand and ten shots 
prone, no sighting shots, at a distance of seventy-five feet. 

Capt. E. J. Connelly won the distinction of being the high- 
est scorer in the State with a remarkable total of 98 out of a pos- 
sible 100. 

The entire company shot and put a total of 5102 or an aver- 
age of 86.47 points per man. Company H of Stoneham was 
second with a total of 4767 or an average per man of 82.18. 

This was a truly wonderful score when one takes into con- 
sideration that every man on the rolls was compelled to shoot. 
If there were any poor shots in the Company the fine work of the 
Captain acted as an incentive as the scores below will testify. 



Capt. E. J. Connelly 93 

Lt. E. B. Hawkes 95 

Art. E. R. Eastman '. 95 

Pvt. W. L. Wenzel 9? 

Pvt. E. J. Muse 94 

Corp. M. J. Burns 94 

Pvt. C. E. Creedon 94 

Sgt. J. T. Murray 93 

Pvt. S. Muse 92 

Pvt. C. G. Fish 92 

Pvt. C. A. Thompson 91 

Sgt. F. G. Evans 91 

Pvt. S. J. LePave 91 

Sgt. A. D. Baxter 91 

Sgt. E. E. Hickey 90 

Pvt. J. M. Derby 90 

Corp. H. F. Davis 90 

Pvt. J. A. Doucette 90 

Pvt. J. G. Brown 90 

Pvt. J. J. Lee 89 

Cook A. J. Hubbard 89 

Pvt. A. P. McLaughlin 89 

Pvt. W. F. Burns 89 

Pvt. T. W. Walsh 8Q 

Corp. P. G. Findlay 88 

Pvt. 1. C. Singer 88 

Sorp. P. C. Altieri 88 

Pvt. T. J. Quinn 88 

Pvt. H. H. Foster 87 

Pvt. B. M. Edgar 8; 



Pvt. E. J. Sexton . BV 

Pvt. A. T. Burrage Si- 

Pvt. J. W. Derby 86 

Corp. J. E. Creedon 86 

Pvt. C. H. Doucette 86 

Pvt. G. W. Stone 85 

Pvt. A. T. Walsh 85 

Mus. C. I. Cheever 85 

Pvt. W. D. Whitney 85 

Mus. J. W. Findlay 85 

Pvt. A. B. Cayting 85 

Cook J. J. Buckley 84 

Pvt. F. J. Hennessey 84 

Pvt. D. C. Creedon 83 

Pvt. M. J. Duff 83 

Pvt. O. L. Stone 83 

Pvt. C. A. Little 82 

Pvt. R. L. Singer 82 

Pvt. W. D. Seabury SO 

Pvt. J. W. McCullough 79 

Pvt. T. E. Cummings 80 

Pvt. E. E. Johnson 79 

Pvt. T. F. Corcoran 79 

Pvt. T. F. Walsh 79 

Pvt. H. W. Griffith 77 

Pvt. G. B. Huestis 75 

Sgt. E. J. Stark 75 

Sgt. J. Findlay, Jr 75 

Pvt. H. F. Crozier 74 



251 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

THE REGIMENTAL COMPETITION, 1915 

The annual rifle competition of the Sixth Regt. Inf., was held 
at the Wakefield Range. Company A won the match with a to- 
tal score of 1477, bettering last year's score by eight points. 

Company I of Concord was second with a total of 1436, Com- 
pany B of Fitchburg third, total 1386, and Company H of Stone- 
ham fourth, total score, 1360. 

It was a pretty race for the first three ranges, namely 300, 
500 and 600 yards, between Companies A, 1 and H, their respec- 
tive totals for the three ranges being 644, 638 and 636. At the 
rapid fire stage A company added 833 points to its score, I Com- 
pany an even 800, while H Company of which better things were 
expected, scored only 722, which dropped the team to fourth 
place. 

The company's detailed score: 







Slow fire 




Rapid fire 


Tota 




300 


500 


600 


200 300 




Sgt. J. T. Murray 


21 


22 


23 


46 46 


1.58 


Corp. M. J. Burns 


21 


25 


25 


46 4.1 


158 


Pvt. J. M. Derby 


22 


23 


22 


45 42 


154 


Pvt. C. G. Fish 


19 


23 


22 


47 42 


153 


Pvt. C. M. Thompson 


22 


25 


22 


46 37 


152 


Pvt. E. J. Muse 


21 


25 


24 


46 34 


150 


Pvt. W. L. Wenzel 


21 


21 


17 


48 42 


149 


Art. E. R. Eastman 


20 


25 


17 


46 33 


141 


Sgt. E. E. Hickey 


21 


21 


21 


36 40 


139 


Pvt. J. A. Doucette 


16 


21 


16 


31 39 


123 


Team total 










1477 




1915 State Trophy 

Henry Hudson Entering New York Bay 

252 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Sgt. J. T. Murray and Corp. M. J. Burns won second and 
third prizes respectively and Pvt. Joseph M. Derby won a novice 
cup. 

Capt. James H. Keough won the officers' revolver match with 
a score of 77, and Lieut. E. B. Mawkes of Company A was second, 
score 72. 

Pvt. B. M. Edgar shooting a substitute made a score of 140. 

The State Prize this year was an engraving entitled, "Henry 
Hudson Entering New York Bay." 

Pvt. Crowell G. Fish was on the State Team at the National 
Matches. 




Bay State Military Rifle Range, Wakefield, Mass. 

200-yard range is at left 

ANNUAL INDOOR RIFLE COMPETITION, 1916 

The Regimental Indoor Rifle Competition of 1916 was won 
by Company A with a record breaking score. 

The conditions called for ten shots offhand and ten shots 
prone, no sighting shots, distance 75 feet. 

Never in the history of Company had the entire company en- 



253 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

tered into a rifle match but when the scores were all in, the Com- 
pany had made a total of 5702 points out of a possible 6400 or an 
average of 89.09 points per man. It was not rare in looking 
over the scores of other companies to find the top score not equal 
to the average score of Company A so well did all the men shoot. 
Company H of Stoneham was next best in the Sixth regiment 
but their total score was some 400 points behind Company A. 

The score: 

Lieut. E. B. Hawkes 
Corp. M. J. Burns 
Art. E. R. Eastman 
Corp. C. A. Thompson 
Pvt. C. G. Fish 
Capt. E. J. Connelly 
Pvt. H. H. Foster 
Lieut. F. H. Rogers 
Pvt. R. E. Luken 
Pvt. W. L. Wenzel 
Pvt. C. E. Creedon 
Pvt. E. J. Muse 
Pvt. C. A. Little 
Pvt. J. G. Brown 
Sgt. E. E. Hickey 
Pvt. H. E. Nelson 
Pvt. E. M. Fay 
Pvt. J. H. Beebe 
Pvt. G. D. Sargent 
Pvt. T. F. Corcoran 
Pvt. C. W. Goodridge 
Pvt. G. B. Huestis 
Pvt. E. J. Sexton 
Pvt. B. M. Edgar 
Pvt. J. A. Doucette 
Pvt. A. P. McLaughlin 
Sgt. J. T. Murray 
Cook J. J. Buckley 
Pvt. P. U. Holoway 
Pvt. M. J. Duff 
Pvt. G. A. Burrage 
Pvt. J. W. Derby 



Pvt. J. M. Derby . 
Pvt. J. W. McCullough 
Pvt. E. E. Smith . 
Pvt. W. D. Seabury 
Pvt. A. G. Williams 

Pvt. J. J. Lee 

Pvt. R. H. Wright 
Pvt. M. N. Harlow 
Pvt. T. E. Cummings 
Sgt. F. G. Evans . 
Cook A. J. Hubbard 
Corp. P. G. Findlay 
Pvt. W. F. Burns 
Pvt. G. B. Brockbank 
Pvt. G. L. Dilloway, Jr 
Pvt. A. T Walsh 
Corp. Fl. F. Davis 
Corp. G. W. Stone 
Pvt. A. B. Cayting 
Pvt. H. W. Holden 
Corp. T. J. Quinn 
Pvt. E. F. Better, Jr 
Pvt. S. C. GersinoMtch 
Sgt. J. E. Creedon 
Pvt. C. F. Jeffery 
Pvt. T. F. Walsh 
Pvt. L. A. Luken . 
Pvt. C. H. Doucette 
Pvt. D. C. Creedon 
Pvt. R. L. Singer 
Sgt. John Findlay, Jr. 
Pvt. O. L. Stone 



On account of the Mexican Border trouble it was decided that 
all Regimental Competitions, outdoors, for the season of 1916 
be abandoned, therefore Company lost another chance to secure 
the State prize for that year. The rifle team however continued 
to spend much time at the range and the Company was in splen- 
did shape to vanquish all competitors. 

Indoor shooting was taken up as soon as the cold weather 
came, there being weekly shoots, small prizes being offered in 



254 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

each class. The classes consisted of all rifle team men in the Dis- 
tinguished Expert Class. All other men qualifying in the Expert 
Class but not members of the Rifle Team were in the Expert Class, 
the Sharpshooter Class and the Marksman's class. 

As the World War broke out early in 1917, in fact Company 
being called into service on March 29th of that year, all rifle work 
both indoors and out was suspended. 

The next match that this company participated in was in 
1920. Although the designation of the Company and the Regi- 
ment was changed the rifle shots came to the front and had a very 
successful year. 

Detailed records show you what took place fronj 1920 until 
the present time. 



MARKSMANSHIP MEDALS 



At the annual Fall Field Day, in observance of the anni- 
versary of the Richardson Light Guard, the following medals are 
competed for by active members of the company: 

Carpenter (Best Shot) Medal. Presented by Maj. George 
O. Carpenter in 1868. 

Kingman (Second Prize) Medal. Presented by Capt. Sam- 
uel C. Kingman in 1881. 

Cheney (Third Prize) Medal. Presented by George H. 
Cheney in 1888. 

Gihon (Long Range) Medal. Presented by Col. Edward J. 
Gihon in 1901. 

Goodale (Marksman's) Medal. Presented by Gen. Green- 
leaf A. Goodaie in 1911. 

The winners of these medals since the Fall of 1901, (with the 
exception of the years 1917, 1918, 1919 and 1920 when no field 
days were held, including the World War period) have been as fol- 
lows: 

CARPENTER MEDAL 

1901 Pvt. R. E. Gibson 1912 Lt. E. J. Connelly 

1902 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 1913 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 

1903 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 1914 Pvt. E. J. Muse 

1904 Sgt. W. G. Hunt 1915 Art. E. R. Eastman 

1905 Pvt. G. W. Reid 1916 Pvt. J. M. Derby 

1906 Pvt. J. J. Cronin 1921 Lt. J. H. Beebe, Jr. 

1907 Pvt. G. W. Reid 1922 Lt. J. G. Brown 

1908 Sgt. J. H. Keough 1923 Bug. Philip Pasqualino 

1909 Capt. J. H. McMahon 1924 Capt. T. J. Ouinn 

1910 Lt. F. H. Rogers 1925 Lt. Carl I. Cheever 

1911 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 

255 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



KINGMAN MEDAL 



1901 Bug. Samuel Bourgeois 

1902 Pvt. G. W. Reid 

1903 Corp. J. J. Cronin 

1904 Pvt. E. B. Hawkes 

1905 Pvt. G. W. Chesley 

1906 Q. M. Sgt. |. H. Keough 

1907 Capt. J. H.' McMahon 

1908 Pvt. W. I. Sweetser 

1909 Lt. E. J. Connelly 

1910 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 

1911 Lt. F. H. Rogers 



1912 Capt. J. H. McMahon 

1913 Capt. J. H. McMahon 

1914 Sgt. J. T. Murray 

1915 Pvt. J. G. Brown 

1916 Pvt. J. G. Brown 

1921 Pvt. Frank Wengen 

1922 Sgt. Roy E. Luken 

1923 Capt. T. J. Quinn 

1924 Sgt. John T. Dingle 

1925 Sgt. Frank Wengen 



CHENEY MEDAL 



1901 Pt. G. M. Jefts 

1902 Pt. C. A. Combs 

1903 Pvt. Samuel Bourgeois 

1904 Pvt. R. E. Gibson 

1905 Sgt. E. J. Connelly 

1906 Pvt. W. A. Durward 

1907 Lt. E. J. Connelly 

1908 Capt. J. H. McMahon 

1909 Lt. F. H. Rogers 

1910 Corp. J. T. Murray 

1911 Corp. J. T. Murray 



1912 Corp. E. E. Hickey 

1913 Corp. W. \. Sweetser 

1914 Art. E. R. Eastman 

1915 Corp. M. J. Burns 

1916 Corp. C. A. Thompson 

1921 Capt. T. J. Quinn 

1922 Lt. C. I. Cheever 

1923 Sgt. Frank Wengen 

1924 Sgt. Edward J. Meuse 

1925 Capt. T. J. Quinn 



GIHON MEDAL 
(Long range match for experts) 



1901 Lt. E. E. Morrison 

1902 Pt. C. A. Coombs 

1903 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough 

1904 Pvt. G. W. Reid 

1905 Sgt. W. G. Hunt 

1906 Pvt. R. E. Gibson 

1907 Sgt. F. H. Rogers 

1908 Corp. J. T. Barton 

1909 Lt. E. J. Connelly, Record, 94 

1910 Pvt. E. J. Meuse 

1911 Corp. E. E. Hickey 



1912 Q. M. Sgt. J. H. Keough, 

Record, 95 

1913 Capt. J. H. McMahon 

1914 Art. E. R. Eastman, Record 96 

1915 Sgt. E. E. Hickey 

1916 Corp. C. A. Thompson 

1921 Lt. James G. Brown 

1922 no competition 

1923 no competition 

1924 no competition 

1925 Capt. T. J. Quinn 



GOODALE MEDAL (FOR MARKSMAN'S CLASS) 



1911 Pvt. John Fowler 

1912 Mus. J. W. Findlay 

1913 Pvt. E. R. Eastman ' 

1914 Pvt. R. H. McKinnon 



1915 Corp. H. F. Davis 

1916 Pvt. E. F. Better, Jr. 

1921 Cpl. Peter Quinn 

1922 Pvt. Charles Smith 



256 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

SEAGIRT MATCHES 
August 11, 1921 

The Massachusetts State Rifle Team on which there were a 
number of Richardson Light Guard crack shots, attended the Rifle 
Matches at Sea Girt, N. J. The following members were on the 
State Rifle Team for 1921 : Capt. Thomas J. Quinn, Sgt. Carl I. 
Cheever, Lt. James G. Brown and Pvts. J. 1\ Dingle, P. Martin, 
H. H. Maguire and Roy E. Luken. The 9th Mass. Inf. team 
which included a number of Co. K shots won the Cruickshank 
Match at this meet. 




1921 Tyro Team Match 

Peters Cartridge Co. Trophy, 
Won by Co. K, 9th Inf. 



Three members, Lt. Brown, Pvts. Maguire and Martin of 
Company K of Wakefield, were members of the Massachusetts In- 
fantry Team which won the Interstate Briggs Trophy at Sea Girt, 
Aug. 24, 1921. 

The Tyro Company Team Match for trophy presented by 
Peters Cartridge Company was won by a team from Company K 
of Wakefield composed of Lt. Brown 46, Pvt. Maguire 46, and Pvt. 
R. E. Luken 41 ; team total 133. This match was shot in connec- 
tion with the Sea Girt matches, August 1921. 

Pvt. Herbert H. Maguire of Co. K won second place in the 
Nevada Match, making a possible at 1200 yards, lacking only two 
points in the total to win the match. 

257 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

COMPANY K WINS PlRSr REGIMENTAL SHOOT 
SINCE THE WAR 

October 27, 1921 
Company K of Wakefield won the Regimental Championship 
of the 9th Mass. Inf. Eighteen teams competed. This was in- 
deed very pleasing to all the followers of the old Richardson Light 




A Group of Prizes Won by the R. L. G. After the War 

Tipper EoAv, left to right: Eelay Eace, 1921, won by Co. K, 9th 
Inf ; 1st Prize, 1921, Eegt. Competition 101st Inf., won by Co. K; 
State Indoor Eifle Competition, 1922, 2ncl Prize, won by Co. K, 
101st Inf.; Platoon Prize presented by Capt. Quinn, 1921, won 
by Lt. Beebe's Platoon; Indoor State Eifle Competition, 1923, 
3rd Prize, won by Co. K, 101st Inf.; Eegt. Competition, 1924, 
Avon by Co. E, 182ud Inf.; Eegt. Competition, 1923, 2nd Prize, 
won by Co. E, 182nd Inf. 

Guard teams, especially the men who won many a hard fought 
battle and created records that stand today unsurpassed. The 
following members composed the team: Capt. Thomas J. Quinn, 
Lt. James G. Brown, Lt. John H. Beebe, Jr., Sgt. Roy E. Luken, 
Sgt. William Walsh, Cpl. John T. Dingle, Sgt. Carl I. Cheever, 
Pvt. Ernest R. Eastman, Pvt. Andrew Riorden and Pvt. Frank 
Wen gen. 

The company was awarded the handsome Logan cup. 
258 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On January 17, 1922, the members of the Massachusetts btate 
Rifle Team were presented with appropriate gold medals suspend- 
ed from red, white and blue ribbons. 

COMPANY K, 9TH MASS. WINS THE FIRST CORPS 
CADET MATCH 

On September 23, 1921, the First Corps of Cadet match was 
won by the Richardson Light Guard. This match was held in 
conjunction with the United Services of New England meet. The 
conditions called for teams of six men, each man firing ten shots 
at 200 and 600 yards. The following members shot on the team: 
Capt. T. J. Quinn, Lt. J. G. Brown, Sgt. Roy E. Luken, Cpl. 
John T. Dingle, Pvt. H. H. Maguire and Pvt. Paul M. Martin. 

STATE INDOOR COMPETITION, MAY 5, 1922 

In the State Championship Indoor Match Company K, 101st 
of Wakefield won second place. Company F, 101st Engineers of 
Stoneham won the competition. The company was presented 
with a silver cup for its prize. In the individual scores 1st prize 
went to Pvt. Herbert H. Maguire, score 187 out of possible 200, 
Cpl. Frank Wengen won third prize with score of 184. 

Lt. James G. Brown and Pvt. Roy E. Luken won places on 
the State Team in 1922. 

REGIMENTAL COMPETITION 1922 

September 23rd 

(Records could not be obtained at time of publication of 

this book.) 

STATE INDOOR COMPETITION 1923 

Company E of Wakefield won third prize in the Indoor Com- 
petition held by the State. The company was presented with a 
silver cup suitably inscribed. 

Pvt. Edward J. Muse of Company E, 182nd of Wakefield won 
a place on the Mass. State Team in 1923. 

C. OF C. AND N. G. MATCHES 

Company E entered teams in the Corps of Cadets Match, also 
the National Guard Match, both shot on August 26, 1923. The 
company team finished fourth in the Corps of Cadets Match and 
third in the National Guard Match. The following men shot on 
the Corps of Cadets match : Capt. Quinn, Lt. Cheever, Sgt. Wen- 

259 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

gen, Cpl. Walsh, Pvt. Muse, Pvt. Reardon, and in the National 
Guard Match, Lt. Cheever, Sgt. Wengen, Cpl. Walsh, Pvt. Pas- 
qualino, Pvt. Luken, Pvt. Muse and Pvt. Reardon. 

REGIMENTAL MATCH 

The Regimental Match of the 182nd Inf. was held on Sunday, 
October 14. Company F of Waltham won first place, score 805, 
Company E of Wakefield was second with a score of 775. Eleven 
companies competed in the match. 

UNITED SERVICES MATCHES 
Wakefield, August, 1924 

Sgt. John T. Dingle of Company E was a member of the 
Mass. Rifle Team which won the trophy in the N. E. Interstate 
Hayden All American Match. 

Company E finished third in the First Corps of Cadet Match 
on August 25, 1924. Company L of Maiden won the match. 
Sgt. John T. Dingle of Company E made a record score in this 
match having a total of 98 out of a possible 100 points. Sgt. 
Dingle made a possible at 200 yards offhand, a remarkable per- 
formance. The members of the company who shot on the team 
were: Capt. Quinn, Lt. Cheever, 1st Sgt. Dingle, Sgt. Dolbeare, 
Sgt. Wengen and Cpl. John Martin. 

REGIMENTAL CHAMPIONSHIP 
Company E again won the Regimental Championship of the 
182nd Inf at the Wakefield Range, October 26, 1924. Seventeen 
teams competed in this match. Conditions called for teams of 
ten men firing ten shots at 200 and 300 yards. Company L of 
Maiden finished in second place with a score of 830, Company E's 
score being 841. 

The following men shot on the team of Co. E: 

Sgt. R. B. Dolbeare 
Capt. T. J. Quinn 
Sgt. J. T. Dingle 
Sgt. F. J. Wengen 
Lt. C. L Cheever 
Pvt. A. Dulong 
Pvt. Cucurullo 
Lt. F. F. Marchetti 
Cpl. J. E. Martin 
Sgt. E. J. Meuse 

Team total 841 

The Company was awarded a silver cup. 

260 



200 


300 


Total 


41 


49 


90 


44 


46 


90 


41 


48 


89 


42 


47 


89 


37 


46 


83 


39 


43 


82 


34 


46 


80 


36 


44 


80 


35 


44 


79 


36 


43 


79 



200 


600 


Total 


44 


46 


90 


41 


45 


86 


37 


46 


83 


39 


42 


81 


40 


40 


80 


39 


35 


74 



MisTORY Of Richardson Light Guard 

FIRST CORPS OF CADETS MATCH, 1925 

The First Corps of Cadets team match at the New England 
Shoot on August 21 was won by Company E, 182nd Inf. of Wake- 
field, and the victory carries with it the title of company cham- 
pions of New England. 

Company E's total at 200 and 600 yards was 494, fifteen 
points ahead of Company L, 182nd Inf. of Maiden, which was 
the winning company in this event last year. Seven teams com- 
peted. Lt. Carl I. Cheever was high man of all competitors, 
making a total of 90 out of a possible 100 at the two ranges. 

The members and scores of Company E were as follows: 

Lt. C. 1. Cheever 
Sgt. J. T. Dingle 
Sgt. E. J. Muse 
Sgt. R. B. Dolbeare 
Capt. T. J. Quinn 
Sgt. F. Wengen 

Team total 494 

Sgt. John T. Dingle was also a member of the 182nd team 
which won the Bancroft Match on the same day. 

STATE SHOOT, OCT. 12, 1925 

Capt. T. J. Quinn and Lt. C. 1. Cheever represented Company 
E as members of the Regimental team which won the Tri Color at 
the State Shoot. 

REGIMENTAL SHOOT, 1925 

On Oct. 13 Company E participated in the annual regimental 
■shoot which took place at the Wakefield Range. The company 
finished in third place. Seventeen teams competed. The mem- 
bers of the company competing in this match were: Capt. Quinn, 
Lt. Cheever, Sgts. Dolbeare, Wengen, Dingle and Meuse; Cpls. 
Tenney and Martin, and Pvts. Robbins and Cucurullo. 

On August 1, 1926 the Mass. State Rifle Team was selected 
at the local rifle range. 1st Lt. Carl I. Cheever of the R. L. G. 
was selected as a shooting member on the team of twelve officers 
and men. Lt. Cheever was high man of the Massachusetts state 
rifle team, representing the M. N. G., in the All-America national 
team match. He was also a member of the 182nd Inf. team which 
won the Bancroft Regimental Championship match and again on 
the 182nd Infantry team which won the National Guard regi- 
mental match of Camp Curtis Guild. 

261 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



On Sept. I, 1926, the Mass. State Team left for Sea Girt, N. 
J., to compete in matches held there. Lt. Cheever shot on the- 
182nd regimental team, which completed in the Interstate Regi- 
mental Team match and which finished second. 

The same team in the Champion Regimental Team match 
finished second. He was a member of the Mass. team competing 
in the Herrick and Sadler matches which was highest among the 
National Guard teams competing and for which they were award- 
ed medals, being beaten only by the marine and navy teams. 

He was also in the money prizes in the Marine Corps Cup 
Match. The Mass. team won all National Guard matches ex- 
cept one, bringing much credit to the National Guard of this State. 

Winners Of Drill Medals 

The company has three medals, donated b}^ citizens of the 
town, many years ago, to be competed for yearly in the manual 
of arms, and these medals are known under the following titles: 
1st prize, donated by Cyrus Wakefield; second prize by Dr. S. O. 
Richardson; third prize by Hon. Lucius Beebe. Medals were- 
won as follows, from 1902 to 1926, except the years 1917 to 1920,. 
inclusive, when no competive drills were held: 







WAKEFIELD MEDAL 


1902 


Sgt. 


,T. Fred Roiian 


1913 


CpL E. E. Hickey 


1903 


Sgt. 


J. Fred Ronan 


1914 


Sgt. E. E. Hickey 


1904 


1st 


Sgt. E. J. ConneUy 


1915 


Mus. C. I. Cheever 


1905 


Sgt. 


Walter G. Hunt 


1916 


Mus. C. I. Cheever 


1906 


sit. 


Walter G. Hunt 


1921 


Sgt. C. I. Cheever 


1907 


sit. 


Walter G. Hunt 


1922 


CpL Peter A. Quinn 


1908 


Pvt. 


Fred B. Gerry 


1923 


CpL Edward J. Meuse 


1909 


Sgt. 


E. B. Hawkes 


1924 


Sgt. Edward J. Meuse 


1910 


Pvt. 


W. I. Svt^eetser 


1925 


No driU 


1911 


Sgt. 


A. D. Baxter 


1926 


Sgt. John T. Dingle 


1912 


s|-t. 


J. Findlay, Jr. 










RICHARDSON MEDAL 


1902 


CpL 


B. J. Connelly 


1913 


Pvt. C. I. Cheever 


1903 


Sgt. 


Walter I. Sweetser 


1914 


CpL J. E. Creedon 


1904 


Sgt. 


Walter G. Hunt 


1915 


Sgt. J. T. Murray 


1905 


Pvt. 


W. Burbine 


1916 


Sgt. E. E. Hickey 


1906 


Sgt. 


Fred H. Rogers 


1921 


CpL Rov H. Wright 


1907 


Sgt. 


Fred H. Rogers 


1922 


Sgt. Roy H. Wright 


1908 


sit. 


E. B. Havpkes 


1923 


Pvt. J. T. Dingle 


1909 


CpL 


J. F. Barton 


1924 


CpL Abbott Fein del 


1910 


CpL 


P. W. Mortimer 


1925 


No drill 


1911 


CpL 


J. T. Murray 


1928 


Pvt. Ralph Woods 


1912 


CpL 


W. I. Sweetser 












BEEBE MEDAL 


1902 


CpL 


Walter G. Hunt 


1913 


Sgt. E. J. Stark 


1903 


CpL 


B. C. Dean 


1914 


Pvt. C. I. Cheever 


1904 


Sgt. 


Walter I. Sweetser 


1915 


Pvt. T. W. Walsh 


1905 


Sgt. 


B. C. Dean 


1916 


Pvt. J. G. Brown 


1906 


sit. 


B. B. Hawkes 


1921 


Sgt. Raymond Beane 


1907 


sit. 


E. B. Hawkes 


1922 


CpL J. T. Dingle 


1908 


Sgt. 


E. J. Stark 


1923 


Sgt. John Lyons 


1909 


Pvt. 


E. L. Hunt 


1924 


Sgt. Richard B. Dolbeare- 


1910 


Pvt. 


C. I. Cheever 


1925 


No drill 


1911 


Sgt. 


J. Findlay, Jr. 


1920 


Pvt. Tony Velicke 


1912 


Sgt. 


B. J. Stark 







262 



CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE 

REORGANIZATION OF CO. A 6TH MASS. INF. 
1919 

September 12. On this date Major E. J. Connelly was asked 
by Col. Sweetser of the old 6th Regt. to reorganize Company A 
6th Regt. A meeting was held to make arrangements and repre- 
sentatives were at the Armory, September 14, 15 and 17 to enlist 
men to make up a unit of 65 total strength. This unit to be en- 
tirely separate from Company H. State Guard which was to be 
soon mustered out. On September 15, 35 recruits had been signed. 
The enlistment was for one year, drills to begin January, 1920. 
On September 16th the total enrollment was 45 men. Maj. Con- 
nelly had been offered the captaincy and later a majority in the 
battalion but declined owing to business reasons. Thomas J. 
Quinn, a former member of Company A, was chosen as captain. 
Clarence A. Thompson, also a member of Company A during the 
war, was chosen as 1st Lt. on September 23. 

Regimental Headquarters reported that the Richardson Light 
Guard had the honor of leading all other companies in the regi- 
ment for enlistments. The total strength on this date was 41 en- 
listed men and two officers. 

The designation of the Company at this time was Company 
A, 6th Mass. Provisional Regiment, and continued to be such until 
a new Company was formed on October 20, 1920, and designa- 
ted as Company K, 9th Inf. M. N. G. Thomas J. Quinn was 
commissioned as Captain of the new Company. James G. Brown 
was commissioned as 1st Lt. on September 9, 1920, and John H. 
Beebe, Jr., was commissioned as 2nd Lt. on November 26, 1920. 

Company K, 9th Inf., was mustered in last evening with a 
total of 54 present. The men were inspected by Lt. Colonel Hen- 



r ' , 









i-j 

( 



/4'WJ' ■.^%■ 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

nigan of the U. S. Army representing the War Department, and 
'Col. Foote representing the State. Col. Foley of the 101st and 
Major Desmond of this Battalion were also present. Col. Foley 
gave a very interesting talk to the boys and they were also enter- 
tained by Mr. Stanley, who was an overseas veteran and acquaint- 
ed with the members. 




1st Lt. James G. Brown 

2nd Lt. Co. A, 126th Inf., 32nd Div. 

(World War) 

1st Lt. Co. K, 101st Inf., 1919-1920 



1920 

November 15. Company K took part in the dedication of 
the Boulder, situated on the common, in memory of the soldiers 
and sailors of Wakefield who lost their lives in the World War. A 
large turnout was present from the Richardson Light Guard and 
a fine showing was made. 

December 8. Captain T. J. Quinn was appointed custodian 
of the State Armory to succeed Col. John H. McMahon. 

December 10. The Fine Members Association of the Rich- 



265 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ttiubon Light Guard held a meeting on this evening to make plans 
for reorganization. A large number were present and officers 
were elected for the ensuing year. 

1921 

January 6. The Company received a check for $100, a gift 
from Chas. N. Winship who has always been a friend of the Rich- 
ardson Light Guard. 

January 10. Plans were made to raise funds for a trip to 
Washington to take part in the Inaugural exercises. A Sacred 
Concert was held later at the Wakefield Theatre at which a con- 
siderable sum of money was raised and deposited in the Washing- 
ton Fund. 




2nd Lt. John H. Beebe, Jr. 

Co. K, 101st Inf. 



January 13. Company K held a flag day sale and raised 
over 1 100 which was deposited in the Company Fund. Small 
flags were sold to the citizens of the town for the purpose of rais- 
ing money. 



266 




Top: Capt. Thomas J. Quinii, Co. A, 6th Mass. Provisional Eegt., 
Co. K, 9th Eegt., Mass. Inf., Co. K, 101st Inf., Co. E, 182nd Inf. 
Left: 1st Lt. Carl I. Cheever, Co. K, 101st Inf., Co. E, 182nd Inf. 
Eight: 2nd Lt. Frank F. Marchetti, Co. K, 101st Inf., Co. E, 
182nd Inf. 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



January 27. A grand military ball was held on this date, this 
being the first social aflfair held by the new Company. The Fine 
Members Association assisted the Company in receiving guests 
and in making arrangements. Many prominent military men 
from Wakefield and out of town were present. A very enjoyable 
entertainment was furnished by a professional company, after 
which dancing was enjoyed. The grand military march was led 
by the officers of the Company, followed by out-of-town military 
officers and Fine Members Association. The music was 
furnished by Bowl's Black and White Orchestra. The Armory 
was beautifully decorated with bunting and streamers. 

March 16. Company K assembled for Federal Inspec- 
tion and the officers v/ere complimented by the inspecting officers 
for the remarkable progress made since the reorganization. 

March 18. The members of the Company participated in 
the Evacuation Parade at South Boston and that evening took part 
in the tournament at the East Armory. 

April 23. The annual prize drill was held in the Armory 
and was attended by many of the prominent citizens of the town, 
together with Fine members and guests. The platoon drill was 
won by the second platoon under Lt. Beebe. The judges were 
Col. Foley, Major Agnew and Capt. Fitzgerald, all of the 101st 
Infantry. After the drill dancing was enjoyed until twelve 
o'clock. Music was furnished by the Lynn Cadet Orchestra. 

May 30. Company K acted as escort to Post 12 G. A. R. at 
their Memorial Day exercises. 

July 9. The Company was ordered to assemble at the Ar- 
mory to attend the annual tour of camp duty at Camp Devens, 
Ayer, Massachusetts. This tour was for fourteen days from 
July 9 to 23. 



268 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

The following is the roster of Company K who attended the 
first eamp: 



Capt. Thomas J. Quinn 
1st Lt. James G. Brown 
2d Lt. John H. Beebe, Jr. 
1st Sgt. Sylvanus K. Wheeler 
Mess Sgt. Roy E. Luken 
Supply Sgt. Wm. Walsh 

Sergeants 
Carl 1. Cheever 
George P. Fraughton 
Frank F. Marchetti 
Roy E. Wright 

Corporals 
Jos. J. Burbine 
James J. Chambers 
Merrill B. Cotting 
John D. Lyons 
Walter Melanson 
Frank D. Smith 
Peter J. Quinn 

Privates 1st Class 
Flarold A. Anderson 
Paul W. Bartlett 
Vincent R. Bowdoin 
Louis A. Doucette 
Fred J. Doucette 
David F. Ingerton 
J. Walter King 
Everett H. LeBIanc 
Joseph A. Lucy 
Edward J. Muse 
Stephen McGonagle 
John J. O'Leary 
Wm. D. Scott 
Chas. W. Smith 
W. D. Smith 
Paul J. Sullivan 
Stanley J. Goodwin 
Frank J. Goodwin 

Dr. Frederick A. Simonds, a World War Veteran from this 
town was attached to the regiment as captain of the Medical 
Corps. As this was the first camp of the newly organized Com- 
pany much of the tim.e was employed in close order work and 
great care was given to details as many of the men were serving 
their first tour. Sports were enjoyed every afternoon and this 
tour did much to round the Company into good military shape. 



Bugler Geo. A. Marchetti 
Cook Arthur Wyatt 
Mech. Edward Bird 

Privates 
Joseph T. Bird 
Harry H. Bird 
Albert L. Berry 
Joseph J. Connell 
Joseph C. Doucette 
Thomas J. Dingle 
John R. Deveau 
Harold A. Doucette 
Reuben A. Draper 
Foster Dupont 
George D. Goodwin 
Hilton M. Gerrior 
Herbert H. Hanright 
Edward Halloran 
Frank H. Hackett, Jr. 
Philip Haggerty 
George Homer 
Philip Hall 
Robert E. Johnson 
Charles T. Kelley 
Willard L. Lux 
Jeffrey LaFave 
Joseph T. Meuse 
Harold A. Melanson 
Hugo H. Marchetti 
John D. Maroney 
Frank A. Nelson 
Andrew Riorden 
Edward Sulo 
Robert Spadafora 
William T. Sweeney 
Hov/ard H. Smith 
Wm. J. Sweetman 
Wm. J. Tracy 
John A. Zanni 



269 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

On the rifle range especially, the Wakefield Company dis- 
tinguished itself and led the regiment in individual records. Of 
course, this was expected from the Wakefield marksmen. 

July 23. Welcome Home to Wakefield soldiers from camp 
duty. Considering the fact that it was Saturday afternoon with 
many people out of town, there was a creditable turnout of 
patriotic organizations and civilians to welcome home Company K 
from Camp Devens. On short notice Selectman Peterson ar- 
ranged the parade composed of delegations from the G. A. R., 
American Legion, women's patriotic organizations, representatives 
of the Honorary Association of the Company, Fine Members of 
Company K, and Selectmen McMaster, Peterson and Goodwin. 
The parade was headed by a police detail under Chief James 
J. Pollard, and the Hugh O'Neil Fife and Drum Corps. 

When Company K arrived at the Upper Station from their 
fortnight in the open air, they were pleasantly surprised to find the 
turn out of merchants and citizens lined up on North Avenue, for 
the officers were the only ones who knew the arrangements. 
Chairman L. L. McMaster spoke briefly, congratulating the young 
soldiers on the very excellent camp work and expressed the town's 
gratification in the fact that they had upheld the honored tradi- 
tions of the old R. L. G. Their former Commander, Major Ed- 
ward J. Connelly, who was Marshal of the civic parade and Cap- 
tain Thomas J. Quinn of Company K, then swung their organiza- 
tions into line and marched up North Avenue, to Main street and 
down through Wakefield Square to the Armory. 

August 2. The first regimental shoot after the War was held 
at the Wakefield Range and it is very pleasing to note that the 
Wakefield Company came through with flying colors, winning the 
General Logan troph}'. A complete record of this shoot will be 
found under the paragraph dealing with rifle work in the Com- 
pany. 

September 17. Company K, 9th Inf. Richardson Light 
Guard acted as escort at the funeral of General Lawrence Logan, 
father of Col. Edward L. Logan who commanded the 101st Infan- 
try overseas. The funeral was held in Boston and the Company 
was transported by trucks. 

270 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

October 11. The 70th Anniversary of the Fall Field Day 
and Shoot was held on this date, the shoot taking place at the 
Wakefield Range and banquet at the Armory in the evening. The 
Fine Members as usual participated for prizes offered in the dif- 
ferent classes. The banquet was a brilliant affair. Many out 
of town guests were present, together with Fine A4embers and 
citizens of the town. Dr. J. \Vm. O'Connell acted as toastmaster 
in a very creditable manner. Following the speaking dancing 
was enjoyed by all. Among the speakers of the evening were Col. 
Foley, Commander of the Regiment; Col. Ed. J. Gihon. Past Com- 
mander of the Richardson Light Guard, and Lauren L. McMaster, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen. The prizes were awarded 
by Col. John H. .McMahon. 

November 1 5. Company K took part in the parade and re- 
ception given in honor of Marshal Ferdinand Foch, leader of all 
Allied troops in the World War. The parade was held in Boston 
and witnessed by many thousands. The Company made a very 
fine showing along the line of march. Many attended the recep- 
tion in the evening at the Boston Arena. 

November 21. A business pageant was held in the Armory 
under the auspices of the Wakefield Lodge of Elks. Members of 
the Company assisted in this aff'air and received a letter thanking 
them for their efforts and praising the efficiency of the members 
of the Company for details ably taken care of. 

December 30. .\ very enjoyable Christmas party and ban- 
quet was held at the Armory. Dinner was served at 6.30 o'clock. 
Wm. J. Pellessier of Greenwood, a very good friend of the Rich- 
ardson Light Guard, entertained the members of the Company. 
Gifts were distributed from the Christmas tree by Lt. James G. 
Brown, each member furnishing a gift appropriate of the occasion. 
Much enjoyment was had and it was decided to conduct affairs of 
this kind ever}' year. 

1922 
January 29. Company K had its regimental inspection this 
evening by Col. Thomas F. Foley who complimented the Com- 
pany on its general appearance and gave a short talk about the 

271 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

coming Federal inspection in February. He said the local Com- 
pany stood the highest in the regiment and he thought in all New 
England and expected them to duplicate the fine showing made at 
the inspection last year. He looked forward to Company K win- 
ning the State indoor shoot. 

May 30. Company K participated in the usual Memorial 
Day Exercises today. The firing squad was furnished by the 
Company and Bugler George Marchetti sounded taps. The 
Company then returned to the Armory and enjoyed a light lunch. 

June 11. Company K marched to the Elks Home and es- 
corted the Wakefield Lodge of Elks to the bandstand in the park 
where the customary Flag Day Exercises were held. Rain pre- 
vented the completion of the exercises at the park and they were 
completed at the Elks Home. A light lunch was served. 

July 8. Annual Camp Tour — July 8 through July 22. 
Company K left the Armory at 8.45 and entrained at 9.07 A.M. 
for Boston. Arrived at North Station at 9.30 A. M. and en- 
trained immediately on a special train for Camp Devens. Ar- 
rived at Camp Devens about 12.30 P. M. and marched to Area on 
13th St., Barracks 961 arriving about 1.15 P. M. Afternoon 
spent making camp. Sunday, July 9, church service. Company 
left for the rifle range, a hike of about three miles in heavy march- 
ing order. Quarters on the range were pyramidal tents. 

Monday, July 10. Time spent qualifying the Company. 

Tuesday, July 11. Same as yesterday. 

Wednesday, July 12. Spent part of morning qualifying and 
then rolled packs and marched back to the barracks. The weath- 
ei very hot at noon. The men arrived back in the barracks in 
exhausted condition due to the rate of march. 

Thursday, July 13, morning spent in close order drill. The 
Company went on guard at five o'clock. The officer of the day 
was Captain Quinn and officer of the guard, Lt. Cheever. 

Company K was picked to select the firing squad at the funer- 
al of Private Mealy who was killed in an accident. 

July 14. The Company performed guard duty. 

272 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

July 15. Regular drill in forenoon reviewed by General Ed- 
wards. Commanding Officer of the First Corps Area, Boston. 

Sunday, July 16. Church services in morning. Many rela- 
tives and friends visited the men. 

Monday, July 17. The Company was merged with the other 
Companies of the Batallion in forming a war strength company. 
Captain Quinn acted as Battalion Commander. The war 
strength company executed several tactical problems. The Com- 
pany acted as escort to the colors at the evening parade. 

Tuesday, July 18. Regimental combat problems advancing 
on imaginary enemy. The first and second battalion acting as 
assault waves with the 3rd battalion in support. Flares and 
rockets were used for calling the artillery barrage which was used 
in gaining the objective. The afternoon was spent in gas instruc- 
tion, and the use of gas masks. The men passed through area 
oi tear gas after instruction. Evening parade was held. 

Wednesday, July 19. Morning spent with Companies of the 
battalion consolidated into a war strength company. Captain 
Quinn acting as commander. In the afternoon the men were 
given an opportunity to get their equipment clean for the review 
which was held in honor of Governor Channing Cox. The Gov- 
ernor called all the troops about the bandstand after the review 
and expressed his gratitude for the showing made. 

The remainder of the week was spent in combat problems. 
The Company returned to the Armory on Saturday. 

October 19. The annual banquet of Company K was held in 
the form of a stag party. There were about 32 Fine Members 
3nd about 46 of the Company members present. The prizes were 
awarded to the winners of the Annual Field Day Shoot. The 
awards are to be found under shooting records of the Company. 

December 5. F'uneral escort of Dr. Simonds at Universalist 
Church. The Company furnished a squad and bugler in co-oper- 
ation with Company F, 101st Engineers of Stoneham, who formed 
the funeral escort. 

273 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

1923 

January 10. The Company participated in the regimental 
review held in the East Armory on this date. The Company left 
Wakefield at 6.30 P. M. by special car and arrived at the East 
Armory about eight o'clock. 

March 17. The Company assembled at the Armory at 12.15 
and proceeded to the East Armory, Boston, where the entire regi- 
ment assembled at \.\5 and marched to South Boston to take part 
ii; the Annual Evacuation Day Parade. After the parade an en- 
tertainment and banquet was held at the East Armory and a 
very pleasant time was had. 




Second Prize 

Wakefield B. B. League 1922-23 
Won by Co. K, 101st Eegt. 



April 1. The Company had been transferred from the 101st 
Infantry effective this date and the new Company designated 
as Company E, 182nd Infantry. Col. Albert C. Gray, former- 
ly Lt. Col. of the 101st Engineers, commands the new regiment. 

April 16. Drill checks were distributed to the Company 
m.embers. Captain Quinn received second prize won by the 
Company in the basket ball league and expressed his appreciation 
to the team. Major Desmond gave a short talk to the Company 
and wished them the best of luck in the new regiment to which the 

274 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Company had been transferred. He expressed his thanks to the 
Company for all that they had done for him while they were a 
part of his battalion. 

May 4. The annual prize drill of the Company was held this 
date with a very large attendance. The platoon prize was won by 
the second platoon commanded by 2nd Lt. Frank F. Marchetti. 
The prize awards are listed under winners of prize drill medals for 
1923. The drill was one of the best ever held by the Richardson 
Light Guard, the proceeds going to the Company Fund. There 
were about three hundred persons present not including the mem- 
bers of the Company. 

May 30. The Company took part in the annual Memorial 
Day Exercises and made a splendid showing. A light lunch was 
served at the Armory following the parade. 

June 10. The Company marched to the Elks Home and es- 
corted the Lodge of Elks to the Park where the usual Flag Day Ex- 
ercises were held. There was a very good attendance of the Com- 
pany members. A light lunch was served at the Elks Hall follow- 
ing the exercises. 

July 10. Annual Encampment, July 10 to 23. 

October 17. The annual banquet was held this evening with 
about 250 present, and enjoyed an excellent dinner served by Ca- 
terer Grattan of Wakefield. Congressman Dallinger was the 
principal speaker and gave a very able address on the Protection 
of the United States from Foreign Aggression. Col. Gray of the 
182d Infantry spoke briefly and Rev. John H. Meheran gave the 
blessing. Capt. Quinn introduced as toastmaster, Harris M. Dol- 
beare, publisher of the Daily Item, who had, on numerous oc- 
casions, served at the R. L. G. banquets. Col. Edward J. Gihon 
gave a brief sketch of the accomplishments of the R. L. G. up to 
the present time, which was very interesting. The toastmaster 
awarded the prizes to both E Company members and the Fine 
members for the shoot which was held in connection with the an- 
niversary. 

Following the speaking the floor was cleared and dancing was 
enjoyed until midnight. 

273 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

November 26. There was a good attendance and much in- 
terest shown at the annual turkey shoot this date. The so called 
"lucky targets" were used and furnished much amusement for 
those taking part in the shoot. In all eleven turkeys were shot 
for and won by the Company and Fine members. 

MILITARY FUNERAL FOR CAPT. CHESLEY 

December 3. A military funeral was held this date for Capt. 
George W. Chesley, a former member of old Co. A, who was one 
of the most distinguished marksmen in the United States. The- 
members of his old rifle team in this Company, acted as pall. 
bearers. They were, Capt. James H. Keough of Wakefield, Capt. 
William R. Murphy of Hyde Park, George Durward of Woburn, 
Capt. Frank E. Gray of Reading, Major Edward J. Connell^^ 
and George W. Reid of Wakefield. 

December 20. A very enjoyable Christmas party was held 
this evening under the auspices of the Company. Gifts were dis- 
tributed to all of the Company members, of a humorous nature, 
and were the cause of much merriment. Games of various kinds- 
were played and a shoot was held, which was won by the second 
platoon. 

1924 

April 7. The annual Federal Inspection was held this date.. 
The inspecting officers thoroughly examined the building, the ac- 
counts of the Company and the supplies and found them in excel- 
lent condition. Extended and close order drills, bayonet combats, 
etc., found the Company in very high state of efficiency. At the 
conclusion of the inspection the inspecting officers expressed them- 
selves well pleased with the results shown, and for another year 
Wakefield's military unit lived up to its reputation as one of the 
best in the regiment. 

May 9. The annual prize drill of Company E was held this- 
date. Many friends and members of the Fine members Associa- 
tion attended. The prize winners will be found under the list 
of Prize Drill Winners. The judges were Major O'Brien of Som- 
eiville, Capt. Walker of Woburn, and Capt. Sullivan of Maiden. 

276 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Dancing followed the drill. The affair was very successful irt 
every way. 

ANNUAL CAMP TOUR 

July 5. The Company left Wakefield on the 7.12 train to 
Boston for its annual tour of camp duty to be held at Camp Dev- 
ens, Mass. The tour was very successful, the training showing in 
the improved appearance of the company upon its return to Wake- 
field on Saturday, July 19, 1924. 

October 15. The annual Field Day and Banquet was held 
this date. Although the attendance was not as large as in past 
years the banquet was as enjoyable as ever. Capt. Quinn in- 
troduced Harris M. Dolbeare as toastmaster, first expressing his 
appreciation and that of the Company for the co-operation given 
the Company during the past year by the Fine Members Asso- 
ciation. 

Harry I. Thayer, nominee for Congress in this district, was 
the principal speaker and gave a very interesting address on the 
part that Wakefield played in the past war. 

Col. Gray of the 182d Infantry spoke briefly on the accom- 
plishments of the regiment in rifle work in the past year. The 
closing feature of the evening was the presenting, by toastmaster 
Dolbeare, of the medals and prizes won by the Company and 
Fine Members shoot on the range last Saturday and Monday. 
The winners are listed under Winners of Shooting Medals. 

November 24. Many of the Fine Members Association, also 
the Company members took part in the annual turkey shoot at the 
armory this evening. The shoot was on the "lucky targets" and 
provided much fun for those who took part. There were six 
turkeys shot for and won in the competition. 

December 22. The annual Christmas party of Company E 
was held this evening following a short drill, after which a basket 
ball game was played between the two platoons. A boxing match 
and tin dipper fights were held and provided much sport. Lt. 
Carl 1. Cheever acted as Santa Claus and passed out humorous 
gifts to all the Company members. Everyone apparently had a 
very good time. 

277 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
1925 

January 16. The Ladies Auxiliary formed this date and the 
following officers were elected for 1925. President, Mrs. Dorothy 
Quinn; Treasurer, Mrs. Anna Brockbank; Secretary, Mrs. Mary 
A. Cheever. 

March 2. The annual Federal Inspection was held this date 
at the armory. There was a supper served at 6 o'clock, previous 
to the inspection, which was in the form of Past Commanders' 
night. Five of the former commanders of the Company attend- 
ed and received a hearty welcome as each was introduced by Capt. 
Quinn, the present commander of the Company. Owing to the 
lack of time there were no speeches by the guests. 

The past commanders present were Col. Edv/ard J. Gihon, 
Capt. Frank E. Gray, Col. John E. McMahon and Major Edward 
J. Connelly. 

The officers of the Fine Members Association were also guests. 
They were, Lt. Edward E. Hickey, President; Arthur C. Verge, 
Vice President; Harry i\. Simonds. Treasurer, and Ernest G. 
Willard, Secretary. Harris M. Dolbeare, publisher of the Daily 
Item, was also a guest. It was a very pleasant evening from start 
to finish. The Company lived up to its past reputation and re- 
ceived a very good rating from Capt. John E. Goodman, U. S. A. 
Federal Inspector, and Col. Arthur A. Hanson, State Inspector; 
Lt. Col. Henry D. Cormerais, Division Inspector arrived later and 
took part in the inspection. 

March 9. The Hope Chest, on which the Company had been 
selling subscriptions to raise money for the contemplated trip to 
the inaugural exercises at Washington, was drawn in the presence 
of the members of Company E by Col. Edward J. Gihon. The 
winner was Miss Eliza Surrette, 7 Murray St., Wakefield. 

March 26. The Fine Members Association had a shoot at 
the Armory this evening. A ten pound bird offered by Ernest G. 
Willard, secretary of the Fine Members Association, was won by 
Harry A. Simonds, treasurer of the Association. Lt. Hickey was 
second, William B. Feindel third. Major Samuel H. Brooks fourth. 
Merchandise prizes were awarded in the last named classes. 

278 



History OfRiciiardson Light Guard 

March 12. The annual election of officers of the Fine Mem- 
bers Association was held this date. The officers elected are. 
President, Lt. Edward E. Hickey; Vice President, Arthur C. 
Verge; Treasurer, Harry A. Simonds; Secretary, Ernest G. Wil- 
lard. 

April 29. The Ladies' Auxiliary presented a two-act comedy 
entitled, "A Hole in the Fence", at the High School auditorium. 
The play was very successful and was enjoyed by all present, 
followed by dancing at the Armory. 

May 30. Co. E participated this date in the annual Memo- 
rial Day exercises of the town. There was a very good atten- 
dance of the members and the Company looked very well in the 
parade which was reviewed by the marshal at the Library on the 
return to the armory. Refreshments were served at the Armory. 

June 17. The Company left the Armory in auto busses for 
Charlestown this date to take part in the Bunker Hill parade. 
Many favorable comments were heard along the line of march re- 
garding the splendid appearance of the Wakefield soldiers. It 
was estimated that about 1 500 people took part in the parade. 

DEFENSE DAY 

July 4. All men were present at the Armory this date for 
the national Defense Day assembly. Capt. Quinn was much 
pleased with the 100 per cent attendance of the Company. 

July 10. The Company left this date for its annual tour oT 
Guty at Camp Devens. The usual routine drill and tactical 
problems were accomplished during the camp tour without any un- 
usual occurrences. The Company performed the duty very well 
and presented the appearance of veterans upon their return to 
Wakefield on July 25. 

October 16. The 74th Anniversary Banquet was held at the 
Armory this date. Capt. Quinn spoke briefly and introduced 
Harris M. Dolbeare as toastmaster. Mr. Dolbeare had proved in 
the past years to possess exceptional talent as a toastmaster and 
the speakers were humorously presented in a manner which 
pleased the audience. Rev. Wm. H. Flynn delivered the principal 
address and was given hearty applause at the conclusion. Lt. 

279 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Col. Moyse, in the absence of Col. Gray, responded for the regi- 
ment and paid a fitting tribute to the local soldiers. Shooting 
prizes were awarded at the conclusion of the speaking. 

December 21. The members of Company E spent a very 
pleasant evening at their annual Christmas Party on this date 
and were the recipients of many humorous Christmas gifts which 
were presented by Lt. Cheever. Boxing and comedy sketches of 
various kinds occupied the remainder of the evening, the affair 
proving a social success. 

1926 

INDOOR RIFLE COMPETITION 

February 26. The series of three State Indoor Rifle Com- 
petition was completed today. The first match was held on Jan- 
uary 22, the second on February 13. 

FINE MEMBERS 

March 25. A committee of the Fine Members Association 
was held this date with a very small attendance. Routine busi- 
ness was transacted and the old officers of the association were re 
elected: President, Edward E. Hickey; Vice President, Arthur C 
Verge; Secretary, Ernest G. Willard; Treasurer, Harry A. 
Simonds. 

A committee was appointed to act jointly with a committee 
from Company E, to make plans for the observance of the 75th 
anniversary of the Richardson Light Guard. 



PRIZE DRILL 

April 30. The annual prize drill and dance was held this 
evening under the direction of Capt. Thomas J. Quinn. A platoon 
drill preceded the competitive drill and the second platoon, com- 
manded by Lt. Frank F. Marchetti was awarded the honors. The 
judges were Capt. Dennis P. Sullivan of Maiden and Lt. Norman 
Duncan of Woburn. Dancing followed the drill. 

280 



^ 









History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ANNUAL CAMP TOUR 

July 10. The Company left the Armory at 8.30 a. m. and en- 
trained at 8.36 for Boston, thence to Camp Devens. Arriving at 
11.35 a. m. the Company occupied the same barracks as last year 
at the Cor. of 4th Ave. and 12th Street, barracks No. 3066. The 
remainder of the day was spent policing in and about the bar- 
racks, and the cleaning of equipment. 

Sunday, July 18. Regular Church Services. Many rel- 
atives and friends visited camp today, reminding one of the vast 
throngs of visitors during the war. A little excitement was fur- 
nished the visitors about 3 o'clock when a fire broke out in the 
engineers area and burned the building completely. A division 
review was held on the main parade grounds, witnessed by a very 
large crowd. 

Monday, July 19. Brigade combat exercise. The brigade 
marched to Shirley and marched back in the direction of Camp 
Devens. From then on an advance guard problem was worked 
out with Company E acting as advance guard, the remainder of 
our battalion forming a reserve. When the main gate of the 
camp was reached the brigade was halted and the advance guard 
formed three march outposts. After the noon halt the march 
outposts were withdrawn and the advance guard taken up again 
until the quartermaster's area was reached where the brigade 
bivouaced for the night. Outposts were stationed at various 
points and withdrawn about 10 p. m. 

After breakfast, Tuesday morning, the Company marched 
back to quarters. The complete division was reviewed Tuesday 
night by the English Ambassador. It was remarkable that none 
of the men suffered any ill effects from the intense heat of the day. 

On Wednesday another Division review was tended to Gov. 
Fuller, the weather continuing very hot. 

Friday evening, July 23, at retreat, Sergt. Daniel Galvin pre- 
sented Capt. Thomas J. Quinn with a Sam Brown belt and a beau- 
tiful saber as a testimonial from the members of the Company. 

Saturday the Company returned to Wakefield. It was the 
opinion of all the members of the Company that this was, by far, 
the most pleasant camp tour we have held in the past six years. 
282 



ROSTER OF CO. E, 182nd INFANTRY, M. N. G. 
September I, 1926 



Capt. Thomas J. Quinn 
1st Lt. Carl I. Cheever 
2ncl Lt. Frank F. Marchetti 

Sergeants 
Dolbeai-e, Richard B. 
Galvin, Daniel H. 
Dingle, John T. 
AVhite, Walter C. 
Wenzel. Merritt 
Meredith, John F. 
O'Leary, John J. 

Corporals 
Martin, John B. 
Barrett, James J. 
Denley, Roy L. 
Gould, Frank J. 
Franklin, Neil 

Ist-Class Privates 
Leone, Guidino 
Meuse, Benoit A. 
Pizzano, Ernest E. 
Procurat, John 
Sheppard, Albert 
Rich, Frank 
Roby, Harry B. 
Vielick, A. Tony 
Wade, Roy 

Privates 
Bennett, Elmer F. 
Cameron, David 
Cavalieri, Paul 
Cottreau, Clifford 
Cottreau, John O. 
Cucurullo, Charles 
Gushing, Ernest E. 



Gushing, Raymond 
Davis, Merton E. 
French, John 
Gallagher, Francis 
Geary, Frank 
Hall, George 
Hubbard, Alfred J. 
Leone, Sebastino 
Martin, John W. 
Messa, Michael 
Melanson, Parker J. 
Melanson, Harold J. 
Migliori, Rosario 
Meuse, Daniel 
Meuse, Frederick A. 
Moschella, Joseph 
Pizzano, Charles 
Randall, Wyman S. 
Richard, Thomas 
Robbins, Frank J. 
Serrintino, Constantino' 
Shaw, John T. 
Storti, Joseph 
Tedesco, Clement 
Tennoy, Leslie J. 
Woods, Bertram 
Jacobs, .John H. 
Lloyd, Ralph P. 
Beane, Raymond J. 
Alger, William A. 
Collura, Onofrio 
Paladino, Mario 
Clark, John L. 
Fredette, Joseph L.. 
Wengen, Frank J., 



285 



CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO 

ANNIVERSARY PLANS 

It was at the annual meeting of the Fine Members Association 
of the Richardson Light Guard, March 25, 1926, that a vote was 
passed authorizing the appointment of a committee to make plans 
for a suitable observance of the 75th anniversary. Lt. Edward 
E. Hickey, president of the association appointed the following 
members of the committee : 

Lt. Charles E. Walton Capt. Charles A. Cheney 

Solon O. Richardson, Toledo Capt. Frank E. Gray 

Harry G. Robinson Lt. Stanley B. Dearborn 

William W. King J. Theodore Whitney 

Michael J. Hurton Charles N. Winship 

Maj. Edward J. Connelly Frank H. Hackett 

Dr. Curtis L. Sopher Henry A. Feindel 

Col. John H. McMahon Dr. J. William O'Connell 

Col. Edward J. Gihon Maj. James H. Keough 

Col. Charles F. Woodward Harris M. Dolbeare 

Maj. George H. Taylor Capt. John L. Downing 

Maj. Samuel H. Brooks Maj. Fred H. Rogers 

Capt. George M. Tompson Albert D. Oxley 
Capt. Clinton H. Stearns 

It was voted that officers of the association also serve on the 
committee: President E. E. Hickey, Vice President Arthur C. 
Verge, Secretary Ernest G. Willard and Treasurer Harry A. Si- 
monds. 

Capt. Thomas J. Ouinn of Co. E, I82nd Inl, M. N. G., was 
asked to serve and appoint a committee from the company. The 
following were appointed: Capt. Quinn, 1st Lt. Carl I. Cheever, 
2nd Lt. Frank F. Marchetti, 1st Sgt. John J. L3^ons, Sgt. Andrew 
E. Waters, Sgt. Richard B. Dolbeare, Sgt. Daniel H. Galvin, Sgt. 
John T. Dingle, Sgt. Walter C. White, Sgt. Merritt Wenzel, Corp 
John F. Meredith, Corp. Roy L. Denley, Corp. James J. Barrett, 
Corp. Frank J. Gould, Corp. George Hall, and Corp. John 
Martin. During the months preceding the final arrangements 
the enlistment terms of 1st Sgt. Lyons, Sgt. Galvin and Sgt. Din- 
gle expired, but they have since served as Fine Members. Sgt. 
Dolbeare was promoted to 1st Sgt., Corp. Meredith was appointed 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

sergeant. Sgt. Waters has been transferred to the 101st Regt. Inf., 
and has been commissioned 2nd lieutenant. 

The committees representing the Fine Members and active 
members organized with L.t. Walton, chairman; Mr. Willard, sec- 
retary; Mr. King assistant secretary, and Mr. Simonds, treasurer. 
Frequent meetings have been held and many sub-committees have 
taken charge of details. 




state Armory, Wakefield, at Time of 75th Anniversary 



During the Spring sessions of the annual town meeting an ap- 
propriation of |5,000 was made to provide a suitable monument 
in memory of Wakefield's soldiers, sailors and marines who served 
in the Spanish-American War. The town appointed a committee 
of five to assume charge of the erection and dedication of the 
monument : Col. Edward J. Gihon, Maj. Edward J. Connelly, 
Commander J. Warren Poland of H. M. Warren Post 12, G. A. R., 
John J. Round and Arthur L. Evans. Commander Poland died 
before the committee organized. In view of the close relation- 
ship, between the Richardson Light Guard and the Spanish War 
veterans, it was suggested that a joint celebration be held, combin- 
ing the dedication of the monument and the 75th anniversary. It 

285 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

was also noted that a reunion of the United Spanish War veterans 
would be planned in connection with the dedication and R. L. G. 
event. These suggestions were adopted and joint sessions of com- 
mittees representing the Spanish War veterans, the town commit- 
tee and the R. L. G. committee have been held in order to prepare 
a creditable observance. Col. Gihon, as chairman of the town 
committee, and prominent as a past national and state commander 
of the Spanish War veteran has directed much of the preliminary 
work in co-operation with Chairman Walton. Capt. Quinn, the 
commander of the present company was chosen chief marshal. 

Early in the discussions it was decided to publish a history 
of the Richardson Light Guard, covering the quarter-century 
period from the time of the fiftieth anniversary to the close of the 
75th year. This committee comprised Lt. Edward E. Mickey, 
Maj. Edward J. Connelly, iVlaj. John H. McMahon, Capt. Frank 
E. Gray and Pvt. W. S. Randall, clerk of Company E. The 
committee has found the task difficult, but trust that the printed 
volume may prove interesting and worth the efforts in recording 
in chronological order the more important events of the past twen- 
ty-five years in which varied activities of the Richardson Light 
Guard have transpired. In a number of instances it has been 
impossible to secure desired information from those who were re- 
lied upon for co-operation, for various reasons, and efforts have 
been made to verify the material appearing herein from sources as 
nearly authentic as possible. 

Owing to the short time available in preparing the history, 
events during years previous to the World War have been con- 
densed and used in chronological order, so that much of the in- 
teresting narrative is omitted. The material of the World War 
story has been cut down, for a volume in itself would be needed 
to properly narrate those stirring events. 

The history committee is indebted to many friends who have 
extended courtesies and otherwise expressed their interest in the 
work. Included among the number, special recognition is accord- 
ed Miss May Bloom (Adjutant General's Office) and Miss Helen 
Dinan, both of whom prepared much of the material of the rosters; 
Miss iMary L. Hurley of the Item staff, who did a great deal of 
the typing of the story; Lt. Edward E. Hickey who compiled the 
rifle records and most of the chronological events leading to the 
World War; Harris M. Dolbeare who gave valuable assistance to 
the committee, and Maj. Edward J. Connelly who furnished most 
of the war data. 



286 



CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE 

SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY 

The Richardson Light Guard's diamond anniversary was ob- 
served with fitting ceremonies jointly with the dedication of the 
Spanish War Veterans' Hiker Monument on Tuesday, October 12, 
1926, Columbus Day. 

The day will never be forgotten by anyone who attended the 
ceremonies, for the weather was ideal — a typical Fall day, with 
cloudless sky, brisk breezes and perfect Indian Summer atmos- 
phere. It was happily mentioned at the time that the day was 
"made to order", for better weather could not have been desired. 

Target Shoot 
The first event of the day was a target shoot early in the 
forenoon at Camp Curtis Guild. For years this custom of hold- 
ing a target shoot has attracted wide attention, and the atten- 
dance on this occasion surpassed all records. Members of 
Company E competed for medals and prizes, as in previous years. 
Lt. Edward E. Hickey was range officer for the Fine Members and 
made a full possible score of 50, in the distinguished expert class. 
The competition aroused much interest among old-time rivals at 
the range, and equal interest was manifested by members of Com- 
pany E, for excellent scores were made. In the latter contests, 
Lt. Carl I. Cheever won both the Gihon medal and the Carpenter 
"Best Shot" medal, the latter in the expert class. Capt. Quinn 
won second prize, the Kingman medal, and the third prize, the 
Cheney medal, was won by Private Cucurullo. 

Military Parade 

The parade started on schedule time at two o'clock in the 
afternoon and was one of the finest military^ parades ever held in 
Greater Boston. 

The parade was fifteen minutes in passing a given point and 
long enough to require four bands — Ives', the Salem Cadet, the 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Lynn Cadet and the 101st Engineers. It is interesting to note 
that the Salem Cadet band and its veteran bandmaster, Jean M. 
Missud, played for the Richardson Light Guard when it celebrated 
its 50th anniversary in 1901, and for many of the famous Fall 
musters and dress parades of by-gone days. 

Starting from the lower square, near the armory, the proces- 
sion followed Main and Chestnut streets, North avenue, Avon 
street, Main street, again to Park street, passing the reviewing 
stand on the Rockery; traversed Park st to Pleasant and continued 
along Pleasant street to White avenue; thence back to the Rock- 
ery, via White avenue and Main streets. In Wakefield Square 
and along all side streets it was viewed by thousands of people, 
many in automobiles. 

Capt. Thomas J. Quinn of the R. L. G. was chief marshal of 
the parade and was assisted by Maj. Edward J. Connelly and Lt. 
Edward E. Hickey, former members of the R. L. G., and Lt. Rich- 
ard J. Connelly, W. H. S. Cadets, son of Maj. Connelly. All were 
mounted. 

Col. Gihon's staflf comprised many notable officers and Span- 
ish War veterans from various parts of the State. The list in- 
cluded: 

Major-Gen. William E. Stopford, mayor of Beverly; Maj.- 
Gen. Walter E. Lombard of Arlington, M. N. G., retired; Col. 
William S. Youngman, state treasurer; Col. Joseph Frothingham 
oi Boston; Col. Arthur Rowe of Winchester, a Canadian veteran; 
Col. Warren E. Sweetser of Neponset, Col. John H. McMahon of 
Wakefield, a former commander of old Co. A; Past Dept. Com- 
mander of U. S. W. V. Henry McCammon of Lowell, Past Dept. 
Commander William C. Hogan of Cambridge, Past Dept. Com- 
mander William J. O'Brien of Boston, Past Dept. Commander 
Charles A. Flannagan, Maj. John F. Barrett of Boston, Maj. P. J. 
Cannon of Clinton, Maj. D. J. Murphy of Natick, Maj. Waugh 
U. S. Army; Maj. James H. Keough of Wakefield, Capt. Richard 
R. Flynn of Winthrop (as chief of staflf) ; Capt. Clifford Hamilton 
or Waltham, Capt. William Fairweather of Medford, Capt. 
Thomas Quinlan of Somerville, Capt. Whiting of Boston, Capt 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Tobey of Lynn, Charles W. Parker, commandant of the Soldiers' 
1-iome; Capt. Horace B. Parker of Boston, Judge Philip J. Mc- 
Cook of the New York Supreme Court, a former Co. A veteran; 
Lt. Andrew Fyfe of Peabody, representing the Veterans of the 
Foreign Wars, Lt. William J. Fitzgerald of Wakefield, representing 
Corp. Nelson Post of American Legion; Lt. Anthony Carson of 
Boston, Joseph Scott, late of the U. S. Navy, of Cambridge; Sgt. 
Roy Tice of the U. S. Marine Corps, Selectmen Charles F. Young, 
Thomas G. Dignan and Arthur E. Newcomb; Maj. Frederic M 
Whitney, Capt. Thomas F. Jackson of Marlboro, Capt. Bertie E 
Grant of Chelsea, Lt.-Col. Franklin A. Taylor of Marlboro, Capt 
Martin J. Healey of Clinton, Lt. Gardner W. Allen of Boston, Lt 
Dennis F. Bowen of Boston and Lt. William F. Tolman of 
Chelsea. 

The parade, representing various branches of service, with 
cavalry, infantry, medical detachment. Marines, etc., made a re- 
markable showing. The formation of the procession was as fol- 
lows: 

Platoon of Police, Chief James J. Pollard. 

Chief Marshal, Capt. Thomas J. Quinn and staff. 

Salem Cadet Band, Jean M. Missud, leader. 

Headquarters Troop, 110th Cavalry, M. N. G. 

2nd Battalion, 182nd Infantry, M. N. G. 

Marine Corps Reserve. 

Medical Detachment, 182nd Inf. M. N. G. 

Wakefield High School Battalion. 

Corp. Charles F. Parker Camp 39, U. S. W. V. 

Corp. Harry E. Nelson Post 63, American Legion. 

Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf., N. G. (World War Veterans). 

Richardson Light Guard Fine Members Association. 

Horace M. Warren Camp 34, Sons of Union Veterans of the 
Civil War. 

Girl Scouts. 

Boy Scouts. 

Upon return to the Rockery, the marching organizations 
formed on three sides of the Rockery plot, the Spanish War Vet- 

289 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

ferans having the post of honor at the front, and at least 2000 per- 
-sons were within sight and hearing of the exercises. 

Dedication of Monument 

Col. Edward J. Gihon, former commander of the Richardson 
Light Guard, and chairman of the committee appointed by the 
town to procure and dedicate the monument, presided at these im- 
pressive exercises. Col. Gihon occupied a deserved place on the 
day's program for he was commander of the R. L. G. in the Span- 
ish War; was the first commander and organizer of Corp. Charles 
F. Parker Camp, United Spanish War Veterans, and later was 
honored with both state and national offices of commander-in-chief 
■of the U. S. W. V. 

The exercises opened with an eloquent invocation by Rev. F. 
'J. Halloran, rector of St. Joseph's Church. The monument was 
presented to the town by Col. Gihon, on behalf of the committee 
and was accepted by Selectman Charles F. Young, a World War 
veteran, on behalf of the citizens of Wakefield. Mr. Young then 
placed the custody of the monument in the hands of Corporal 
Charles F. Parker Camp 39, U. S. W. V., Capt. Julian L. Kelley. 
commander. Commander Kelley spoke in appreciation of the 
honor conferred on the Spanish War veterans. State Treasurer 
William S. Youngman, a veteran of both the Spanish War and 
World War, represented Governor Alvan T. Fuller in extending 
the greetings of the Commonwealth, and a patriotic address fol- 
lowed by Hon. Charles F. McCarthy, a prominent Spanish War 
veteran. Vocal selections were sung by Mrs. Gertrude Connelly 
Burke, and the combined bands played "America the Beautiful". 
The exercises closed with a fervent benediction by Rev. Austin 
Rice, D. D., pastor of the First Congregational Church. 

The town monument committee consisted of Col. Edward J. 
Gihon, Maj. Edward J. Connelly and former Selectmen Arthur L. 
Evans and John J. Round. Commander J. Warren Poland of H. 
M. Warren Post 12, G. A. R., served on the committee until his 
death, a few months previous to the dedication. 



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History Of Richardson Light Guard 
Evening Parade 

An evening parade followed on the Park by a battalion 
•of the 182nd Regt. with companies of infantry from Waltham, 
Woburn, Everett and Wakefield. A detachment of Marines 
also participated, making a fitting climax of the afternoon's cere- 
monies. The consolidated bands, under direction of Jean M. 
Missud of the Salem Cadet Band, furnished music. 
Reunion 

Visiting organizations were provided with luncheons in halls 
and church vestries following the ceremonies. A reunion of the 
6lh Mass. Regt. Spanish War veterans took place at the town 
hall, when a banquet, speeches and an entertainment afforded 
pleasure for visitors. 

R. L. G. Banquet 

The closing feature was the banquet in the State Armory 
when the Richardson Light Guard festivities took place. It was 
the final event of a most enjoyable celebration. As in the case of 
the day's entire program the arrangements were smoothly carried 
out, and many compliments were heard from visitors relative to 
the unusual fact that a most happily planned schedule had been 
fulfilled without interruption. About 400 persons attended the 
banquet, which was served by the Grattan Baking Company of 
Wakefield, caterers. Music was furnished by the Salem Cadet 
Orchestra. The Armory was very beautifully decorated for the 
occasion, with electrical effects amid flags, streamers and orna- 
mental decorations. 

Capt. Thomas J. Quinn opened the after-dinner exercises and 
in welcoming the guests he referred especially to the moral and 
financial support accorded the Richardson Light Guard during his 
term of office; and in fact throughout three-quarters of a century 
He paid a tribute to the Fine Members' Association for their loyal- 
ty. Capt. Quinn introduced as toastmaster, Harris M. Dolbeare, 
publisher of the Wakefield Daily Item. 

State Treasurer William S. Youngman represented Governor 

Fuller and congratulated Wakefield on its splendid record in 

marksmanship and its military history. He considered the day's 

program as "the best conducted celebration" he had ever attended. 

292 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Col. Albert C. Gray, commander of the 182nd Regt. stated 
that the Richardson Light Guard was always above the average 
in its work, and that the company was deserving of the support so 
generously given by citizens of Wakefield. He was proud of the 
company and of the town's prestige in military affairs. 

Judge Philip J. McCook of New York, a Company A veteran 
of 1898. who had come to Wakefield to attend the reunion of his 
regiment, extended greetings to his former company. 

Congressman Frederick W. Dallinger, who had frequently 
attended R. L. G. anniversary banquets emphasized the importance 
of military training in times of peace and praised the work of 
the National Guard, which he considered very important. 

Selectman Charles F. Young responded for the town and 
gave an interesting brief review of the history of the Richardson 
Light Guard. 

Col. Gihon took occasion to e.xpress his appreciation of the 
co-operation extended in making the day's program a success, and 
voiced the sentiment of Spanish War veterans in suitably recog- 
nizing the services of enlisted men. 

A message from S. O. Richardson of Toledo, who was unable 
to attend, conveyed greetings and expressed his interest in a very 
substantial manner. 

Capt. Quinn concluded the exercises by extending sincere 
thanks to all who had made the celebration a success. 

Two invited guests were unable to attend, Maj. Gen. Edward 
L. Logan of World War fame and Brig. Gen. Alfred F. Foote, 
State Commissioner of Public Safety. 

General Co-operation 
Besides the committee from the Fine Members' Association, 
the town monument committee and a committee from Corp. 
Charles F. Parker Camp 39, U. S. W. V. met frequently in joint 
sessions. Harmony prevailed in these meetings, for all worked 
together in the interests of the town's notable celebration, fully 
realizing that the Richardson Light Guard was recognized as a 
town institution, and that any arrangements made would be conge- 

293 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

iiial to Wakefield people and their visitors. Expenses of the cele- 
bration were met largely by popular subscription, nearly 1 1,000 
having been raised by the Fine Members' Association. Expenses 
incident to the dedication of the monument were paid from the 
town appropriation of |5000 and the Spanish War veterans 
raised funds to defray expenses connected with the reunion and 
other incidentals. As on other similar occasions, Wakefield 
people generously responded and co-operated to a remarkable de- 
gree in making the affair a success. 



294 



-ROSTERS- 

OF THE 

Richardson Light Quard 

From September I, 1902 to September 1, 1926 

including separate lists of the compamj in the 

IPorld IDar and the State Quard compani^ 



Rosters of the Richardson Light Guard 



In presenting the following rosters of the R. L. G., it has been necessary 



to condense the material, and 

adopted for convenience: 

e, enlisted 

d, discharged 

res, resigned 

re, reenlisted 



the following abbreviations have been:. 

tr, transferred 

con. ser., continuous service 

com, commissioned 



Company A, 6th Regiment 

Massachusetts Volunteer Militia 

(See front of book for succeeding military designations) 



Name 

Abbott, Ernest G. 
Acliorn, Carl W. 
Akers, Gilbert L. 
Aldrich, Clifton H. 
Altieri, Peter C. 
Anderson, John H. 
Andrew, Edward M. 
Archibald, Sidney 
Bagley, Thomas W. 
Bancroft, John R. 
Barrett, John F. 
Barton, John T. 
Barstow, Roy H. 
Bennett, Elmer F. 
Bennett, George A. 
Bennett, Pierre B. 
Bergstrom, Axel E. 
Bishop, Jerdcn E. 
Bisho)', AVillinm E. 
Blanchanl, (U-nvge L. 
Bolster, Walter H. 
Borthwick, Arthur H. 
Bourgeois, Samuel 
Breen, Frank H. 
Brockbank, Harvey G. 



Brennan, John G. 
Brown, Foster 
Bryant, Arthur J. 
Burbine, John A. 
Burbine, William 
Burrage, William F. 
Calkin, Pitt R. 
Cameron, William A. 
Carr, Michael 
Casey, Thomas F. 





Einlisted 


Discharged Rank 




Aug 


19, 1901 


Oct. 


30, 1901 




June 


20, 1910 


Mar. 


20, 1911 




Oct. 


30, 1902 


Apr. 


10, 1908 




Apr. 


10, 1901 


Feb. 


10, 1902 




Aug. 


24, 1912 


Aug. 


24, 1915 




Feb. 


1, 1915 


Mar. 


10, 1916 




Nov. 


2, 1915 


July 


1, 1916 




May 


18, 1903 


June 


10, 1904 




June 


6, 1914 


Aug. 


5, 1917 




Feb. 


20, 1901 


Mar. 


12, 1911 cpl., sgt. 




May 


23, 1910 


Oct. 


20. 1910 




May 


9, 1900 


May 


9, 1909 cpl. 




Oct. 


1, 1904 


Sept. 


30, 1907 mus. 




July 


12, 1900 


J uly 


12. 1914 




Mar. 


19, 1901 


June 


10, 1001 




Aug. 


26, 1907 


Aug. 


10, 1910 




Mar. 


20, 1908 


June 


10, 1908 




Dec. 


16, 1907 


May 


29, 1908 




Dec. 


23, 1907 


July 


30, 1908 




May 


18. 1904 


Sept. 


30, 1009 




Oct. 


13, 1902 


Apr. 


10, 1903 




Jan. 


4, 1909 


Mar. 


30. 1900 




May 


30, 1902 


June 


9, 190f5 mus. 




Oct. 


26, 1903 


Nov. 


30, 1007 




e Feb. 2, 1891; continuous service to August, ] 


.909 


Spanish- American 


War ; 


Cpl., Sgt., 1st Sgt., 1st 


Lt. 


May 


19, 1902; res. 


d Nov., 1909. 




Oct. 


26, 1903 


Oct. 


26, 1907 




May 


18, 1903 


Dec. 


10, 1003 




Dec. 


28, 1903 


Dec. 


2s. loo;-) 




June 


20, 1910 


Fel). 


20. 1011 




May 


10, 1904 


Tune 


0. 1006 




Jan. 


17, 1910 


Auu'. 


0, 1012 




Oct. 


31, 1908 


• July 


15, 1010 




Oct. 


14, 1907 


Sept. 


30, 1000 




May 


15, 1903 


Oct. 


21), 1003 




June 


19, 1905 


Apr. 


10, 1907 





History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Name 

Chesley, George W. 



Chubbuck, Frank G. 
Collins, Louis E. 
Collins, Richard L. 
Connelly, Frank D. 
Cobb, Herbert W. 
Coombs, Chester H. 
Cosman, Richard A. 
Cox, Harold C. 
Cloutier, Joseph T. 
Crandell, Chauncey 
Crane, Clarence P. 
Creagh, Harry G. 
Creedon, Daniel C. 
Croke, Thomas M. 



Cronin, Jeremiah J. 
Crouin, Patrick J. 
Crosby, Joseph W. 
Cummings, Clarence C. 
Currier, Harold R. 
Curtin, Thomas 
Cuzner, Herbert J. 
Dean, Bayard C. 
Derby, Joseph M. 
DeRoche, J. Edward 
Desmond. James J. 
Devlin, John F. 
Dillon, Joseph J. 
Dingle, Manuel 



Enlisted Disohargrert Kank 

e Jan. IG, 1S03; re Jan. 16, 1897, exp. of term Jan. 
10. 189S; Spanish War, re Feb. 22^ 1898; con. ser. to 



July 31, 1901; re July 31, 



1902; d May 19, 1906; mus. 
1, 1916 



Feb. 1, 1915 July 

June 18, 1901 Apr. 21, 1902 

Mar. 2, 1903 Mar. . 2, 1906 

Jan. 4, 1909 Apr. 20, 1911 

Mav 18, 1903 May 18. 190-1 

July 31, 1901 Mav 8. 1903 

Apr. 14, 1902 Nov. 30, 1908 cpl. 

Mav 17. 1907 May 7, 1910 

May 12,1908 Oct. 30.1908 

Mar. 2, 1903 Feb. 20, 1905 

Sept. 30, 1901 Feb. 10, 1902 

Jan. 12, 1901 Dec. 20, 1902 

Oct. 19, 1914 June 20, 1916 

e Co. H, 6th Mass. U. S. V.; Spanish War; d Jan. 

21, 1899; re in Co. H as Corp., March 4, 1899; d 

Aug., 1900; re April 9, 1901; d Feb. 10, 1904. 

Feb. 18, 1901 Aug. 21, 1908 cpl. 

Mar. 11, 1910 Jan. 10, 1911 

Dec. 30, 1907 Aug'. 29, 1908 

May 12, 1908 May 12, 1911 

Mar. 20, 1911 Mar. 20, 1914 

Mar. 2, 1903 Oct. 29, 1904 

Aug. 14, 1902 May 18, 1907 

Mar. 20, 1903 Jan. 20, 1906 cpl., sgt. 

Oct. 20,1913 Oct. 10,1918 

May 23, 1910 Aug 10, 1911 

Mar. 12, 1905 July 10, 1909 

Mav 19. 1913 Dec. 21, 1914 

May 18, 1906 Nov. 30, 1907 

e Mav 12, 1893; d Dec. 29, 1894; re June 5, 1895; d 

.Jan. 20, 1897; re Feb. 20, 1899; served in Spanish 

War in U. S. Navy on board the U. S. monitor, 

Terror ; (e April 26, 1898 to d Dec. 12, 1898) ; re Feb. 

20, 1900; re Feb. 21, 1901; d Feb. 10, 1904; corp. 



Doucette, Albert J. 


Mar. 31, 1917 


May 28, 1917 


Doucette, Edward S. 


Apr. 29,1907 


Jan. 10, 1908 


Doucette, James E. 


June 2, 1913 


Feb. 20, 1915 


Downes, Blden M. 


Sept. 1, 1910 


June 16, 1913 cpl. 


Duane, Daniel J. 


Mar. 9, 1908 


Aug. 10, 1910 


Duff, Myles J. 


May 12, 1908 


Sept. 30,1916 


Duff, Peter J. 


June 23,1913 


Oct. 30, 1914 


Dulong, Edward 


Oct. 1, 1904 


June 9, 1906 


Dulong, Enos 


May 12, 1908 


Aug. 10, 1909 


Durward, William A. 


Mav 29, 1906 


May 29, 1907 cook 


Dwyer, Richard M. 


May 29. 1911 


May 29, 1912 cpl. 




Killed in France during AVorld War as Lieutenant. 


JEames, Clarence G. 


Oct. 12, 1904 


Oct. 12, 1907 


JEames, Hugh H. 


Mar. 20. 1911 


Aug. 9, 1912 


Eaton, Wilfred P. 


Sept. 30, 1901 


Oct. 31, 1906 


Evans, Robert T. 


Mav 7, 1904 


Aug. 30, 1906 


Fahey, John F. 


Aug. 26, 1907 


July 10, 1909 


Fahey, Matthew E. 


July 6, 1912 


Jan. 20, 1915 


Farnham, George E. 


Aug. 26,1907 


June 30, 1913 cpl., sgt. 


Faunce, James E. 


June 19, 1905 


Apr. 10, 1907 


-Fein del, Henry A. 


e May 18, 1893; ( 


1 May 18, 1896; re May 12, 1898; 




Spanish-American 


War, Co. A. 6th Mass. Vol., May 




12, 1898, to Jan. 


21, 1899; in action at Quanica, 




Porto Rico, July 


26, 1898; re May 8, 1902; d May 




9. 1903. 




Fiudlay, Peter G. 


Oct. 9, 1911 


June 20, 1916 cpl. 


Pindlay, William E. 


Mar. 11, 1907 


Mar. 11, 1914 mus. 


Field, Edwin F. 


May 23, 1906 


Feb. 10, 1908 


Finneran, Edward J. 


Aug. 2, 1916 


Mar. 24, 1917 


Flagg, Levi 


Julv 7. 1915 


July 1, 1916 


Fleming, Robert A. 


Sept. 27, 1915 


Dec. 20, 1915 


Foley, Frederick G. 


June 18,1911 


Oct. 30, 1913 


Foster, Robert P. 


Oct. 22, 1906 


Feb. 28, 1907 



297 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Name 

Fowler, John 
Gammons, Greorge B. 
Geoghegan, Charles J. 
Gerry, Fred B. 
Gibson, Robert E. 
Glynn, John W. 
Godfrey, Harry G. 
Godfrey, Robert F. 
Goodwin, Carl I. 
Gould, Clarence A. 
Grozier, Herbert F. 
Gray, Frank E. 



Hadley, William G. 
Haley, Jesse A. 



Haley, William A. 



Hall, Albert F. 
Hanley, John C. 
Hanley, Thomas 
Hannaford, Walter A. 
Hanright, Cecil G. 
Harrie, Charles 
Hastings, William M. 
Healey, John F. 
Heneghen, Patrick 
Heningar, Henry A. 
Hickey, William A. 
Hinckley, Albert G., Jr. 
Hinkley, Edwin H. 
Hinkley, Frank G., Jr. 
Holt, Frank 
Hunt, Edgar L. 
Hunt, Walter G. 

Jaquith, James J. 
Jones, James A. 
Keady, James E. 
Kean, Frederick C. 
Kelley, William H. 
Keene, Ervin L. 
Kennedy, Edward J. 
Kenney, George W. 
Keough, James H. 



June 
Apr. 



Enlisted 

6, 1909 
30, 1900 



June 27, 1907 



Feb. 
Apr. 
May 
Dec. 



9, 1903 
25, 1901 
23, 1910 
12, 1905 
18, 1903 

4, 1908 
10, 1904 



Dischargred 

June 6, 1912 
10, 1903 
30, 1907 
12, 1909 



Sept. 
Nov. 
Feb. 



Sept. 22, 1908 



May 23, 1913 

Apr. 5, 1910 epl. 

Oct. 20, 1903 
May 4, 1908 Oct. 30. 1908 

May 10, 1904 Dec. 30, 1904 

Nov. 10, 1913 Dec. 2, 1915 

e Jan. 19, 1886; continuous service to 1902; Cpl., Sgt.,. 
Spanish-American War, Co. A, 6th Mass. U. S. Vol. ; 
mentioned in Special Order for conspicuous gallantry 
at Quanica, Porto Rico, July 26, 1898; 2nd Lt. Jan. 
18, 1897; 1st Lt. July 6, 1898; 6th Regt. Adjt Aug. 9' 
to Sept. 15, 1898; Capt Co. K, 6th Mass. U. S. VoU 
Sept. 2, 1898; mus. out Jan. 21, 1899; 2nd Lt. Co. A. 
6th M. V. M., 1899: 1st Lt. Apr. 14, 1899; Capt. July 
12, 1899; res. d Feb., 1902. 
Oct. 27, 1902 Feb. 10, 1903 

e Dec. 20, 1896: mus. U. S. Vols. Co. A, 6th, May 12^ 
1898; Spanish War; d March 10, 1899; re Jan. 12, 
1901; d Jan. 12. 1903; corp. 
e Jan. 20, 1896; mus. U. S. Vols. Co. A, 6th, May 12,. 

1898, Spanish War; corp. July 13, 1898; d Jan. 20,- 

1899, sergt; re Feb. 27, 1899, 1st sergt. ; re April 30,. 
1900; d May 10, 1902. 



Mar. 


31, 1917 


Aug. 


5, 1917 


May 


18, 1903 


•lune 


10, 1904 


Feb. 


18, 1901 


Dec. 


20, 1902 


May 


23, 1910 


Nov. 


30. 1912 


May 


4, 1903 


Sept. 


10, 1903 


May 


18, 1903 


July 


27, 1907 


Aug. 


14, 1902 


June 


26, 1905 


June 


3, 1901 


Sept. 


30, 1904 cook 


May 


4, 1903 


June 


10. 1904 


Oct. 


17, 1910 


Aug. 


22, 1911 


June 


19, 1905 


Oct. 


20, 1910 cpl. 


Oct. 


14, 1907 


Sept. 


30, 1909 


Sept. 


28, 1903 


June 


26,1905 


Sept. 


28, 1903 


Feb. 


10. 1904 


May 


8, 1902 


May 


8, 1903 


May 


10, 1904 


July 


10, 1909 


Apr. 


17, 1902 


May 


20, 1910 epl., sgt., 1st sgt. 


Served in World 


War as Capt., 1st Div. oversea 


July 


12, 1909 


May 


10, 1910 


May 


10, 1904 


June 


10, 1908 


Feb. 


12, 1906 


Apr. 


10, 1907 


Aug. 


21, 1906 


Aug. 


21, 1907 


May 


8, 1902 


June 


10, 1908 cpl. 


May 


18, 1904 


Oct. 


29, 1904 


May 


10, 1904 


June 


9, 1906 


Dec. 


12, 1904 


Apr. 


10, 1907 



e May 30, 1888; continuous service to Dec. 1, 1913; 
Spanish-American War Co. A, 6th Mass. U. S. Vol. 
Porto Rican campaign; mus. out Jan. 21, 1899; 
Bugler, Qm. Sgt., Capt. Ordnance Dept. July 1,. 
1915; Asst. Inspector Small Arms Practice; Capt. N. 
G. Re.-erve Apr. 24, 1917; Major Retired List Jan. 
17, 1919; World War, Capt Small Arms Firing School; 
trans, to 20th Div., Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C, 
Oct. 10, 1918; trans, to Infantry School of Arms, 
Columbus, Ga., Nov. 5, 1918; National Matches, Cald- 
well, N. J. as instructor July 23, 1919; returned to 
Infantry School Sept. 20, 1919; trans, to 3rd U. S. 
Inf., Eagle Pass, Texas, Feb. 19, 1920, as Capt. Co. I 
and Construction Quartermaster; detailed to Camp 
Perry as Asst. Quartermaster June 5, 1920; ordered 
to Boston and discharged Oct. 15, 1920; services nO' 
longer required. 



298 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Name 

King, Charles W. 
Krom, William M. 
LaBueque, Alfred N. 
LaForme. Elmer J. 
Lane, Frank H. 
Legg-. Clarence A. 
LeGoff, William A. 
LeFave, Stanley J. 
Litchfield. Benjamin E. 
Little Frank P. 
Locke, Charles H. 
Lockhart, Walter C. 
Logan, Joseph D. 
Low, Louis F. 
Lyons, John 
MacDonald, Leon F. 
Maclntire, Gordon G. 
Maloney, Michael J. 
Marshall, Wiley W. 
Marhiot, Elmer B. 
Maher, Edwin C, Jr. 
Martin, David 
Martin, James M. 
Mayer, Walter G. 
Mayer, William A. 
McCarthy, Joseph J. 
McDonald, Thomas A. 
McFadden, Andrew J. 
McFadden. James F. 
McGlory, Edwin F. 
McGlory, John J. 
McGrath, Thomas H. 
McKinnan. Ronald H. 
McLean, Asbury 
McManus, George W. 
McManus, Terrance P. 
McMahon, John H. 



McMaster. Lauren L. 
McNeil, Hugh J. 
McWade, Harry B. 
Menadue, Sydney J. 
Merrill, Rufus A. 
Miller, Ernest E. 
Milligan. Arthur W. 
Moody, Chester W. 
Morrison. Alfred A. 
Morse, Albert W. 
Mortimer, Clifford R. 

Mortimer, Paul W. 
Murphy, William R. 
Murphy, Daniel A. 
Muse, Edward J. 
Nichols, Amos C. 
Nichols, Louis I. 
Niles, John W. 
O'Brien, Edward P. 
Oliver, Arthur G. 



Oliver, Frank C. 
O'Malley, Thomas P. 



Enlisted 

Mar. 20, 1908 
June 3,1901 
Feb. 1, 1915 
Dec. 12. 1904 
Dec. 12, 1904 
Oct. 26, 1903 
30, 1910 

2, 1913 
14, 1916 

18, 1904 

19, 1905 
5, 1903 

20, 1911 
10, 1904 
12, 1901 

26, 1913 

27, 1912 
10, 1904 

5, 1909 
29, 1911 
14, 1907 
12, 1909 
12, 1906 

7, 1904 
20, 1907 
18, 1903 

4, 1903 
18, 1903 
6, 1917 

3, 1907 
23, 1906 
16, 1914 

2, 1913 
23, 1907 
12, 1901 

1, 1915 



Dec. 
June 
Mar. 
Feb. 
June 
Jan. 
Mar. 
May 
Jan. 
May 
May 
May 
Apr. 
May 
Oct. 
July 
Feb. 
Mar. 
May 
May 
Mar. 
May 
June 
June 
Mav 
Mar. 
June 
May 
Jan. 
Feb 



Discharged 

June 

Mar. 

June 

.Tune 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

July 

Feb. 

June 

May 

Mar. 

Mav 

Oct. 

Dec. 

May 

Nov. 

July 

Oct. 

Jan. 

July 

May 

Oct, 

Oct. 

Dec. 

June 

May 



Rank 

10, 1908 
10, 1902 
30, 1915 
26, 1905 
30. 1907 
10, 1905 
30, 1913 
20, 1915 

1, 1916 
18, 1907 

9, 1906 
29,1903 
20, 1914 
10, 1907 
20, 1903 
10, 1915 
20, 1914 
30, 1907 
20, 1910 
30, 1912 
29, 1910 
12, 1912 

29, 1908 
10, 1904 

9, 1912 

30, 1904 

10, 1904 cpl., sgt. 
18. 1907 



(no discharge date given) 



Oct. 30, 1908 

Mav 23, 1909 

Sept. 10, 1914 

Feb. 20, 1915 

Feb. 10, 1908 

June 10,1904 

July 1, 1916 
June 5, 1893; continuous service to June 14, 1915; 
Co. A, 6th Mass. U. S. Vol., Spanish-American War, 
1898, in action at Quanica; Cpl., Sgt., 2nd Lt. June 
12, 1899; Capt. Feb. 24, 1902; Major Aug. 15, 1914; 
Lt.-Col. retired June 14, 1915; Capt. Co. H, 12th Regt., 
State Guard, .Tune 20, 1917; Major State Guard July, 
1917 ; Major U. S. Qm. Reserve Dec. 27, 1923. Military 
instructor in High Schools of Wakefield, Stoneham 
and Woburn. 



Oct. 27, 1902 




Dec. 


30, 1904 


Jan. 27. 1913 




Mar. 


20, 1914 (without honor) 


May 12, 1908 




July 


10, 1909 


Dec. 29, 1902 




Dec. 


29, 1903 cpl. 


Dec. 12, 1904 




Dec. 


12, 1905 


June 4, 1917 




Aug. 


5, 1917 


May 10, 1909 




May 


10, 1912 


Aug. 24,1903 




Feb. 


10, 1904 


Mar. 11, 1910 




Mar. 


20, 1911 


May 27, 1912 




Dec. 


10, 1913 


e May 8, 1897; 


Corp. 1899 


; Spanish War; sergt. Feb. 


1901; d May 8, 


1903. 




Feb. 9, 1905 




Feb. 


9, 1911 cpl., sgt. 


June 18, 1901 




June 


18. 1903 


June 27, 1907 




Jan. 


10, 1908 


May 23, 1906 




May 


23, 1916 


June 19, 1905 




Aug. 


10, 1909 cook 


Feb. 9, 1903 




June 


10, 1908 cpl. 


Mar. 9, 1908 




Dec. 


10, 1909 


June 19, 1905 




Aug. 


10, 1905 


Apr. 24, 1902 




Oct. 


20, 1902 


Sergt. in Regula 


r Army, World War, overseas. 


Still in U. S. 


Service. 




Oct. 3. 1910 




Oct. 


3, 1913 


July 12,1909 




Jan. 


29, 1910 



299 



History Of Richardson Light Guari> 



Name 

O'Melia, Thomas 
O'Neill, John C. 
O'Neill. Joseph H. 
Orde, Oakley A. 
O'Rourke, Herbert J. 
Oxley, Charles A. 
Page, George C. 
Parker, Charles J. 
Parker, Robert H. 
Paon, Wilfred E. 
Patch, Chester C. 
Peterson, Christie 
Phelan, William J. 
Prescott, George L. 
Qualters, Joseph J. 
Reid, George W. 

Reynolds, James F. 
Reynolds, Philip F. 



Rogers, Chester L. 

Roach, George A. 
Roberts, Richard H. 
Robinson, Alton T. 
Ronan, J. Fred 

Ripley, Harry P. 
Ruggles, Francis D. 
Russell, Carl H. 
Russell, Charles B. 
Russell, Harry F. 
Santos, Theodore 
Skterlay, Edward L. 
Schaedel, Charles S. 
Seabury, Edward M. 
Sedgley, Alton R. 



Sexton, Edward J. 



Shanahan, Daniel W. 
Shanahan, John D. 
Shea, Daniel W. 
Singer, Irving C. 
Skillings, Walter J. 
Sliney, Edmund C. 

Sliney, John D. 
Smith, William H. 
Smith, Percy M. 
Smith, Edward E. 
Spear, Howard "W. 
Sproul, Walter R. 
Stanley, William J. 
Stark, Edwin J. 
Stevens, Thomas W. 
Stevenson. Eben J. 
Stewart, Harry W. 
Stimpson, Parker 
Stock, George 
Stone, Henry L. 
Stone. Ward E. 
Stuart, Harry W. 
-Sullivan, Arthur J. 
Sullivan, Charles J. 
Sullivan, Daniel 



Enlisted Discharged Kank 

Mar. 14, 1910 Oct. 20, 1910 

June 18. 1911 June 18, 1914 

Oct. 17. 1910 Oct. 17, 1914 cpl. 

May 4, 1910 Feb. 25, 1911 

June 20, 1910 June 20. 1913 

Mar. 16, 1903 Dec. 10, 1903 

Oct. 26, 1903 June 9, 1908 

Mar. 11, 1907 Nov. 30, 1907 

July 12, 1909 Dec. 10. 1909 

Jan. 17, 1910 .Tan. 17, 1913 

June 1, 1905 June 1, 1908 

Apr. 4, 1902 May 5, 1903 

July 12, 1909 July 12, 1912 

Nov. 20, 1909 Feb. 21, 1910 

May 4. 1908 May 4, 1912 cpl. 

p ,Tan. 21, 1895; Spanish War; con. ser. ; d Oct. 31, 



1911. 

Mar. 3, 1902 

June 13, 1903 



Dec. 20. 1902 

Nov. 30. 1907 
Served in Regular Army, Spanish War; served 
British Ai-my Overseas in World War. 



e May 21. 1906 
]Mar. 30. 1909. 
July 10. 1909 
Apr. 18, 1901 
Dec. 30. 1915 
e May 18, 189 
con. ser. to d 
Nov. 15, 1907 
Sept. 22, 1908 
19, 1905 
4, 1908 
12. 1904 
12. 1908 
23. 1907 
29, 1902 
27, 1913 
4, 1895 



.Tune 
May 
Oct. 
May 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Mar. 



d Feb. 28, 1907; re Jan. 4, 1909; d 

July 10, 1913 

Apr. 18, 1902 

June 20. 1916 
16: Spanish War: corp., sergt., 1899; 
Dec. 10, 1903, 1st sergt. 

June 4, 1908 

June 10, 1908 

Nov. 30, 1908 

May 4, 1911 

Aug. 10. 1905 

May 12. 1913 

Oct. 29. 1910 

Sept. 10, 1903 

Sept. 10, 1914 
continuous service; d Jan. 21, 



Spanish-American War; re Nov. 6, 1901; continuous 

service to June, 1907; Cpl., Sgt., 2nd Lt. Feb. 24, 1902. 

res. d June 1907. 

Mar. 11, 1915 

Served in World 

Seriously wounded. 

July 3, 1902 

11, 1911 

15. 1911 

15, 1911 

11, 1907 

18, 1901 



Tune 
War : 

July 
Aug. 
July 
June 
Jan. 
July 



20. 1916 

II 26th Division Overseas. 

3, 1903 

9. 1912 
26, 1913 
23. 1915 
10, 1908 
20, 1901 



Sept. 
May 
May 
Mar. 
.Tune 
Served Overseas as Chaplain in World War. 

Oct. 30, 1909 ^' ~ 

June 24, 1907 

Nov. 11, 1901 

Apr. 11. 1916 

Oct. 31. 1908 
June 3. 1901 

Oct. 17. 1910 
Aug. 4, 1902 

Oct. 31, 1908 

May 10, 1904 
Oct. 1. 1904 

June 23, 1913 

Sept. 28. 1903 

Nov. 17, 1902 

July 12, 1909 
Oct. 1, 1907 

May IS, 1903 

Feb. 18, 1901 

Oct. 31, 1906 



Feb. 10. 1910 

Feb. 10. 1908 

May 20, 1902 

June 20, 1916 

July 15. 1910 

Dec. 20, 1902 

Oct. 20, 1910 

Nov. 10, 1915 cpl., sgt., 1st sgt. 

Oct. 31, 1913 

Feb. 10, 1909 

Oct. 1, 1907 cpl. 

Dec. 10. 1913 

Feb. 10. 1904 

June 10. 1904 

Oct. 30, 1914 

Nov. 30, 1908 

May IS, 1913 

Dec. 20. 1902 

Oct. 31, 1909 



300 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Name 

b'uilivaii. Frank R. 
Sullivan. Timothy J. 
Sweeney. Eu.uene 
Sweetser, Walter I. 



Tompson, William R. 
Twombly, Albert L. 
Upton, Joshua D. 
Vose, Charles A. 
Walker, Everett E. 
"Walsli, Maurice F. 
Walsh, Tliomas W. 
"Watts, .lohn W. 
W^ebber, Charles 
WHiall, Thomas J, 
AVheeler, Penwick E. 
Wheeler, Frank McC. 
Wheeler, William J. 
Whitney, Albert E. 
Whitney, James T. 
Whitney, Joseph F. 
Whitney, William D. 
W'hittle, John A. 
Wigg-in, Samuel F. 
AViley, Fred B. 
Williams, Frank L. 
AVilson, Frank 
Wittekind, Arthur 
Wood, Frank J. 
Woodward, Roy M. 
Wrenn, P. Francis 



Enlisted 

Feb. 1, 1915 
June 24, 1907 
:May 21, 1908 
e June 0, 1S92; 
d Mar. 28, 1914. 
W^orld War. 



Dicharged Kank 

July 1, 191() 

Jan. 10, 1908 

May 21, 1911 
con. ser. ; Spanish War; cpl, sgt; 
Served in Regular Army, Overseas, 



Apr. 


24, 1902 


Apr. 


24, 1905 


Oct. 


17, 1910 


Aug. 


10, 1911 


June 


30, 1903 


July 


28, 1900 


Oct. 


6, 1902 


May 


29, 1903 


.Tan. 


5, 1903 


Dec. 


30, 1904 


June 


20, 1910 


Jan. 


20, 1912 


June 


20, 1910 


Ang. 


4, 1915 


June 


8, 1906 


Feb. 


28, 1907 


June 


25. 1912 


July 


19, 1913 


Feb. 


26, 1903 


June 


9, 1906 


Mar. 


11, 1907 


Mar. 


30, 1909 


June 


18, 1911 


Aug. 


9, 1912 


May 


10, 1904 


Sept. 


30, 1907 


Dec. 


28, 1903 


Sept. 


30, 1904 


June 


19, 1905 


Jan. 


20, 1906 


Dec. 


29, 1913 


Sept. 


10, 1914 


June 


2, 1913 


Feb. 


19, 1916 


May 


8, 1902 


May 


8, 1903 


May 


IS, 1903 


Dec. 


10, 1908 


Dec. 


23, 1912 


Mar. 


20, 1914 


Oct. 


21, 1907 


Apr. 


10, 1908 


Oct. 


6, 1902 


Feb. 


10, 1903 


Feb. 


12, 1906 


Aug. 


30, 1907 


Jan. 


17, 1910 


•Jan. 


17, 1913 


Oct. 


26, 1903 


Oct. 


10, 1904 


Oct. 


3, 1910 


June 


30, 1913 




OMISSION 





The name of Cpl. Philip J. McCook was unintentionally omitted from 
the 50th anniversary volume roster of Co. A, 6th Rgt. Cpl. McCook 
served in the Spanish War. During the World War he served in the 
Judge Advocate's Dept., as Major. He was severely wounded during 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Major McCook is now (1926) a judge in 
the New York Supreme Court. 



301 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 
Company A During World War 

In order to save repetition all names followecl bv "26th" were members of 
tlie 26tli Division which left for overseas from Sept. 7, 1917, to Oct. 8, 1917, 
and landed in France Sept. 21, to Oct. 28, 1917. Returned to U. S. April, 1919. 

Sectors and Battles of the 26th Div. — Chemin des Dames, Toul (Boucq and 
La Reine), Pas Fini, Chateau Thierry Offensive (second battle of the Marne), 
St. JMihiel Offensive, Rupt and Troyon, Neptune and Meuse — Argonne Offensive. 
Abbreviations — com., Commissioned 

con. ser., continuous service 

d, discharged 

e, enlisted 

re, re-enlisted 
trans, transferred 

wd, wounded; men gassed were casualties and were awarded 
Wound Stripes. 
Bannan, John T.— e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4. 1917; d Apr. 28, 1919. 

2,ith. 
Barrv, Augustine C— e Nov. 23, 1915; trans. 102nd Inf.. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 23th. 
Baxter, Augustus D. — e Aug. 4, 1902: eon. ser.; cpl., sgt., 1st sgt. ; trans. 4th 

Pioneers overseas Sept. 23; trans. 40th Div. October; returned U. S. April, 

1919; d April, 1919. 
Beane, Raymond E.— e Dec. 30, 191.5; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d Apr. 28, 

1919. 26th. 
Beebe, John H., Jr.— e Oct. 27, 1915; trans. 101st Bng. Aug. 30, 1917; trans, to 

101st Inf., 1018; gassed October, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Beeler, Cornelius H.— e Feb. 19, 1915; trans. 104th Inf., Aug. 28, 1917; d. Apr. 

29, 1919. 26th. 
Behrle, .Joseph F.— e Nov. 6, 1916; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; gassed July, 

1918; cpl; d. June 16, 1919. 26th. 
Better, Edward F., Jr.— e Nov. 23, 1915; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; severely 

wounded June, 1918; cpl., sgt., 1st sgt.; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Bishop, Harry— e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; d Apr. 29, 1919. 

2'Hth. 
Blanchard, Leon A.— e Mar. 29, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police, Aug. 21, 1917; 

trans. Co. E, 104th Inf. May, 1918; severely wounded May, 1918; d Mar. 6, 

1919. 2Sth. 
Brockbauk, Gray B.— e Nov. 23, 1915; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July 23, 1918; cpl., graduated Army Candidates School, France; com. 2nd Lt. 

Reserve Corps March, 1919; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Brockbank, John C— e May 27, 1912; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918: wounded September, 1918; killed in action Bois d' Haumont Oct. 

17, 1918; cpl. 26th. 
Brown, James G.— e Dec. 14, 1914; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; com. 2nd Lt. 

and assigned Co. A, 126th Inf., 32nd Div.; severely wounded October, 1918; 

cpl., sgt., 1st sgt., 2nd It.: d Jan. 18, 1919. 26th. 
Buckley, Joseph J. — e May 10, 1904; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. overseas Sept. 23; 

cook ; died of disease on boat October, 1918. 
Burns, John T.— e May 23, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; died of disease, 

France, Sept. 27, 1918. 26th. 
Burns, Matthew J. — e .Tune 15, 1910; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. overseas Sept. 23, 

1918; trans. 83rd Div.; cpl., sgt.; d July 15, 1919. 
Burns, William F. — e Mar. 16, 1914; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. overseas Sept. 23, 

1918; d July, 1919. 
Burrage, George A. -e Dec. 29, 1913; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; cpl., sgt.; 

d physical Nov. 15, 1917. 26th. 
Buthjr, John M.— e Feb. 19, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; cited in Div. or- 
ders; wounded July, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Byrnes, Fred H.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July, 1919. 26th. 
Cayting, Aubrey B. — e Dec. 29, 1913; d dependents, Apr. 30, 1917. 
Cayting, Hayward C. — e June 4, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918; d Ajiril, 1919. 26th. 
Champagne, Frank L. — e Apr. 5, 1909; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

cpl.; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Cheever, Carl I.— e October 30, 1909 ; trans. 101st Tr. Hq. & Military Police Aug. 

21, 1917; mus., cpl.; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Collins, James— e May 25, 1917; trans. 104tli Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded July, 

1918; wounded October, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 

302 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Connelly, Edward J.— e May 12, 189S, Co. A, 6th Mass. U. S. Vol. ; Spanish-Amer- 
ican War; in action at Quanica, Porto Rico, July 2(!, 1898; mus. out Jan. 
21, 1899; re Feb. 20, 1899; con. ser. to May 20, 1919; military instructor 
Stoneham High School four years; cpl.. sgt.. 1st sgt. ; 2nd It. June 10, 19il7; 
1st It. Nov. 22, 1909; capt. Sept. 21, 1914; U. S. service Apr. 6, 1917; trans. 
Capt. Co. G, 104th Inf. Sept. 30, 1917; overseas Oct. 3, 1917 to Apr. 4, 1919; 
1st Corps School (Tactical) June 8 to July 8, 1918; assigned instructor 92nd 
Div. to Aug. 28. 1918; Adjutant 104th Inf. to Sept. 30, 1918; com. Major, 
104tli Inf. date of Sept. 13. 1918 and assigned 1st Bn. Battles and Sectors— 
Chemin des Dam.-s, Boucq. Toul, Bois Brule, (Apremont), St. Die (92nd 
Div.), St. Mihiel Offensive, Rupt, Troyon, Neptune, Meuse-Argonne Offen- 
sive. Severely wounded in action Nov. 10, 1918, at Ville Devant Chaumont ; 
Base Hospital No. 114 Bordeaux to Dec. 20; returned to 104th Inf., assigned 
to 1st Bn.; d May 20, 1919. Twice reconmiended for Distinguished Service 
Cross for gallantry in action ; awarded Croix de Guerre and citation of 
French 32nd Army Corps for gallantry at Apremont ; twice cited Div. or- 
ders ; cited in G. H. Q. Citation Orders No. 1 ; U. S. Army Citation signed by 
Gen. Pershing- ; awarded Silver Star citation U. S. Array for gallantry in 
action Nov. 10. 1918; awarded Croix de Guerre citation diploma from French 
government, Dec. 22, 1925; awarded U. S. Accolade for wounded soldiers. 
26th. 

Coombs, Carl L.— e June 4, 1917; trans. 104th Inf Aug. 28, 1917; killed in 
action Oct. 16, 1918. 26th. 

Comey, Francis W.— e June 26, 1916; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; trans, 
to" 26th Div. Supply Train; cpl.; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 

Corcoran, Thomas F. — e Dee. 14, 1914; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt February, 1918; 
trans. Prisoner of War Co. overseas Sept. 23, 1918; cpl., sgt.; d July, 1919. 

Creedon, Charles E. — e June 14, 1915; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt February, 1918; 
trans. 1st Anti-Aircraft M. G. Bn overseas May, 1918; Co. clerk, cpl., sgt., 
Bn. s.g-t., major.; d May 23, 1919. 

Creedon, Jeremiah E. — e May 18, 1906; trans. Plattsburg School for Officers; 
com. 2nd It. Aug. 15, 1917; trans. 151st Depot Brigade; com. 1st It. Aug. 14, 
1918; cpl., sgt., 2nd It., 1st It.; d Feb. IS, 1919. 

Crocker, Donald G.— e Apr. 18, 1917; ;trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; severely 
wounded July, 1918. 26th. 

Crowlev, John J.— e June 26. 1916; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; wounded May. 
1918; cpl.; d Apr. 28, 1919. 26th. 

Cumniing. Timothy E.— e June 14, 1915; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; killed 
in action Sept. 13, 1918. 26th. 

Davis, Harold F.— e May 27, 1912; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. 2nd It Aug. 8, 1918; 
overseas Sept. 23, 1918; trans. 331st Inf.; 2nd It 305th Inf., 77th Div. Nov. 
1, 1918; trans. 2nd It 23rd Inf., 2nd Div. Nov. 14, 1918; cpl., sgt., 2nd It; 
d July 15, 1919. 

Derbv, John W.— e Oct. 20, 1913; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d. Apr. 29, 1919. 
26th. 

DeRoche, George B.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; gassed 
Apr. 20, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 

Devlin, Charles ^Nl.— e June 2, 1917; trans. 101st Military "Police Aug. 21, 1917; 
d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 

Devoe. William— e May 23, 1917 ; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917 ; d Apr. 29, 1919. 
26th. 

Dillaway, George L.— e Apr. 11, 1917; d May to enter West Point; 2nd It. 
November, 1918; 1st It January, 1920; cpl., 2nd It., 1st It.; d Nov. 1, 1920. 

Dillaway, Mansou M. — e June 26, 1916; trans, to Aviation Section; cpl.. 2nd It. 

Dingle, Arthur L.— e Aug. 16, 1916; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 28, 1919. 
26th. 

Donegan, John P.— e June 4, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; killed in 
action Oct. 16, 1918. 26th. 

Doucette, Charles M. — e Feb. 4, 1915 ; d dependents Apr. 23, 1917. 

Doucette. Jeremiah W. — e Mar. 29, 1917; trans. 101st Eng. Aug. 30, 1917; d Apr. 
29. 1919. 26th. 

Doucette, John A.— « Mar. 26, 1914; d physical October. 1917. 

Doucette, John M.— * June 5, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 
d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 

Dubois, Victor A.— e May 23, 1917; trans. KJlst Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; awarded Dis- 
tinguished Service Cross and citation and Croix de Guerre; wounded Oct. 
23, 1918; cpl.; d Apr. 29. 1919. 26th. 

Duggan. John P.— e Mav 23, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded July 
1918; killed in action Oct. 16, 1918; cpl. 26th. 

Dulong, Frank R.— e June 5. 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 
d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 

303 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Eastman. Ernest E.— e June 2. 1913: trans 104th Inf. Aug. 28. 1917: severely 

wounded .July, 1918: cpl.. sgt., 1st sgt. : d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Eaton, Natlian W., Jr.— e Apr. (3, 1917: trans. Co. G, lO-lth Inf Aug. 28, 1917; 

awarded Troix de Guerre and citation: wounded October, 1918; cpl., sgt.; 

d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Edgar, Brent M.-- e Apr. 9, 1914; trans. Co. K, 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; cpl.; 

d Jan. 2, 1919. 26th. 
Edwards, Favette R.— e June 4. 1917; trans. 104th Inf., Aug. 28, 1917; d Apr. 

29, 1919. 26th. 
Evans, Frederick G.— e Oct. 31, 1908; con. ser. to Apr. 23, 1917; d to worli for 

government ; cpl., sgt. 
Fairbanks, Ernest E.— e Mar. 29, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 

1917: d July 12. 1919. 26th. 
Fall, William B.— e Mar. 23, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 28, 1919. 

26th. 
Fav, Edward M.— e May 20, 1915; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; wounded 

April, 1918: killed in action ,Tuly, 1918. 26th. 
Ferrick, Joseph M.— e Mar. 29, 1917; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1918; d Apr. 20, 

1919. 26th. 
Ferrick, James F.— e May 29, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28,1917: d Apr. 29, 1919. 

26th. 
Findlay, James W. — e May 8, 1902; con. ser. to June 23, 1917; d for dependents; 

mus. cpl. 
Findlay, John, Jr. — e May 8, 1902; con. ser. to July, 1919: trans. 4th Pioneers 

February. 1918; overseas Sept. 23, 1918; trans, to S3rd Div. ; trans. Army of 

Occupation. Germany: cpl., sgt., mess sgt., 1st sgt.. Bn. sgt., maj.; Regt. 

sgt. maj.: d July, 19i9. 
Fish, Crowell G.— e Apr. 9, 1914; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; died from 

wounds July, 1918; cpl. 26th. 
Flanders, Frank R.— Trans from Co. M, 6th Mass. Inf.: trans, to 104th Inf.; 

1st It. 26th. 
Forrest. William M.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans, to 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917: d 

Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Foster, Harold H.— e Sept. 30, 1904; con. ser. to Sept. 30, 1915; re Feb. 16, 1916; 

cpl., cook: d dependents May 16, 1917. 
Fraughton, George P.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. wounded July, 1918; 

d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Galvin, Daniel H.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

trans back to Co. A, 6th Mass.; trans 4th Pioneers' Regt. February 1918; 

overseas Sept. 23, 1918; trans. 330th Inf. 83rd Div.; bugler, sgt.; d Feb. 14, 

1919. 
Gammons, Frank W.— e May 25, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 28, 1917; 

wounded July, 1918; d July, 1919. 26th. 
Gerard, Stanley R.— e June 5, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 26th. 
Gersinovitch, Saul C— e May 11, 1916; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. Feb. 23, 1918; 

overseas Sept. 23, 1918: trans, to 83rd Div.; d July, 1919. 
Gibbons, John C— e June 4, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 28, 1917; 

d July, 1919. 28th. 
Glynn, Charles M.— e Mar. 29, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; trans, to 

' Pershing's Band: bugler; d April, 1919. 26th. 
Goodridge, Carl W.— e July 8, 1915: trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917: severely 

wounded Sept. 30, 1918; trans. 101st Field Signal Bn ; cpl., sgt.; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 26th. 
Goodwin, Albert C— e May 28, 1915; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July 3, 1919. 26th. 
Greenleaf, Harold H.— e May 29, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

wagoner: d July 3, 1919. 26th. 
Griffiths, Howard W.— e Oct. 21, 1912; d Oct. 21, 1915: re Nov. 6, 1916; d Apr. 23, 

1917; dependents. 
Hale, Albert F.— e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 29, 1919. 

26th. 
Hanright, Thomas E.— e May 23, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Harlow, Melvin H.— e Sept. 27, 1916: trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

trans. 101st Eng. : cook; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Harper, Robert E.— e June 26, 1916; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d Apr. 2!), 1919. 26th. 
Hatfield, George E.— e Mav 23, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918: cpl.; d Feb. 20, 1919. 26th. 

304 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

Hawkes Edgar B.— e :Mav S. 1<.)()2 : con. scr. to August, I'.JKI : 2nd Lt. Sept. 
14 1014- assigned Kith V. S. Inf. Maivli. 1917 to June, 1917, at Mexican 
Border -'trans, to 101st Tv. Uq. and Military Police Aug. 2.3. 1917; trans, to 
103rd M. G. Co., 1st Lt. ; trans, to 103rd Inf.; trans. IStli :M. G. Battalion 
Army of Occupation, Germany, cpl., sgt., 1st sgt. ; Regt. sgt. maj., 2nd It., 
1st It.; d, Aug. 15, 1919. 26th. 

Heningar, John N.— e Aug. 3, 1916; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d June 3, 

Heustis,' G"eorge B.— e July 8, 1915; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; epl., sgt.; 

wounded July, 1918; d July, 1919. 26th. 
Hickey, Edward E.— e Mav 12, 1908; con. ser. to Sept. 27, 1919; cpl., sgt., com- 

pa'nv clerk; com. 2nd Lt. Aug. 15, 1917; assigned Hq. Co., 303rd Inf.; com. 

1st Lt. Dec. 31, 1917 and assigned Co. L, 303rd Inf.; overseas July 8, 1918, 

76th Div. ; assigned Div. Kange Officer; trans. 163rd Inf., 41st Div., Nov. 12, 

1918; trans, to R. R. and Claims Bureau, St. Aignon Area, Nov. 18, 1918; 

Town .Major to Sept. 3. 1919; returned to U. S. ; d Sept. 27, 1919. 
Hobliv. Harry R.— e June 2, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police; d Apr. 29, 1919. 

2(ith. 
Holden. Herbert W.— e Nov. 23, 1915; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. February 1918; 

overseas Sept. 23, 1918; trans. 40th Div., 330th Inf. Oct., 1918; cpl., sgt.; 

d Apr. 17. 1919. 
Holowav, Percie TJ.— e Nov. 23, 1915; trans. 101st Supply Train; d Apr. 29, 1919. 

28th. 
Holt, Arthur R.— e May 23, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July 3, 1919. 26th. 
Hubbard, Alfred H.— e May 12, 1914; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. February. 1918; 

overseas Sept. 23, lOlS : trans. 83rd Div. October, 1918; trans, 215th Prisoner 

of War Co. ; cook, sgl ; d Sept. 21. 1919. 
Hurton, James F. — e .June 7, 1917; d physical October, 1918. 
Hutchinson, Carl R.— e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 26th. 
Jeffery, Charles J.— e May 20, 1915; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d April 29, 

1919. 26th. 
Lane, Thomas J,— e May 23, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d Apr. 29, 1919. 

28th. 
Latham. Edward C— e July 28, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d Apr. 28, 

1919. 26th. 
Lawlor, Frank E.—e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July 3, 1919. 26th. 
Lee, John J. — e July 8, 1915; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3. 1917; awarded Croix de 

Guerre with Palm and citation and Div. citation ; severely gassed October, 

1918; cpl., sgt.; d Feb. 28, 1919. 26th. 
liCnners, Eugene J.— e June 4, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d Apr. 28, 

1919. 26th. 
Little, Cyrus R.— e June 28, 1915; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; cpl., sgt.; 

d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Loughlin. Patrick E.— e June 20, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 

1917; d July, 1919. 26th. 
Lucev, Joseph A.— e May 26, 1917; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 26th. 
I^uken, Lawrence A.— e Fub. 16, 1916; trans, 101st Am. Tr. ; d April, 1919. 26th. 
Luken, Roy B.— e Nov. 23. 1915; trans. 102nd Inf.; d Apr. 28. 1919. 26th. 
Malonson, Frank J.— e May 23, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July. 1918 : d Apr.. 29, 1919, 26th. 
Marchetti. Frank F. — e Feb. 17, 1917; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. February, 1918; 

overseas Sept. 23. bug., cpl., sgt.; d Apr. 19, 1919. 
McCarthy, Frank E. — e June 26, 1916; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; gassed 

October, 1918; d Apr. 28, 1919. 26th. 
McCuUough, John W.— e June 25. 1915; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; gassed 

Oct,, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
McGrath, John F,— e May 23, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

Oct, 16, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. o 

McKenna, Robert B.— e June 7, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July, 1919. 26th. 
McKenney, Frank L.—e May 29, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug 21, 1917; 

d July, 1919. 26th. 
McLaughlin, Andrew P.— e June 14, 1915; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; died 

from wounds Oct. 30, 1918; cpl. 26th. 
McMahon, John E.— e Mav 27, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 26th. 

305 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

McMaster, Henry — e Mav 8, 1917: trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. February, 1918; over- 
seas Sept. 23, 1918 ; trans. 83rcl Div. October, 1918 ; d May, 1919. 
MeNally, .Tames P.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; cl Apr. 28, 

1919. 26th. 
McWhinnie, Ernest J.— e May 23, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 

1917; gassed October, 1918; d May 8, 1919. 26th. 
McWhinnie, Percy C— e May 23, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21,. 

1917; d May 8, 1919. 26th. 
Melanson, Edward J.— e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d Apr. 28, 

1919. 26th. 
Mellen, Ernest E.— e June 4, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; d June 21,. 

1919. 26th. 
Melonson, Fred P.— e June 10, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; gassed July, 

.1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Meuse, Thomas E.— e Aug. 21, 1916; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; killed in. 

action July, 1918. 26th. 
Mortimer, Harold E.— e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917;. 

d July, 1919. 26th. 
Murray, John T.— e Jan. 4, 1909; con. ser. ; cpl., sgt. ; d Apr. 23. 1917 to work 

for government. 
Neiss, Archie J.— e May 23, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; gassed July,. 

1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Nelson, Harry E.— e May, 23. 1917; trans, to 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917: awarded 

Croix de Guerre (posthumous) ; cpl. ; died from wounds Apr. 13, 1918. 26th. 
Nutile, Charles C.—e Aug. 3, 1916; trans. 102nd Inf.: detained in U. S. 
Oldfleld, John W.— e May 29, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d April 28,. 

1919. 26th. 
O'Neill, James D.— e Mav 25, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; d April 29, 

1919. 26th. 
Palumbo, John— e June 4, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; gassed October,. 

1918; cpl.; d Apr. 29. 1919. 26th. 
Perkins, George S.-- e Mar. 26, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1918; d Apr. 28,. 

1919. 26th. 
Philbrick, William A. e— May 3, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1918; d Apr. 28.. 

1919. 26th. 
Preston, James A. — e ,Iune 6, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July, 1919. 26th. 
Quinn, Thomas J.— e Apr. 10, 1914; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. February, 1918; 

grad)iated 4th Oflicers Training School; cpl., sgt., com. 2nd Lt. Inf.; d Feb.. 

20, 1919. 
Reebenacker, Edward K.— e Mar. 31, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; 

wounded July, 1918; d August, 1919. 26th. 
Keissle, Frederick K.— e June 2, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918: d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Rhodes, William H.— e May 20, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; severely 

wounded July, 1918; d 1918. 26th. 
Robertson, Herbert L.— e June 8, 1917; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d July 2, 1919. 26th. 
Rogers, Fred H.— e Aug. 19,1901; con. ser. to Aug. 15, 1919; cpl., sgt.; 2nd Lt. 

Nov. 22, 1909; 1st Lt. Sept. 21, 1914; U. S. service Mexican Border, July 

to September, 1916; trans, to Co. M, 6th Mass. Inf. August, 1917; assigned 

Camp Quartermaster at Westfield. August, 1917 : trans. 101st Ammunition 

Tr. overseas Oct. 3, 1917; com. Capt. June 3, 1918; Major Oct. 7, 1918; 

trans. 117th Am. Tr. 42nd Div. November, 1918: Army of Occupation, Ger- 
many: trans. 3rd Am. Tr. 3rd Div.; d Aug. 15, 1919. 26th. 
aargent, George D.— e Nov. 23, 1915; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; d Apr. 28,. 

1919. 26th. 
Seabury, Frank J.— e June 5, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; d Apr. 29, 

1919. 26th. 
Seabury, James S.— e .Tune 5, 1917: trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918; d Apr. 29, 1919. 26th. 
Seabury, William D.— e Mar. 16, 1914; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded 

July, 1918; d January, 1919. 26th. 
Seaman, Frank T.— e June 5, 1917; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1917; d Apr. 29,. 

1919. 26th. 
Singer, Norman C. — e June 5, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; wounded: 

July, 1918; severely wounded Sept. 15, 1918. 26th. 
Singer, Robert L.— e May 27, 1915; d physical Sept. 1, 1917. 
Stanley, Calvin R.— e Mar. 29, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; gassed 

July, 1918; severely wounded Nov. 10, 1918; d Jan. 24, 1919. 26th. 

306 



History Of Richards. on Light Guard 

Stone George W.— e June 1, 1905; con. ser. ; d Feb. 10, 1009 ;re May 4, 1914; 

trans. 330th Inf. S3rd Div. ; trans. 204th Prisoner of War Escort Co. ; con. 

ser. ; cpl., sgt., 1st sgt. ; d June 23, 1919. 
Stone, Otis L.— e May 24, 1913 ; con. ser. ; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1017 ; award- 
ed D. S. C. with citation, and Croix de Guerre with citation, for gallantry 

at Chateau Thierry Drive, also Division citation ; cpl. ; d May 5, 1919. 26th. 
Stone, Rov P.— e June 5, 1917; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; killed in action 

July, 1918. 26th. 
Sullivan, William H.— e Mar. 31, 1017: d physical Sept. 1, 1017. 
Thompson, Clarence A.— e Jan. 14, 1015; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. ; com. 2nd Lt. 

overseas Sept. 23, 1018; cpl., sgt., 2nd Lt. ; d January, 1919. 
Toth, Stephen F.— e Aug. 2, 1016; trans. 101st Inf. Aug. 28, 1017; d Apr. 28, 

1919. 26th. 
Vallard, AVilfred A.— e May 28, 1917; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1917; died m 

hospital from disease January, 1010. 26th. 
Walsh, Arthur T.— e Sept. 21, 1914; trans, to 104th Inf. Aug 28, 1917; severely 

wounded Oct. 16, 1918; d 1910. 26th. 
Walsh, Patrick— e Mar. 26, 1017; trans. 102nd Inf. Sept. 3, 1017; d April 20, 1919. 

26th. 
Walsh, Thomas F.— e May 27, 1915; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d Apr. 20, 1010. 26th. 
Weaver, Percy R.— e June 4, 1017; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1017; 

gassed Nov. 5, 1018; d May 2, 1010. 26th. 
Wenzel, William L.— e Mar. 20. 1017; trans. 104th Inf. Aug. 28, 1917; severely 

wounded July, 1018; cpl., sgt.; d March, 1010. 26th. 
Wheeler, Sylvanus K.— e May 23, 1017; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1917; 

d May, 1919. 26th. 
Widen, John M.— e Oct. 9, 1002; d Oct. 0, 1004; re Aug. 20, 1006; d Sept. SO, 

1009; re Mar. 20, 1017; trans. 4th Pioneer Regt. February 1918; overseas 

Sept. 23, 1018; Co. I, 330th Regt., 83rd Div.; trans. Central Records office 

Chaumont and Bourges; Casual Co. 4444: cpl., sgt.; d June 6, 1010. 
Williams, Alexander G.— e Oct. 27, 1015; trans. 101st Bug. Train Aug. 30, 1017; 

bug.; d May 20, 1010. 26th. 
Williams, George B. — e Mar. 31, 1017; trans. 101st Military Police Aug. 21, 1017; 

d Mav, 1010. 26th. 
Wright, Roy H.— e Sept. 27, 1016; trans. 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1017; d Apr. 2S. 1919. 

26th. 
Toung, Percj' — e May 8, 1017; trans 101st Inf. Sept. 4, 1017; cited in Div. orders; 

cpl.; d Apr. 28, 1010. 26th. 



30/ 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Massachusetts State Guard 
Company H, 12th Regiment 



Name 

Abbott, Arthur G. 
Andrews, George A. 
Arnold, Roger 
Atkinson, Robert C. 
Bailey, Bert L. 
Batten, Raymond J. 
Baxter, Augustus M. 
Baxter, John A. 
Benjamin, Henry A. 
Bennett, Larkin B. 
Blanchard, Leon A. 
Bonney, Edwin T. 
Boothby, Asa A. 
Branch, George B. 
BridgsB, Charles 
Brindle, Paul E. 
Brown, James B. 
Burns, James J. 
Burns, James J. 
Carter, Albert H. 
Chambers, James J. 
ChandkT. Leon L. 
Clemoiis, IlMi-ry E. 
Clines. Thomas J. 
Collins, Christopher P. 
Colpitts, William B. 
Coffin, Harold F. 
Collins, Albert H. 
Curtis, Harold W. 
Curtis, Harold W. 
Curtis, Percy W. 
Davis, Thomas F. 
Day, Maurice H. 
DeCecca, James 
Dellinger, Raymond P. 
Deveau, John R. 
DiGiacomantonio, Arthuro 
Dingle, Albert J. 
Dingle, Albert J. 
Dolbeare, Richard B. 
Douglas, Leo F. 
Downing. John L. 
Draper, James H. 
Draper, Reuben F. 
Edgett, Harold J. 
Eldridge, Christopher H. 
Esner, Israel 
Feindel, Henry A. 
Fein del, William B. 



Fish, Roger B. 
Frizzell, Ernest L. 
Foley, John J. 
Fuller, Myrton 
Gambale, Carmenuccio 
Gerrior, Lloyd C. 
Gibbons, Thomas J. 
Gordon, Harry S. 
Grattan, George S. 
Haggerty, Philip J. 
Haley, John J. 
Hancock, Herbert D. 
Hanright, Frank R. 
Hanson, Frederick H. 
Harris, John P. 





Enlisted 


Dichargred Bank 


June 


20, 1917 


Nov. 


1. 1920 cpl. 


Sept. 


17, 1917 


Sept. 


17, 1919 


July 


7. 1919 


July 


7, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl., 2d It. 


July 


17, 1919 


Sept. 


30, 1919 cpl. 


June 


20, 1917 


Mar. 


10, 1919 sgt. 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


Feb. 


28, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


Sept. 


13, 1919 


Jan. 


31, 1920 cpl. 


.Tune 


20, 1917 


May 


11, 1920 sgt., 1st sgt. 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


2(1, 1920 cpl., sgt. 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 cpl., sgt. 


May 


20, 1918 


Mar. 


10, 1919 


Dec. 


3, 1917 


Dec. 


3, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


July 


14. 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


Dec. 


9, 1918 


May 


1, 1920 cpl., sgt. 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 sgt., sup. sgt. 


July 


14, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 cpl., sgt. 


Apr. 


1, 1918 


Apr. 


1, 1920 cook 


Apr. 


20, 1920 


Nov. 


1. 1920 


Apr. 


20, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


Oct. 


29, 1917 


Mar. 


1, 1918 


Sept. 


12, 1919 


Mar. 


18, 1920 


Mar. 


25, 1918 


Mar. 


25, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


July 


18, 1918 


Sept. 


14, 1919 


May 


1, 1920 


July 


14, 1919 


July 


14, 1920 


Apr. 


22, 1918 


Apr. 


22, 1920 


July 


16, 1919 


July 


16, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


July 


18, 1919 


July 


IS 1920 


July 


18, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


July 


18, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 bglr 


July 


17, 1919 


Sept. 


17, 1919 


Aug. 


28, 1917 


Nov. 


1, 1920 1st It., capt. 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


July 


7, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl., Sgt. 


May 


13, 1918 


Mav 


13, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


Feb. 


14, 1920 sgt., 1st sgt., 2d It. 


Aug. 


28. 1917 


Feb. 


14, 1920 2d It., 1st It. 


Previous service 


. e Co. A May 12, 1893; re Apr. t 


1898; 


Spanish ' 


War; mustered out Jan. 21, 189 


re Oct. 26, 1900; 


d Nov. 


30, 1900. 


Nov. 


4, 1918 


Sept. 
July 


9, 1919 


July 


19, 1919 


19, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


16, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl. 


Sept. 


26, 1919 


Oct. 


10, 1919 


Sept. 


23, 1919 


Nov. 


15, 1919 


Sept. 


16, 1919 


Oct. 


10, 1919 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 cpl., mess sgt. 


June 


20. 1917 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cook 


July 


16, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


Jan. 


31, 1920 cpl. 


Sept. 


13, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


June 


20, 1917 


June 


20, 1919 


Oct. 


29, 1917 


Apr. 


30, 1918 


Sept. 


13, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl. 



308 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Name 

Hazel, Alfred H. 
Hitchcock, Edward S. 
Holmes, Alvin D. 
Ingerton, David F. 
Jones, Artliur C. 
King-, .1. Walter 
Knox. William E. 
LaFave, Arthur .1. 
LaFave. Louis J. 
Lee. George W. 
Libby. Samuel A. 
Low, Louis F. 
MacRae. Walter S. 
jMagee. Andre^Y A. 
Malonev. Walter Y. 
McGonigle. Stephen J. 
Marion. Francis H. 
Meuse, Edward .1. 
Meuse. Edward J. 
Muise, Arthur J. 
McCalluni. Guy 
McDuffee, Edwin 
McMahon, John H. 
Menadue. Sidney J. 
Monighan. Joseph M. 
Morgan, Henry J. 
Murphy. Paul 
Murphy, William J. 
Muse, Arthur 
Muse, J. Arthur 
Muse, John W. 
Muse, Louis 
Muse. Thomas W. 
Nelson, Frank A. 
Nelson, Walter P. 
O'Neil, George M. 
Owler, Thomas D. 
Palumbo, Antonio 
Parker, Samuel T. 
Pendergrace, Edward 
Perry, Prospier R. 
Peterson. Carl G. 
Porter. Leander B. 
Reardon. John 
Reid. Henry K. 
Reid, James R. 
Reid. John A. 
Reynolds. Philip F. 
Richard, Charles W. 
Richard. Charles W. 
Robinson, William E. 
Rogers, Clarence A. 
Rowe, Leon C. 
Ruggles, George E. 
Russell, Harry A. 
Ryland. Herbert J. 
Salvati. Arnold T. 
Sawyer, Walter W. 
Scott, James W., Jr. 
Scott, William D. 
Simonds, Harry A. 
Singer. Archie' 
Skulley, Gerald F. 
Smith, Charles 
Smith, Howard H. 
Smith, James D. 
Soteriades, George T. 
Sproul, Charles G. 
Stafford. John C. 
Stoddard. Frank B. 
Stone. Walter H. 



July 
June 
.June 
Sept. 
Oct. 
June 
June 
July 
July 
June 
June 
June 
July 
June 
July 
July 
Aug. 
July 
July 
July 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
Nov. 
July 
June 
Sept. 
June 
Sept. 
Apr. 
June 
Sept. 
July 
June 
June 
Feb. 
June 
H. June 
Nov. 
Nov. 
June 
.Tune 
.Tune 
.Tune 
Sept. 
Oct. 
July 
July 
Sept. 
July 
Oct. 
June 
June 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
June 
Sept. 
June 
Sept. 
Julv 
Sept. 
July 
June 
Oct. 
Sept. 
June 
.Tune 
Oct. 



Enlisted 

16. 1019 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 

16, 1919 
29, 1917 

17, 1920 
20, 1917 
14. 1919 
14. 1919 
20. 1917 
20. 1917 
20, 1917 
16, 1919 
20, 1917 

14, 1919 
16, 1919 

28, 1917 

18, 1919 
18, 1920 
16, 1919 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 

5, 1917 

16, 1919 
20, 1917 

29, 1919 

17, 1920 
17, 1917 
26, 1920 
20, 1917 

23, 1919 

15, 1919 

30, 1919 
20. 1917 

24. 1919 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 
12, 1917 

12, 1919 
20, 1917 
14, 1920 
20. 1917 
20. 1917 
1.5. 1920 
11, 1919 
14. 1919 
14. 1920 
10, 1917 

16, 1919 
3, 1917 

20, 1917 

20, 1917 

1, 1917 

13, 1919 

17, 1919 
20, 1917 
13, 1919 
20. 1917 

13. 1919 

14, 1919 
24, 1919 
14, 1919 
20, 1917 
29, 1917 

1, 1917 
20, 1917 
20, 1917 
29, 1917 



Dicharged Rank 

Apr. 8, 1920 cpl. 



June 


20. 1919 


Dec. 


20. 1917 


Sept. 


16. 1920 


Oct. 


29, 1919 cpl. 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


May 


1. 1920 


Sept. 


9, 1919 


July 


14, 1920 


.Tune 


20, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl., sgt.,mess sgt. 


Apr. 


30, 1918 


July 


16, 1920 


Jan. 


25, 1918 


July 


14, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


Feb. 


14, 1920 sgt., 2d It. 


July 


IS. 1920 


Nov. 


1. 1920 


July 


16. 1920 


June 


20, 1919 


June 


20, 1919 


Oct. 


1920 


June 


20, 1919 cpl. 


June 


20, 1919 


July 


22, 1918 


July 


16, 1920 


Oct. 


12, 1918 


Oct. 


10, 1919 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl. 


Nov. 


1. 1920 


.Tune 


20. 1919 


Sept. 


23. 1920 


Nov. 


1. 1920 cpl. 


Nov. 


1. 1920 


.Tune 


21). 1919 cpl. 


P>h. 


24, 1921) 


.Tan. 


25. 191S 


.Tune 


20. 1919 


Nov. 


1. 1920 


July 


7. 1920 cpl. 


June 


20. 1919 sgt. 


Nov. 


1.1920 


June 


20, 1920 cpl., sgt. 


Dec. 


20. 1917 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl. 


Oct. 


11, 1920 sgt. 


July 


14, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


Sept. 


10, 1920 


Apr. 


8, 1920 


May 


8, 1920 


Apr. 


30, 1918 


.Tune 


20, 1919 


Sept. 


1, 1920 bglr. 


.Tan. 


31. 1920 


Mar. 


18. 1920 


Feb. 


14. 1919 


Nov. 


1. 1920 bglr. 


June 


20, 1919 cpl. 


Sept. 


13. 1920 


July 


7, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 


July 


14, 1920 


Nov. 


1, 1920 cpl., 1st It. 


Oct. 


29. 1919 cpl. 


Dec. 


20. 1917 


Nov. 


29. 1918 


Mar. 


1. 1918 


Dec. 


24. 1918 



309 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

:Sullivan, Christopher P. July 16, 1919 Mar. 18, 1920 

Surrette, Edmund L. Sept. 13, 1919 Sept. 13, 1920 

Terravecchia, Charles July 14, 1919 July 14, 1920 

Toth, Frank J. June 20, 1917 Apr. 30, 1918 

Vedito, Wendell July 14, 1919 July 14, 1920 

Vining, Philip B. June 17. 191S July 19, 1919 

Wakefield, Cyrus, Jr. July 16, 1919 Oct. 27, 1919 

Wallace, Frederick E. Sept. 1, 1917 Nov. 29, 1918 cpl. 

Walsh, William J. Feb. 24, 1919 Feb. 24, 1920 

Waterhouse, George L. June 24, 1918 July 19, 1910 

White, Henry G. July 15, 1919 Nov. 1, 1920 

Whitney, Arthur G. July 15, 1918 Nov. 1, 1920 cpl., sup. sgt. 

Willey, Herbert B. June 20, 1917 Feb. 5, 1919 

Willey, Louis P. Dec. 2, 1918 July 19, 1919 

Winegen, Frank Sept. 13, 1919 Nov. 1. 1920 

Wood, David E. June 16, 1919 June 16, 1920 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 

MASSACHUSETTS NATIOiNAL GUARD 

Company E, 182nd Infantry 

May, 1920— August, 1926 

(See front of book for changes in designations) 



Name 

Anderson, Harold 

Bannon, Edward W. 

Bannon, John T. 

Barrett, James T. 

Barrett, Joseph T. 

Bartlett, Paul W. 

Beane, Raymond J. 

Beebe, John H., Jr. 

Behrle, Albert 

Beighley, John C. 

Bennett, Elmer F. 

Berry, Albert L. 

Berry, Roger C. 

Bird, Edward F. 

Bird, Edward F., Jr. 

Bird, Harry H. 

Boudreau, Louis A. 

Bourne, Osgood W. 

Bowdren, Medouph J. 

Bowdren, Vincent B. 

Broekbank, Wm. P. 

Brown, James G. 

Brown, William D. 

Brown, William D. 

Burbine, Joseph J. 

Cameron, David E. 

Cavalieri, Paul 

Chambers, James J. 

Chambers, James J. 

Cheever, Carl I. 

Clark, John 

Clem, George M. 

Connell, Joseph J. 

Cotting-, Merrill P. 

Cottreau, Charles A. 

Cottreau, Clifford J. 

Cottreau, John C. 

Crowley, John J. 
Cucurullo. Charles 
Gushing-, Ernest E. 
Gushing, Raymond W. 
Daley, John J. 
Davis, Merton E. 
Davis, Ramon C. 
Dellarocco, Elmer 
Denley, Roy L. 
DeMarco, Fred 
D'Entremont, Augustin A. 
Deveau, John R. 
Dingle, John T. 
Dolbeare, Richard B. 
Doucette. Fred J. 
Doucette, Joseph C. 
Doucette, Leo J. 
Doucette, Harold A. 
Doucette, Louis H. 
Draper, Reuben F. 
Ducharme, Albert F. 
Dulong-, Albennie J. 
Dulong, James L. 
Dulong, Louis J. 
DuPont, Foster 





Enlisted 


Dischargred Kank 


Dec. 


9, 1920 


Feb. 23, 1922 


Nov. 


7, 1921 


Nov. 6, 1924 


.June 


11, 1920 


July 13, 1924 


Sept. 


8, 1924 


Still in service cpl. 


Sept. 


23, 1920 


June 28,1921 


May 


28, 1920 


May 28, 1923cpli. 


June 


11, 1920 


June 10, 1921 sgt. 


Nov. 


26, 1920 


July 10, 1922 2d It. 


Oct. 


1, 1923 


Jan. 9, 1925 


Sept. 


24, 1920 


Apr. 6, 1921 


Nov. 


13, 1924 


Still in service 


.June 


3, 1920 


Jan. 12, 1923 


July 


1, 1924 


Jan. 18,1925 


Jan. 


30, 1921 


Mar. 2, 1925 mech. 


Mar. 


3, 1925 


Mar. 3, 1926 


Oct. 


18, 1920 


Oct. 17, 1923 mess sgt. 


June 


3, 1920 


June 2, 1921 


^ov. 


13, 1923 


July 27, 1923 


Feb. 


24, 1922 


Apr. 11, 1922 


Jan. 


3, 1921 


Jan. 2, 1924 


July 


3, 1922 


July 3, 1925 cpl. 


Sept. 


9, 1920 


Dec. 18, 1922 1st It. 


Oct. 


24, 1921 


Jan. 12, 1923 


Aug. 


3, 1923 


Dec. 15, 1923 


June 


3, 1920 


Feb. 23, 1922 


Jan. 


28, 1924 


Still in service 


June 


2, 1924 


Still in service 


Sept. 


27, 1920 


June 13, 1924 1st sgt. 


Dec. 


1, 1924 


July 3, 1925 1st sgt. 


Dec. 


6, 1920 


Still in service 1st It. 


Julv 


2, 1923 


Dec. 15, 1923 


June 


3, 1920 


Feb. 1, 1921 


Nov. 


15, 1920 


Nov. 14, 1923 


June 


10, 1920 


July 1, 1922 cpl. 


Feb. 


4, 1924 


Feb. 27, 1925 


Feb. 


11, 1924 


Still in service 


June 


16, 1924 


Still in service 


June 


3, 1920 


June 2, 1921 


June 


2, 1924 


Still in service 


Sept. 


15, 1924 


Still in service 


Apr. 


1, 1924 


Still in service 


Apr. 


12, 1926 


June 11,1926 


Oct. 


26, 1925 


Still in service 


Jan. 


14,. 1924 


June 20, 1924 


Nov. 


15, 1920 


Feb. 10, 1922 


Mar. 


12, 1923 


Still in service cpl. 


May 


15, 1922 


Sept. 27,1923 


Sept. 


17, 1923 


Jan. 8, 1925 


Mar. 


14, 1921 


Mar. 13. 1925 


Feb. 


14, 1921 


July 30, 1926 1st sgt. 


Sept. 


17, 1923 


Still in service 1st sgt. 


Dec. 


18, 1920 


Dec. 17, 1923 


Sept. 
July 


23, 1920 


Feb. 23, 1922 


2, 1923 


Dec. 15. 1923 


Sept. 


30, 1920 


Feb. 23, 1922 


Oct. 


21, 1920 


Oct. 20, 1923 


June 


27, 1921 


Oct. 28, 1921 


Nov. 


17, 1924 


Mar. 16, 1926 


Nov. 


20, 1922 


Nov. 20, 1925 


July 


7, 1923 


Jan. 10,1924 


Dec. 


30, 1920 


Apr. 6, 1921 


Dec. 


20, 1920 


Feb. 23,1922 



311 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Dyer, George H. Jan. 4, 1923 

Eastman, Ernest R. Oct. 17, 1921 

Fay, George J. June 3, 1920 

Eeindel, Abbott Sept. 13, 1923 

Flint, Alvin L. Dee. 22, 1921 

Foley, William F. Oct. 26,1920 

Foss, Benjamin D., Jr. June 18, 1923 

Franklin, Neil May 10,1926 

B^raughton, George P. June 3, 1920 

French, Jolm Mar. 1, 1926 

Gallagher, Francis W. Sept. IS, 1924 

Galvin, Daniel H. June 3, 1920 

Garland, Raymond L. July 2, 1924 

Gerrior, Hilton M. Nov. 8, 1920 

Gerry, Frank V. July 8, 1925 

Gibbs. Robert P. July 2,1923 

Glynn, Charles M. Dec. 20, 1920 

Goodwin, George D. Dec. 27,1920 

Gould, Frank J. Oct. 5, 1925 

■Greenleaf, Harold A. June 3, 1920 

Hackett, Frank H., Jr. Dec. 20, 1920 

Haggerty, Philip J. Nov. 18, 1920 

Hall, George W. June 27, 1921 

Hall, Philip G. Sept. 23,1920 

Hall, William A. Sept. 28, 1920 

Halloran, George E. June 3, 1920 

Banright, Hubert H. Feb. 14, 1921 

Harlow, Melburn N. Jan. 14,1921 

Hathaway, James J. June 11, 1923 

Hopkins, John W. May 28,1923 

Hoyte, Paul A. Dec. 5, 1921 

Hubbard, Fred J. June 11, 1920 

Huestis, Charles A. Jan. 30, 1922 

Ingerton, David F. Sept. 28, 1920 

Jacobs, John R. Feb. 26, 1925 

Johnson, Robert E. Jan. 14, 1921 

Keating, Joseph P. Sept. 23, 1920 

Kelly, Charles J. June 3, 1920 

Kenney, William J. Dec. 9, 1920 

King, Joseph W. Sept. 23, 1920 

Kivell, Joseph F. Nov. 21, 1921 

LaBlanc, Everett H. Oct. 19, 1920 

DaFave, Jeftrey J. Mar. 10, 1921 

LaFave, Lawrence J. Mar. 13, 1922 

LeBlanc, Willard G. Mar. 10, 1921 

Leone, Guidino Sept. 24,1923 

Leone, Sabistino S. Sept. 18, 1924 

Lilley, Charles B. July 2,1923 

Lilley, Harry F. July 2, 1923 

Lloyd, Ralph T. May 10, 1926 

Lucey, Joseph A. Sept. 23, 1920 

Luken, Roy E. June 3, 1920 

Lux, Julius F. Oct. 4, 1920 

Lyons, John J. June 3. 1920 

Mahoney, Herbert P. Dec. 10.1923 

Malonson, Parker J. June 9, 1924 

Marchetti, Frank F. Sept. 9, 1920 

Marchetti, George L. Sept. 16, 1920 

Marchetti. Hugo H. Jan. 10, 1921 

Maroni, John D. June 27, 1921 

Martin, John July 8, 1925 

Martin, John E. Nov. 13, 1922 

Martin, Paul M. July 25, 1921 

Masse, Michele June 21, 1924 

McClellan, William F. Jan. 22, 1928 

McGill, James C. July 2, 1923 

McGonigle, Stephen Sept. 23, 1920 

McGuire, Herbert H. July 25, 1921 

Melonson, Harold J. June 27,1921 

Meredith, John F. Oct. 5, 1925 

Meuse, Edward J. Sept. 25, 1920 

Maxwell, George J. June 11, 1920 

Meuse,. Frederick A. Nov. 24, 1924 



Jan. 
Oct. 
Apr. 
June 
Mar. 
Apr. 
June 



9, 1925 

16, 1922 
6, 1921 

20, 1924 cpl. 
24, 1922 
6, 1921 

17, 1926 
Still in service cpl. 
June 3, 1923 sgt. 
June 11. 1926 
Still in service 
July 31, 1926 cpl. 
Feb. 26, 1925 
Jan. 12,1923 
Still in service bglr 
Dec. 15, 1923 
April 6, 1921 
June 28, 1921 
Still in service cpl. 
July 27, 1021 sup. sgt. 
Dec. 30. 1921 

Nov. 17, 1923 
Still in service cpl. 
July 6. 1923 

28, 1921 

27, 1921 

14. 1921 
6, 1921 

10. 1926 cook 

27, 1926 

11, 1922 

28, 1921 

15, 1923 
23, 1922 

Still in service 
Oct. 14, 1921 
6, 1921 
23, 1922 
6, 1921 
22, 1923 
20, 1925 

18, 1923 
9, 1924 

13, 1926 cpl. 
9, 1924 
Still in service 
Still in service 
Dec. 15, 1923 
Dec. 15, 1923 
Still in service 
Sept. 22, 1923 
Sept. 28, 1923 
Oct. 3, 1923 
June 2, 1926 1st sgt. 
Nov. 27, 1925 
Still in service 
Still in service 2d It. 
June 22, 1923 bglr 
Jan. 9, 1924 
June 27, 1925 cpl. 
Still in service cook 
Still in service cpl. 
Oct. 14. 1921 
Still in service 
Feb. 26, 1925 
Dec. 15, 1923 
Sept. 22. 1923 
July 3, 1922 
Still in service 
Still in service sgt. 
Sept. 24, 1925 sgt. • 
Apr. 6, 1921 
Still in service 



Jan 

July 

Oct. 

Apr. 

June 

May 

Apr. 

Jan. 

June 

Feb. 



Apr. 
Feb. 
Apr. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



312 



History Of Richardson Light Guard 



Meuse, Leo J. Sept. 20. 1923 

Mieliore, Hosario F. June 2, 1!)24 

Mortimer. Clareiice R. Dec. 13, 1920 

Mortimer, Harry E. Dec. 22, 1921 

:M()seliella. Anthony Jan. 19, 1925 

Mlllner. Leslie F. Apr. 12,1926 

Muise. Benoit A. Feb. 11, 1924 

Murphv. William A. July 2, 1923 

:Muse, Edward D. Oct. 15, 1920 

Muse, Edward J. July 2, 1923 

:\Iuse, Joseph A. Sept. 27,1920 

]N[use, William E. Apr. 23, 1923 

Nazella, Joseph Sept. 18,1924 

Neiss, Archie J. Mar. 7, 1921 

Nelson, Frank A. Sept. 23, 1920 

Nelson, Walter P. Sept. 23,1920 

Northrup. Edward E. Oct. 11,1920 

O'Learv, John J. Dec. 27, 1920 

Oxlev, "Charles A. June 3, 1920 

Pasqualino, Philip P. Mar. 13, 1922 

Phelan, John J. Mar. 20, 1922 

Phillips, Thomas H. Mar. 1, 1926 

Pizzano, Charles Sept. 15, 1924 

Pizzano, Ernest E. Sept. 6, 1923 

Pizzano, James Nov. 20, 1922 

Procurst, John Nov. 27, 1923 

Quinn, Peter A. Oct. 7, 1920 

Quinn, Thomas J. May 19, 1920 

Rand, Ralph Jan. 3, 1921 

Randell. Wyman S. Aug. 1, 1925 

Reardon. Andrew M. Jan. 20, 1921 

Rich, Frank Jan. 28, 1924 

Rich. Henrv J. Mar. 27, 1922 

Richard, Charles W. Jan. 22, 1923 

Richard, Thomas May 30, 1924 

Robbins, Frank J. June 21, 1924 

Rohy, Harry B. Jan. 4, 1923 

Samuels, Rav F. Nov. 20, 1922 

Santore, Michael J. June 26, 1922 

Scott, William D. Sept. 25, 1920 

Serrentino, Constantino June 2, 1924 

Sheppard, Albert E. Dec. 20, 1923 

Shaw, John T. Dec. 15, 1924 

Smith, Charles W. Sept. 25, 1920 

Smith. Arthur J. July 5, 1921 

Smith, Cvrus F. Aug. 5, 1921 

Smith, Frank J. Nov. 8, 1920 

Smith, Howard H. Sept. 27, 1920 

Smith, Martin S. July 25, 1922 

Smith, Raymond J. Oct. 23, 1922 

Spadaforo. Robert J. Sept. 16, 1920 

Stamegna, Angle J. June 3, 1920 

Storti, Joseph A. Jan. 28, 1924 

Sullivan, Paul J. Nov. 15, 1920 

Sullo, Edward A. Nov. 8, 1920 

Sweeney, William F. Sept. 28, 1920 

Sweetman, William G. Feb. 14, 1921 

Tennev, Leslie J. Jan. 2, 1925 

Thompson. Clarence A. May 19,1920 

Thompson, Clarence A. Oct. 22,1923 

Todesco, Clement L. Sept. 6, 1923 

Toth. Stephen F. June 3, 1920 

Tracey. William J. Dec. 20, 1920 

Vielicks. Tony Nov. 20, 1922 

Wade, Uoy R. Oct. 22, 1923 

Walsh. John F. July 8, 1921 

Walsh. William J. Jan. 3, 1921 

Waters, Andrew E. Dec. 15, 1924 

Wells, Frank J. June 26, 1922 

Wengen, Frank J. Nov. 18, 1920 

Wenzel, J. Merritt July 2, 1923 

Wheeler, Sylvan us K. June 3, 1920 

White, Henry C. Feb. 28, 1921 



Mar. 10, 1926 
Still in service 
Apr. 6, 1921 
July 14, 1922 
Still in service 
June 11, 1926 
Still in service 
Dec. 15, 1923 
Jan. 28, 1921 
Dec. IS. 1923 
Jan. 12, 1923 
Apr. 23. 1926 
Still in service 
June 1, 1921 
Sept. 22, 1923 
Feb. 23, 1922 cpl. 
Mar. 25, 1921 
Still in service 
Jan. 28, 1921 
July 21, 1924 
Jan. 10. 1924 
June 11, 1926 
Still in service 
Still in service 
May 4, 1923 
Still in service 
June 19, 1925 
Still in service capt. 
Feb. 23, 1922 
Still in service cpl. 
July 3, 1925 
Still in service 
Mar. 27, 1925 sgt. 
Jan. 21, 1926 cpl. 
Still in service 
Still in service 
Still in service cook 
Jan. 9, 1925 cpl. 
June 15,1923 
June 27, 1924 cpl. 
Still in service 
Still in service 
Still in service 
Sept. 24. 1923 cpl. 
~ " 5. 1924 cook 

4, 1924 cook 

29, 1923 sgt. 

13, 1922 
8, 1925 

25, 1924 sgt. 

15, 1923 

24, 1921 
Still in service 
Nov. 14. 1925 sgt. 
Nov. 7, 1923 
Nov. 10, 1921 
Jan. 27, 1922 
Still in service cpl. 
Sept. 9, 1920 1st It. 
Jan. 14, 1924 
Still in service 
June 2, 1921 
Dec. 9, 1921 
Still in service 
Still in service 
Feb. 23, 1922 
Jan. 2, 1924 sui 
Still in service sgt. 
June 29, 1923 
Nov. 17, 1925 sgt. 
Still in service sgt. 
Nov. 10, 1921 1st sgt. 
Feb. 27, 1924 mess sgt. 



July 
Aug. 
June 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Sept. 
June 



Sgt. 



313 



H I STORY 


Of R 


ICHAR 


White, Walter C, Jr. 


Nov. 


12, 1924 


Wood, Alfred E. 


July 


7, 1923 


Wood, Bertram 


Jan. 


25, 1926 


Wood, Theodore R. 


Mar. 


8, 1926 


Woods, David S. 


Dec. 


6, 1920 


Wright, Roy H. 


Oct. 


14, 1920 


Zanni, John E. 


June 


27, 1921 



Light G uard 



still in service sup. sgt. 

Jan. 10, 1924 

Still in service 

June 11, 1926 

Nov. 17, 1922 

Oct. 13, 1923 1st. sgt. 

June 26,1924 



314 



INDEX 

Military Designations of the Richardson Light Guard 8" 

Introduction 9 

Chapter 1 — Company A's Golden Anniversary 13 

Chapter 2 — Annual Elections, Drills, and Company Events, 

1902 to 1907 18. 

Chapter 3— The Company, 1907 to 1910 32 

Chapter 4 — The Company, 1910. Burning of Armory, 1911. 

Lawrence Strike, 1912 46. 

Chapter 5 — Dedication of New State Armory, 1913. Company 

events to 1915 61 

Chapter 6 — Company Events, 1915. iVlexican Border Cam- 
paign, 1916. The New National Guard to April, 

1917 72- 

Chapter 7— Capt. James H. Keough 89 

Chapter 8 — Company H, 12th Regiment, Mass. State Guard. 
Service during World War period and the Boston 

Police Strike, 1919 96 

Chapter 9 — World War Declared. Call for Recruits. Fine 
Members' Association. War Relief Work. Lady 

Associates. Off to Camp 107 

Chapter 10 — Farewell Reception to Company A. Transfers, 
Promotions, Break-Up of Company. Off for 
France. Arrival and Training Periods in Eng- 
land and France 124 

Chapter 1 1— The 26th Division Military Police 146 

Chapter 12 — Off To The Front, La Reine, Bouco Sector, Apre- 

mont. Seicheprey, Chauteau Thierry 154 

Chapter 13 — St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Haumont Wood 164 

Chapter \4 — After the Armistice. Rest Areas. Embarking for 

Home 182 

Chapter 15 — The Home Coming — parades, receptions, ban- 
quets. General Edwards visits Wakefield 188 

Chapter 16 — The Supreme Sacrifice. Honor Roll, List of 

Wounded. Decorations and Citations 197 

Chapter 17— Basketball and Athletics 206 

Chapter 18— Rifle Shooting 1901 to 1909 216- 

Chapter 19— Rifle Shooting 1909 to 1914 231 

Chapter 20— Rifle Shooting 1914 to 1926. Marksmanship and 

Drill Medals 249 

Chapter 21 — Re-organization of the Company, 1919. Company 

activities to 1 926 263 

Roster of Company Sept. 1, 1926 283 

Chapter 22— Anniversary Plans 284 

Chapter 23 — Seventy-Fifth Anniversary. Military Parade. 
Dedication of "Fliker" Monument. Spanish 

War Veterans' Reunion. Anniversary Banquet 287 

Rosters of Richardson Light Guard 

1 . Compan v A— 1 90 1 - 1 9 1 7 296 

2. Company A During World War 302 

3. State Guard Company 308 

4. Company E 1920-1926 311 

Index 315 

List of 1 llustrations 316 

315 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Portraits. 

Beebe, Lieut. John H., Jr 266 

Brockbank, Lieut. Harvey G 2.3 

Brown, Lieut. James G 265 

Cheatham, Col. B. F 185 

Cheever, Lieut. Carl 1 267 

Connelly, Major Edward J 110 

Downing, Capt. John L 97 

Feindel, Lieut. Henry A 102 

Hawkes, Lieut. Edgar B. 147 

Keough, Capt. James H. 90 

Marchetti, Lieut. Frank F. 267 

McMahon, Capt. John H. 18 

Quinn, Capt. Thomas J 267 

Richardson, Dr. Solon O. 4 

Richardson, Solon 6 

Richardson, Solon O. (Toledo) 7 

Rogers, Major Fred H 47 

Sedgley, Lieut. Alton R 23 

Group Pictures: 
Richardson Light Guard War 

Captains 12 

Company A at Framingham 

1903 21 

Company A at Frammgham 

1906 29 

Company A at Armory 1908 35 

Company A Officers, 1911 49 

Company A Officers and Non- 
Coms at Lawrence Strike, 

1912 55 

Company A Maneuvers 1914 69 

State Guard Company at 

Camp, 1917 98 

Company A, April 1917 112 

Company A, Leaving for Fort 

Revere 114 

Company A at Framingham, 

1917 121 

Company A at Camp Devens, 

1917 121 

Company A, Farewell, 1917 124 

Company Truck, 1917 129 

Non-Coms, promoted to Offi- 
cers in World War 134 

Men Killed Overseas 195-196 

Men Decorated 199 

Basket Ball Teams, 1902, 3, 4, 5 207 
Basket Ball Teams, Company 

A, 1915-1916 209 

Company H, Track Team, 
1915-1916 209 



Basket Ball, first team. Com- 
pany A, 1916-17 213 

Basket Ball, second team, 
Company K, 101st Inf., 

1919-1920 214 

Group, Company E, 182nd at 

Camp Devens 281 

Miscellaneous. 

Accolade to Wounded Soldiers 194 
Bay State Military Rifle 

Range, Wakefield 253 

Camp Green, 1918 131 

Camp Green, 1918 132 

Communicating Trench, France 171 

Convoy to France, 1917 138 

Croix de Guerre Certificate 200 

Dedication Banquet, 1913 62 

Decorating Colors 104th Inf 159 

Dugouts, Verdun 172 

Equipment of Soldier, 1917 136 

Front of State Armory 60 

Greenwood Boulder to World 

War Veterans 187 

Gun, 37mm, Verdun 179 

Hall Clock 63 

Harreville les Chanteurs 144 

Hurry Call To The Front 156 

Hiker Monument, Spanish War 

Memorial 291 

Kitchen Scene, France 170 

Military Ball, 1916 85 

Neufchateau, France 141 

Neuville Ruins 176 

Pine Plains Camp, 1908 36 

Pistols Used in World War 133 

Recruiting Posters, 1917 107 

Road, Death Valley 173 

Rifle Models 40 

Ruins, Armory Fire. 1911 51 

Ruins, Catholic Church, Seiche- 
prey, France 160 

State Armory in 1926 285 

Stokes Mortar Section 155 

Trenches, St. Mihiel Battle 166 
Tresauvaux, France 168 

Troop Train, 26th Division 163 
Verdun Battlefield 174 

Verdun Ruins 175 

Verdun Ruins of Church 181 

Welcome Home, 1910 192 

World War Memorial Boulder 
on the Common 264 



316 



Rifle Team Trophies. 

Co. A, 6th Mass. Inf. 
1901 Statuette "La Chasse" 217 

1901 "Capture of a French 
Battery by 52nd Regiment 

at Waterloo" 218 

1902 "La Platriere" 220 

1903 "Combat Sur Une Voie 
Ferree" 22 1 

1904 "Battle of Concord" 222 

1905 "Sherman's March to the 
Sea" 224 

1907 "Attack of Ironclads on 
Fort Sumter" 226 

1909 Shield, N. E. Indoor 
Champions 231 

1910 Cup, Second Prize Regi- 
mental Competition 235 

1911 "All That Was Left of 
Them, Left of 600" 237 

1911 Shield, Outdoor State 
Champions 238 

1912 Silver Cup, Indoor Regi- 
mental Championship 240 

1912 Shield, Indoor State 
Championship 241 

1912 "1815" 243 

1913 First Corps Cadets per- 
manent trophy 245 

1913 Bronze Shield, Pfaff Tro- 
phy 246 

1913 "Surrender of Cornwallis 
at Yorktown" 247 



1914 "Washington's Trium- 
phant Entry Into Phila- 
delphia" 250 

1915 "Henry Hudson Entering 
New York Bay" 252 

Co. K, 9th Inf. and 101st Inf. 
1921 Peters' Cartridge Com- 
pany Trophy 257 

1921 Cup, Regimental Champ- 
ionship 258 

1922 Cup, State Indoor Second 
Prize 258 

Co. E, 182nd Regt. 

1923 Cup, Third Prize Indoor 
State Competition 258 

1924 Cup, Regimental Cham- 
pionship 258 

Maps. 
Ecommoy Area 184 

Noncourt Training Area 142 

St. Mihiel Area 165 

Vauxaillon Sector 152 

Verdun and Meuse-Argonne 178 

Athletic Team Trophies. 
Company A, 6th Massachusetts 

Infantry, Six Prizes 210 

Company H, State Guard 103 

Company K, 101st Infantry, 
Basket Ball 274 

Rifle Teams. 

1910 Company Team 234 

1911 State Rifle Champions 239 



317 



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